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Full text of "Bassett's scrap book"

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Scraps from N.R. IV S J 



TO READ AND TO HOLD 
TO BE WISE AND TO BE MERRY 



published Monthly 



A COLLECTOR AND PURVEYOR OF ODD BITS OF INFORMATION 
IN THE DOMAIN OF HISTORY, LITERATURE, 
, - , BIOGRAPHY, B,UMPR, ETCl 



toARGW, 1909 



~_ T j.>_i_i_ 



50 C*Jrit£ Per V^ar ; 60 Cents in Boston Postal 
District (for extra postage.) 5 Cents Single Copy. 



L. A. W. PUBLISHING COMPANY* 

Room 22, 22i Columbus Avenue, BOSTON, MASS. 




Organized in Newport, R. I., May 31, 1880. 



OFFICERS FOR 1909. 

President: 

Walter M. Meserole. 44 Court St., Brooklyn. N. Y 

1st Vice President: 
Frank W. Weston, Boston, Mass. 

rd Vice President: 
Fred Atwater, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Secretary-Treasurer and Editor: 
Abbot Bassett. 221 Columbus A. v e.. Boston. Mass. 



The objects of this association are (a), to promote and 
encourage bicycl.e •fjdijig .for. »busin£ss„ pleasure and health: 
(b), to protect 3*nd* ftefonftfttiej lights Vf Jvhfe^lJti^n* Jvfio are 
members of thft 'as'sbciationf '(^^'td-erKrodrfl^e*. jfn<3; facili- 
tate touring at home and .abroad; (d,\.tq procure the pas- 
sage and enforcement of llbr&s . € for th« t% «construction and 
maintenance of highways" 'a*nd 'bicycle pa*tns; to promote a 
fraternal spirit Ja^ph^fts 1 m^mpefs, .by frequent .rrweets and 
reunions. !•*:*..' • .•*,*. /•*"" •!•*'• V I * * *• 

We are here to stav*! ' We'Vlo'riofp'fopose 'to? f®wer our 
flag so long as there remains with us one of the old guard 
to pull on the halyards. 



4h>q. 



Xo 



1* 

BasSett'S Scrap BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-|1.50 an inch. Repeat, If unchanged, guo an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 1 MARCH, 1909 5 Cents 



THE OLD WHEEL. 

I »annot ride the old wheel 

I tode long time ago; 
My legs, played out, will not respond, 

I cannot make it go. 
The rust is on the handle bar, 

'Tis hanging in the shed. 
I cannot ride the old wheel, 

The tire is flat and dead. 

I cannot ride the old wheel, 

But yet for many a day 
I'll not forget the fun we've had, 

They can't take that away. 
Those days awheel when youth was bright 

And life was full of glee; 
I cannot ride the old wheel, 

Alas! that this should be. 

I cannot ride the old wheel, 

My head in sorrow bends. 
For was it not the wheel that gave 

To me my cycling friends? 
Old age steals on, my strength is gone, 

I try to ride in vain, 
I cannot ride the old wheel, 

Yet still the friends remain. 




BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 
A SOFT ROAD IS A HARD RIDE. 
The wheel that's lent is soonest bent. 



Season opens next month. Begin to polish up. 
With this number we begin our seventh volume. 



President Meserole has bought an automobile. 
First case on record of a League President driving 
an auto while in office. They generally wait till they 
retire. Members may expect League privileges on 
the Presidential car. 



The man who steals a watch generally winds up 
in jail. 



The best living definition of a saint is the man who 
simply says ''Hang it!" when he punctures a tire. 



The Saltonstall trophy has reappeared on the 
cycling horizon. It was given by Henry L. Salton- 
stall in 1893 f° r competition at all world's champion- 
ship meets. England won it once and on the second 
try for it the cup came to America. The cup cost 
$1,000 and was decidedly a white elephant for the 
winner. When it came to the L. A. W. we had to 
give the usual bond and keep it in a safe deposit 
vault where no one could see it. We returned it to 
the Union Cycliste Internationale at the expiration 
of the year during which we were entitled to hold it. 
It never could go into the permanent possession of 
anv one. It is now proposed to give it to any coun- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK I 

try that wins it three times in succession. Mr. Sal- 
tonstall died at Elizabeth, N. J., last year. 



This issue may look something like a Weston 
number. Well, why not? The Father of his coun- 
try and the Father of wheeling have one thing in 
common — an initial. 



Several important birthdays this month: March 
6, General Philip H. Sheridan; March 15, Andrew 
Jackson; March 10, modesty forbids that we should 
thrust the name before the public. 



The Nylan of New York has elected the following 
officers: Chairman, George T. Stebbins, Brooklyn; 
Vice Chairman, Charles F. Cossum, of Poughkeep- 
sie; Secretary, L. P. Cowell, of New York. The 
next meeting and banquet will be held this month 
at Albanv. 



At a recent inquest in England on a cyclist who 
had died suddenly from heart disease, it was stated 
in evidence that he "had evidently ridden hard, for 
the soles of his boots bore impressions of the pedals." 



George Singer, of England, the founder and head 
of the great corporation which bore his name, died 
recently in London at the early age of sixty-one. 
He was a pioneer in the bicycle industry. He early 
made a name for the manufacture of high-class bicy- 
cles, and the Singer Challenge ordinary with trailing 
brake will be remembered by many of our readers. 
He was one of those who, by his ability, energy, and 



4 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

integrity, rose from the very lowest rung of the 
ladder to a position of great wealth and influence. 
He was represented in America by the late Wm. B. 
Everett, of Boston. 



Louis Rubinstein, one of our old timers (L. A. W. 
184) is an accomplished skater as well as a rider of 
the wheel. He has just been elected President of 
the International Skating Union of America. As a 
skater in winter and a wheelman in summer he has 
solved the problem of rapid transit the year round. 



Elbert Hubbard, speaking of the folly of gam- 
bling, says that if four men start in to play poker 
with $10 each, or $1,000 each, it is just a matter of 
mathematical calculation when all of them will have 
nothing. It will thus be seen that Fra Elbertus pos- 
sesses a practical as well as a theoretical knowledge 
of the winning qualities of the kitty. 



During the recent Automobile Show at Madison 
Square Garden, in New York, official announcement 
was made that 2,227 cars were sold for $6,763,000. 
A lot of money to blow in. It will soon be blown 
out. 



President 'Roosevelt's message upon the Improve- 
ment of Country Life puts great emphasis upon the 
need for good roads. He recommends "The estab- 
lishing of a highway engineering service, or equiva- 
lent organization, to be at the call of the states in 
working out effective and economical highway sys- 
tems." We are getting on. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK E 

It is reported that there are twenty bicycle clubs 
in New York City and but two automobile clubs. 



Captain John E. Harder, L. A. W. No. 241, has 
been chosen burgess of the borough of Clearfield, 
Pa. He is one of the Pennsylvania workers for the 
L. A. W. from way back. 



It is safe to wager that anyone except a blind man 
cannot stand without support of any kind for five 
minutes, if he is thoroughly blindfolded, without 
moving his feet. If he does not move his feet he is 
pretty sure to topple over in about a minute. 



Mr. W. A. Russell has resigned his position as 
Secretary of the C. T. C. to accept a position on a 
leading daily paper. The Gazette says of him : 

"The rare combination and tact and caution with 
enthusiasm and energy enabled him ever to steer a 
steady and progressive course, and his personal 
qualities were such as to endear him to all. Mr. 
Russell came to us from journalism, and to journal- 
ism he returns — such is the seductive charm of that 
relentless mistress, who seldom allows her slaves to 
entirely escape from her toils. We personally have 
to acknowledge a great indebtedness to our col- 
league for many a kindly hint and much actual as- 
sistance in the production of the Gazette. It is no 
easy task that devolves on the new Council to find a 
successor to Mr. Russell, but in that search we must 
wish them the same good fortune as befell their 
predecessors in October, 1907." 



6 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

State Engineer Skene of New York says that the 
road construction methods of the past "will not meet 
the requirements of the future or even of the pres- 
ent." He declares that "either the traffic which pro- 
duces this disastrous result must be restricted, or 
new methods of construction, however expensive, 
must be used." Surface treatment is only a tem- 
porary protective. Is the science of road building 
complete? Greater durability is necessary, even if 
mileage is reduced. 



The mid-winter reunion of past and present mem- 
bers of the Rhode Island Division, L. A. W., took 
place at Westminster Hotel on February 9 last. A 
jolly time was had with reminiscences and stories. 
Nothing like getting together. 



Agent — I am introducing a new typewriter, a neat 
little thing you can take in your lap. 

Author — Not for me! I'm a married man. 

Kansas City Journal: A good roads meeting was 
held in Linn county the other day. "Not many at- 
tended," was the report of a newspaper, "because of 
the bad roads." 



The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that 
spanks the child. 



Wilbur Wright gets $600 a lesson for instructions 
in aeronautics. That is more than he used to get 
for teaching beginners to ride the wheel; but then 
he has learned to go up. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK . 7 

The good parson was summoned for driving his 
automobile beyond the speed limit. 

"Now," said the magistrate, "you say you were 
going at only eighteen miles an hour, but the con- 
stable still declares you were traveling at thirty. 
Now, I don't like to doubt either of you. Can you 
think why he declares you were going at that rate? 
Is there any grudge he owes you?" 

"No," replied the clergyman, "no, I can't think of 
anything — unless it is that I married him three years 



What has become of the advocates of steel roads? 
There were many such in the early days of the good 
roads movement. Flat steel rails slightly curved 
were claimed to be the most economical road to 
build and to keep in repair. If good for the cycle 
how much better for the auto. 



Burley B. Avers, of Chicago, was seen at the New 
York Auto Show. He was one of the jolly, hard- 
working men of the old times. He is now way up in 
the councils of the Steel Trust and we seldom hear 
from him or of him. 



T. N. Coslett, inventor of the anti-rust process, 
•thus describes his invention: 

"The Coslett process consists essentially in the 
incorporation of phosphorus w T ith the surface of steel 
and iron, hence changing the chemical nature of the 
superfices. This chemical change only penetrates to 
approximately a thousandth part of an inch, yet this 
penetration (or rather combination) is sufficient to 



8 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

render the surface immune to rust under climatic 
influence. 

"The operations attending the process are of the 
simplest description, and can be negotiated by any 
intelligent workman. A rectangular vat and a Bun- 
sen burner comprise the apparatus, although on a 
large scale steam coils or fires are utilized. 

"The phosphorized solution is placed in the vat 
and brought to the boil. The steel or iron articles 
(clean) are then immersed in the liquid and allowed 
to remain for two and a half or three hours, the so- 
lution meanwhile being retained at boiling point. 
The articles are then withdrawn, rapidly dried, and 
subsequently oiled. The process is then complete." 



Boston Bicycle Club. — The thirty-first annual 
dinner of the Boston Bicycle Club was eaten at 
Hendries', Feb. 13. The eatables included mammoth 
saddles of mutton, huge joints of roast beef, deep 
apple pie and scrod smothered in rum-tum-tiddies. 
No one arose hungry from the feast. The post- 
prandials were appreciated. Frank Weston re- 
sponded to the toast of the Boston Club for the 
thirty-first time. Quincy Kilby read verses of a per- 
sonal nature with a singing refrain which the com- 
pany helped along; Charles C. Ryder sang a bass 
solo; Mr. Sibley read several monologues and Abbot 
Bassett read verses. Fifty men were present, includ- 
ing 6 from New York, 3 from Providence and 1 from 
New Hampshire. There was not a dull moment. 
J. Rush Green was chairman in charge, assisted by 
Quincy Kilby and Win. H. Edmands. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 9 

FRANK WILLIAM WESTON. 

The Father of cycling in America ("Papa" we all call 
him) was not the first to ride the wheel on this side of the 
water, but he was the first man to see a great future for 
cycling in this country and to set on foot a movement to 
exploit the new vehicle and to organize those who went in 
for the new sport. He had an interesting career before he 
became interested in the wheel, and this portion of his life 
has never before been written up, although his cycling his- 
tory has repeatedly been printed. 

He was born at Oxford Terrace, London, W., England, 
July 13, 1843; was educated at private schools, and was 
graduated at Doctor Pearce's, Westbourne Grove School. 
He then became an articled pupil with James H. Rowley, 
an architect, pupil of Sir William Tite. and afterwards ar- 
chitect to the city of London. As an articled pupil he had 
to pay £500 premium and serve without compensation. 
He remained with Rowley for a year or more, and then 
established himself in a modest way on his own account. 

He was, in his pre-wheeling days, a persistent and en- 
thusiastic yachtsman and eventually became so skilled in 
his knowledge of the courses and currents that "the stick" 
was recognized as his right anywhere between the Nore 
and the Channel Islands. In later days, in this country, 
when he became Commodore of the Dorchester (now the 
Boston) Yacht Club, the skill, which had clung to him from 
his earlier days, often stood him in good stead. 

Mr. Weston was taken with the emigration fever in 1866 
and went down to the London docks to pick out a vessel 
in which to cross the ocean. He wanted a stanch and trim 
craft, and it mattered little whither she was bound. His 
i:rst choice was a very fine barque bound for British Co- 
lumbia via Cape Horn, and on this he engaged his passage. 
A family affliction held him in England beyond the time jf 
sailing, and on his return to London he once more began 
to look about for an acceptable craft. This time the 900- 
ton, full-rigged ship "Armstrong," hailing from Windsor, 
N. S., commanded by Captain Armstrong, and bound for 
Boston, attracted his attention, and on her he eventually 
sailed, the sole cabin passenger. 

On June 1, 1866, after an interesting, though stormy 
passage of 45 days, he landed at Constitution Wharf, 
Boston. 



10 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

His first monetary transaction consisted of exchanging 
a £10 Bank of England note for United States currency. 
It was before the resumption of specie payments and he 
received gold value $88. 

After a few days devoted to sight seeing he went to work 
in Boston for W. R. Emerson, an architect, whose office 
was in the Studio building. 

On July 4, 1866, occurred the great fire at Portland, Me., 
and this led to a good demand for architects in the rebuild- 
ing of the city. Weston went to Portland and allying him- 
self with the staff of W. H. Fassett, afterwards the city 
architect, plunged at once into professional work on the 
new buildings of the burned district. 

After tw r o years at Portland he returned to Boston and 
entered the office of N. J. Bradlee, where he remained 
about a year. 

Started in architectural practice for himself in 1869. The 
next year he took into partnership Mr. George D. Rand 
and the firm of Weston & Rand commenced business. 
Soon afterwards he was called back to London by the death 
of his mother. 

Remained in England 18 months and then returned to 
Boston. On this visit he met at Coventry the lady who 
later became his wife. When he got back in Boston he 
found the Back Bay district of the city in process of devel- 
opment. This gave plenty of opportunity for his talent, 
and in the work of constructing the. fine buildings which 
adorn that part of the city he had no inconsiderable share. 

It was in 1873 that he again returned to England. This 
time it was to marry and his stay was but for a short time. 

Many of us have very pleasant memories of the hospit- 
able home of the Westons at Savin Hill. The house was 
from plans drawn by Weston and it was decidedly unique 
and "Westonesque." It overlooked Boston Bay and the 
front yard was the wave-washed shore. Openhanded hospi- 
tality was the rule of the house and "Welcome and "Come 
again" were the greetings. 

Plunging once more into business life Weston hired the 
whole upper floor of the George C. Richardson Building 
at 178 Devonshire street, Boston. He selected rooms for 
himself and sublet the rest. There was one very large room 
for which he could get nc customer. The bicycle was just 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 11 

coming in. The two bicycles sent over for exhibition at the 
Philadelphia Centennial in 1876 had sent the thoughts of 
many people in the direction of the wheel and now, in 1877, 
Chandler, Dalton and other Pioneers, were riding. It oc- 
curred to Weston that this large room would make a good 
bicycle riding school, and in a very short time the wheels 
were spinning and luckless riders were taking headers. 

This was the first entry of Weston into the sport of 
bicycling, with which he has ever since been so closely 
identified. During his career as an architect he acted pro- 
fessionally upon many public and private buildings in and 
out of Boston. One of his most notable works was the 
Massachusetts Insane Hospital at Worcester, one of the 
most attractive and substantial buildings in the State. This 
great building has a water-table one mile and twenty feet 
in length, a dimension which has not often, if ever, been 
exceeded. 

But we can well believe that Weston looks upon his 
record as a wheelman as the proudest of his life. He is 
today the most familiar figure in cycling life and he fills a 
very large place in the hearts of wheelmen everywhere. 

As a promoter of "first things" his record is unique. 

He started the first bicycle paper in America — The Amer- 
ican Bicycling Journal, first issued Dec. 22, 1877. 

He was instrumental in organizing the first bicycle club 
in America — The Boston Bicycle Club, Feb. 11, 1878, 14 
members. 

He was the first and still remains the representative in 
America of the C. T. C, of England, originally the Bicycle 
Touring Club. 

He was the earliest Starter of the bicycle races in the 
early days of wheeling and he started all the races of that 
time. 

He started the first one hundred mile bicycle club run 
and also the first hundred mile tricycle club run held in this 
country. 

He organized the first club run and extended tour of any 
accredited body of cyclists m America. It was on May 22, 
1880, that five members of the Boston Bicycle Club (called 
the "Fortunate Five"), consisting of Frank W. Weston, 
Tosiah S. Dean, T. N. Hastings, of Boston; Dr. J. F. 
Adams of Worcester and G. C. Thomas of Harrisville, Pa., 



12 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

started on a bicycle run and tour through Great Britain. 
They were received with lavish hospitality by the wheelmen 
of our Mother Country. The kindly welcomes and the 
whole-souled greetings of our English cousins to the visit- 
ors have set a mark for their descendants which it is hardly 
likely will ever be equalled. The five wheeled together in 
England for forty-five days. 

On the nth of September, 1879, Weston, in conjunction 
with the late Charles E. Pratt and the late Edward C. 
Hodges participated with forty-five others in the first 
Wheel About the Hub, which has since been made an an- 
nual fixture of the Boston Bicycle Club, and of all that 
company that circled the Hub in 1879, Weston is the only 
one found in the ranks at the present time. 

He established the first importing house for bicycles in 
America. It was first known as Cunningham, Heath & Co., 
the two men whose names appear being the financial men 
of the firm. Later the firm was incorporated as the Cun- 
ningham Co. The firm did a good business for many years 
until the American bicycle improved and, protected by a 
tariff of 35 per cent., drove the English wheel out of the 
market. 

For two years he has occupied the position of First Vice 
President of the League of American Wheelmen, and he 
was for two years President of the Pioneers of the L. A. W. 

After leaving the cycle business Weston went back to 
architecture and has engaged largely in specialty work. 
He tried his hand at houseboats, but America was not in 
the mood for such things; and now he is giving his atten- 
tion to bungalows. Of these he has built many in the 
country places around Boston. 

Frank W. Weston is a man universally beloved; warm 
hearted, generous, companionable; and now as age steals 
on he has many pleasant memories to cherish, many good 
times and pleasant occasions to recall and none of these 
more potent and ever green than those which are con- 
nected with the wheel and its devotees. We may well say 
that he is, First at the Wheel, First in the Club and First 
in the hearts of the Wheelmen of the Hub. 



An expert says that Hains suffered from "circular 
insanity." Same as wheels, probably. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 13 

ASSEMBLY DELEGATES. 

In accordance with Section 3, Article V of the Constitu- 
tion, I appoint the following as delegates to the National 
Assembly of the League of American Wheelmen, to be held 
at Boston, Massachusetts, on September 9, 1909. 

It is my desire that as many as possible of those named 
should attend and thus do their share toward the important 
work of preserving wheelmen's rights, and also to aid in 
the improvement of roads in the United States, which are 
the two great objects of the League's existence. I am 
anxious to have the unselfish and self-denying support of 
all the members during the coming year, and shall be much 
pleased to receive suggestions tending to increase the use- 
fulness of the organization. 

Appointees: Iowa 1, J. F. Rail, Cedar Rapids, la.; Mary- 
land 1, James S. Reese, Baltimore. 
Fraternally, 

Walter M. Meserole, 

President. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 12. 1909. 



ANNUAL ELECTION. 
In view of the fact that in no case is there more than one 
nomination for the office of Representative, it seems un- 
necessary to go to the expense and trouble of an election 
by mail. 

In pursuance therefore of the authority invested in me, 
I now declare the several members who have been nomi- 
nated, to be duly elected, and I am anxious that as many 
as are able to arrange their plans to that end, will attend 
the National Assembly at Boston, Massachusetts, on Sep- 
tember 9, 1909. 

Fraternally, 

Walter M. Meserole, 

President. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1909. 



PLEDGES FROM LIFE MEMBERS. 
I agree to pay the sum set against my name yearly on 
the first day of January for five successive years to enable 
the League of American Wheelmen to continue its good 



14 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

work and to maintain an official magazine devoted to the 
interests of the organization. This agreement to be void 
in case of my death. 

In response to the circular sent out by the Ways and 
Means Committee we have had, up to Feb. 25, the follow- 
ing pledges: 

C. M. Fairchild, Chicago $2.00 

H. E. Fisher, Atlanta, Ga 1.00 

G. Y. McCracken, Philadelphia 1.00 

G. A. Gorgas, Harrisburg, Pa 1.00 

L. P. Case, Winsted, Conn 1.00 

Allen Hammond, Rockville, Conn 1.00 

M. M. Belding, Jr., New York 5.00 



JOINED IN 1885. 

A list of those who joined the League, of American 
Wheelmen in 1885 and are still in good standing. 

1885. 
244 — Victor B. Tulane, Cawker City, Kan., Jan. 8. 
245— George F. Titus, Norwalk, O., Jan. 8. 
246 — George C. Pennell, New York, Jan. 29. 
247 — H. G. Latimer, Wilmington, N. C, Feb. 26. 
248 — C. E. Lauren, Peoria, 111., Feb. 26, 
249 — J. F. Rail, Cedar Rapids, la., April 9. 
250 — Frank A. Post, Le Mars, la., April 9. 
251 — F. H. Garrigues, Philadelphia, Pa., April 16. 
252 — Hubert D. Powers, Grand Rapids, Minn., April 16. 
256 — James H. Noyes, Orange, N. J., May 23. 
257— J. W. Merritt, Thayer. W. Va., May 30. 
258 — A. F. Bellinger, Stamford, Conn., June 4. 
259 — I. Clarence Marsh, Chicago, 111., June 4. 
262 — J. P. Simmons, Philadelphia, Pa., June 11. 
265 — F. M. Vandling. Scranton, Pa., June 18. 
266 — Thomas Hare, Philadelphia, Pa., June 18. 
267 — Eugene A. Hall, Meriden, Conn., June 18. 
269 — George G. Teller, Cranford, N. J., June 25. 
271 — David H. Ludlow, Philadelphia, Pa., June 25. 
272 — H. H. Ludlow, Philadelphia, Pa., June 25. 
273 — H. G. Redfield, New Haven, Conn., July 2. 
275— Chas. E. Burr. Bordentown, N. J., July 9. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 15 

276 — E. W. Hope, Sherman, Tex., July 9. 

277 — Aug. Henke, Schenectady, N. Y., July 9. 

278— E. A. De Blois, Wethersfield, Conn., July 16. 

279— E. W. Barnes, Perth Amboy, N. J., July 16. 

281— O. C. Smith, Los Angeles, Cal., July 16. 

282 — E. E. Mead, Springfield, Mass., July 23. 

284 — Chas. W. Pierce, Brighton, Mass., July 23. 

286— J. B. Kaercher, Pittsburgh, Pa., Aug. 6. 

287 — A. C. Stewart, St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 6. 

2 88_ Walter. G. Denn : Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 6. 

288a — Chas. Denn. Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 6. 

289 — R. L. Stewart, Cocoanut Grove, Fla., Aug. 13. 

290 — W. J. Leacock, Jr., Chicago, 111., Aug. 27. 

291— Edgar S. Barnes, Springfield, 111., Aug. 27. 

293 — J. A. Clark, Halifax, N. S., Aug. 27. 

295 — C. L. Nichols, New York, Sept. 4. 

206 — Lewis H. Hutton, Nanuet, N. Y., Sept. 14. 

298— W. W. Sisson, Binghamton, N. Y., Sept. 18. 

299 — L. O. Macdaniel, Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 18. 

300 — Dr. Wm. H. Emery, Roxbury, Mass., Oct. 2. 

301 — Geo. -R. Comings, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 2. 

303 — Or. A. F. Wyman. New Bedford, Mass., Dec. 18. 

305— Mrs. L. H. Porter, East Orange, N. J., Dec. 18. 

306 — Chas. F. Feurer, Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 18. 

307— Chas. S. Davol, North Attleboro, Mass., Dec. 18. 

308 — R. F. Shannon, Pittsburg, Pa., Dec. 18. 

311 — Richard Dallett, Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 25. 



Let us know what wheelmen are doing in your 
city. Put a few spokes in our wheel. 

The attention of Thomas A. Edison is respectfully 
called to the statistics showing that there are more 
than twenty million horses in this country. It will 
be remembered he said the horse must go. Nor will 
the bicycle go. Good things will not down. 



We saw the other day an automobile ofTal carrier. 
'To what base uses, etc." 



" The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it — FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTER FOR 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Bassett'S Scrap Book 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-$l. 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch! 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 2 APRIL, igog 5 Cents 



IN THE SPRING EVERYTHING RENEWS. 



'Tis a poor road that won't work both ways. 



Poets of the wheel are born, not paid. 



To join is dutiful; to renew divine. 



This is the time when wheelmen harken back to 
the old time getting out time. 



Even if we could see ourselves as others see us 
many of us would not stop to look. 



"In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns 
to thoughts of love;" in the spring a young man's 
looking for a silent steed to shove. 



The Newton Bicycle Club held its annual meeting 
(the 195th meeting) and banquet on April ioth. Of- 
ficers elected; President, Albert M. Beers; Vice 
President, Herbert A. Fuller; Secretary, Abbot Bas- 
sett. Voted to hold the annual summer run and 
meeting at the club farm, Amherst, N. H., in July. 



18 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

We are getting in quite a lot of young blood. 
The old fellows are putting in substitutes to take up 
the work. Have you put your son in? Come early 
and avoid the rush. 



It is the proper thing for Boston wheelmen to 
ride to Lexington on Paul Revere Day, April 19. 
We make it a holiday in Massachusetts, having put 
it in the place of the Fast Day that was. A fast 
day on the wheel is better than a fast day in the 
stomach. 



April has been chosen as a birth month by very 
many of the good and great men of history. 
Thomas Jefferson, 2 ; Washington Irving, 3 ; William 
E. Channing, 7; penry Clay, 12; John Lothrop 
Motley, 15; Samuel F. B. Morse, 27; U. S. Grant, 
2J; James Monroe, 28; William Shakespeare, 23; 
Walter M. Meserole, 5; M. M. Belding, Jr., 14. 



This is the time to think, and, while you are think- 
ing, please think to renew. Wouldn't it be a good 
thing to brag of if we could show a clean sheet of 
renewals? but we can't. Better do it now. Come 
early and avoid the rush. 



We shall renumber in the fall and every one will 
have a small number. When the numbers begin to 
fall we all like it and we all regret it. 



At the 1 8th international Cyclists' Congress, at 
which 13 nationalities were represented, it was re- 
solved that the championship of the world should be 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 19 

decided at Copenhagen, Aug. 15, 19 and 22, and 
that in the following year the same contests should 
be held at Brussels. It was further decided not in 
future to participate in international Olympic con- 
tests owing to the absence of adequate control of 
these games from the sporting point of view. 



The Chicago minister who retired Monday from 
his pastorate and from the Christian ministry, ex- 
plained to his congregation: "To give my children 
the education I think they should have, and my wife 
the opportunity she desires in her line of work, I 
need $10,000 a year. I cannot get it in the church. 
I am going where I can." Others who may have a 
similar ambition will be interested to note that he 
is going to sell automobiles now. 



The Optimist club's idea of changing the first of 
April from a day of tricks and jokes to a day "de- 
voted to the sunny philosophy of optimism and the 
milk of human kindness" is sweet, but there is 
danger that the optimists who believe that they will 
be able to stop the April-foolers will be April-fooled. 



The latest statistics show that the number of 
horses in the United States is 20,640,000, an in- 
crease over last year of 648,000. It will thus be 
seen that the automobiles are not yet the whole 
blooming thing. 



Now comes the word that the "pneumatic pompa- 
dour" is to take the place of the old-fashioned "rat." 
This suggests a use for old bicycle tires. 



20 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

William A. Austin, of Winthrop, Mass., died at 
his home in Winthrop on March 7. Mr. Austin 
constructed the first steam carriage and the first 
■steam bicycle. At the time of his death he was at 
work perfecting a gasoline lamp, to handle which a 
company of New York men headed by ex-Gov. 
Black and backed by John D. Rockefeller had been 
formed. Upon the completion of this invention Mr. 
Austin was to receive $250,000, but the secret goes 
with him to the grave. 

At the beginning of the civil war Austin com- 
pleted his first invention, that of a steam carriage. 
Later he constructed another steam carriage and 
this is now in Lowell. Only a few months ago Mr. 
Austin was offered a large touring car by an auto-, 
mobile company for his first steam carriage, but he 
refused the proposition. He made considerable 
money exhibiting the carriage during the war. A 
few years later he invented his steam bicycle, which 
is now at his Winthrop home. In a race with a 
horse Mr. Austin rode this machine for one mile in 
53 seconds. 



The easiest way to make money used to be to 
invent something for 50 cents to put on a bicycle. 
Now it is to invent something for $15 to go on a 
motor car. 



"Dust Preventives," by Prevost Hubbard, issued 
as Bulletin No. 34, United States Office of Public 
Roads, is the latest contribution to literature on 
road construction and maintenance. Mr. Hubbard's 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 21 

paper has been prepared to meet the growing de- 
mand by road engineers for specific information on 
the important subject of dust prevention. 



Walking. Chapter One. — In ordinary walking, a 
man's lower extremity swings essentially by its own 
weight, requiring little muscular effort to help it. 
So heavy a body easily overcomes all impediments 
from clothing, even in the sex least favored in its 
costume. But if a man's legs are pendulums, then 
a short man's legs will swing quicker than a tall 
man's, and he will take more steps to a minute, 
other things being equal. Thus there is a natural 
rhythm to a man's walk, depending on the length 
of his legs, which beat more or less rapidly as they 
are longer or shorter, like metronomes differently 
adjusted, or the pendulums of different time-keep- 
ers. 



By the will of the late Eugene Tompkins, for 
whom he has been private secretary for many 
years, Quincy Kilby, of Boston, comes in for a 
legacy of $25,000, all taxes paid. Most cordial re- 
lations have always existed between Mr. Tompkins 
and his secretary and in this most generous manner 
has the employer given evidence of his esteem. Mr. 
Kilby and his daughter will spend the summer in 
Europe. 



The Union Co. Roadsters of Rahway, N. J., 
organized Aug. 11, 1890, kept open house at their 
new rooms on March 22 and entertained many 



22 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

friends. The organization is one of the oldest in 
the State, and has on its roll many of the most 
prominent citizens of Rahway. 



"Gentlemen, if that foe so — and I speak to men 
who are capable of saying of their own experience 
whether it is so or not — then I say there has not 
been a more civilizing invention in the memory of 
the present generation than the invention of the 
cycle, open to all classes, enjoyed by both sexes 
and by all ages. The cycle gives us health, it gives 
us variety, it is less dependent upon external cir- 
cumstances, upon pecuniary means, upon prelim- 
inary organization, than almost any other sport with 
which I am acquainted. Those are great qualities. 
Those are qualities which are spreading the use o£ 
the cycle wider and wider amid all classes of the 
community." — Mr. A. J. Balfour, of England, at the 
N. C. U. banquet in '98. 



For sheer simplicity of phrase and conception 
few have surpassed that delightful old lady who, 
with a shrewd twinkle in her eye, inquired whether 
" 'soda-water' should be written as two separate 
words, or if there should be a syphon between 
them?" 



A South Carolina legislator advocates the enact- 
ment of a law making it a misdemeanor for a man 
to scratch a match on the seat of his trousers. He 
should be awarded a prize for the most original 
fool idea incubated during the present legislative 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 23 

season. Men have many rights that women can- 
not well enjoy and these they must retain. 



The wind in a bicycle tire is a cycle-own when 
it gets away. There's a paradox for you. 



The New York Athletic Club has appointed a 
special bicycle committee for 1909. This committee 
will afford all possible assistance to any Club 
members desiring trustworthy information concern- 
ing machines, roads, and locations; and give its 
untiring attention to the welfare of cycling in 
general. Three mileage medals will be given for 
riding greatest distances during the year 1909. To 
promote social riding, all wheelmen are requested 
to leave a notice, beforehand, as to their intended 
destination and time of starting, upon the wheel 
room blackboard. McGinley of Boston is behind 
this New York movement, and the members really 
ride. 



Wanted a quadricyle with oak frame and wooden 
wheels, not unlike the one that Elliott put out in 
the '90s. Give it a power equipment no greater 
than the present motor-cycle has. Have the rider 
sit easily on a seat that will be so shaped that the 
rider can pedal what little he has to. We shall then 
have an inexpensive auto for one rider and no get- 
ting off at every stop. Not so good as a one-track 
cycle on a hard road, but then, this is the era of 
good roads. In many respects the Elliott quadri- 
cycle was a good thing. It was weak in that it 
lacked the crank action and ball bearings so potent 



24 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

in giving success to the bicycle. We believe the 
new 1 idea would take and we charge nothing for it. 



Subscriptions to our maintenance fund are still 
coming in. Once more we have evidence of the 
loyalty and patriotism of the old-timers. Isn't it 
an inspiration? Isn't it very much better than the 
time when politics was on top and every national 
assembly was a crisis and every meet a struggle 
leading up to the crisis. Although the appeal was 
made to Life Members very many of the annuals 
are taking part. 



The Associated Cycling Clubs of Philadelphia, 
incorporated, has surrendered its charter and turned 
over its treasury funds to the newly organized 
Veteran Wheelmen's Association. The A. C. C. 
was organized in March, 1888. Now that there is 
no further use for its existence according to the 
original objects of its charter and in view of the 
fact that the newly-formed Veteran Association has 
taken up the one reason for the holding together of 
the old association all these years, the executive 
committee urged dissolution and the abandonment 
of the charter, all of which was agreed to at a subse- 
quent meeting of such of the old delegates as could 
be assembled. Thus one more cycling institution 
goes out of business, but they all hold together in 
friendly relations. 



A young motorist, endeavoring to convince a 
country innkeeper that the decay of coaching was 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 25 

more than compensated for by the spread of motor- 
ing as a pastime, exclaimed, as a final argument, 
that his car was of forty horsepower, "the equal, 
sir, of ten relays of coach horses." 

The next morning he read in his bill, "To feeding 
and stabling, 80 shillings." 

He asked the landlord for an explanation. 

"The charge for 'osses is 2 shillin' a 'ead, sir," 
was the reply. "That machine of yours is equal to 
forty 'osses, which is 80 shillin'." — London Express. 



By a mail vote of the members of the C. T. C. it 
has been decided to retain the amount of Ernest 
R. Shipton's pension at the sum fixed in conven- 
tion, £78. The friends of Mr. Shipton hoped to 
make it ^150, but the membership voted 4,294 for 
the smaller amount and 2,003 f° r the larger. The 
C. T. C. membership reported for 1908 was 23,496, 
a decline of 4,121 from the figures of 1907. There 
are others. 



Germany has advanced a claim to the possession 
of the oldest living cyclist. He is Gerd Rade, age 
90 years. 

Caller — So sorry to hear of your motor accident. 
Enthusiastic Motorist — Oh, thanks, it's nothing. 
Expect to live through many more. 
Caller— Oh, I trust not!— Tit-Bits. 



Julius G. Linsley, of Oswego, N. Y., writes: "You will 
doubtless question the statement I am about to make, but 
nevertheless I will venture it. At the time I bought the 



26 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Life Membership it was my hope and intention to send 
in my dollar each year, notwithstanding. However, about 
that time I became very busy paying for the education of 
my son and daughter; so busy in fact that it was a nov- 
elty to find the price in my jeans, and I cannot now say 
that I have fully recovered. 

"I send you sufficient to cover the back years, and also 
a subscription to same for a friend. I take exception to 
the statement you made that the life memberships were 
taken out by the 'flower of the flock.' It was a purely 
business proposition, and as such looked good, and was 
so accepted by me, and doubtless by the majority of those 
who accepted it. It meant that my membership was secured 
for all time. I maintain that the 'flower of the flock' are 
those who have continued to pay their yearly dollar up to 
the present time, 'more power to them,' and you will 
doubtless find a goodly number of them coming to the 
front in this emergency. 

"Now I really cannot make any promise of what I will 
do to assist in supporting 'our organ,' but I shall endeavor 
to do something, and I can only say that I hope and trust 
that both it and its genial editor may be spared to us for 
many years, and that you will not lose by it." 



Abner T. Jones, Philadelphia, Pa., writes: "Enclosed 
please find one dollar ($i), for which send me a member- 
ship card in the good old League. I wish to remain in the 
ranks as long as there is a member in it. I am 63 years old 
and I ride every day, weather permitting, and hope to keep 
it up for some time to come. I frequently ride to Atlantic 
City and return. I would suggest through the Scrap Book 
that a meeting of 10 or more members be called in every 
town in every state to see if we cannot get back to where 
we were a few years ago. Wheeling is improving in Phila- 
delphia considerably. Hoping to hear from some of the 
old timers I am truly yours." 



Veteran writes: "Now that League members are not 
as many as they were would it not be a good idea for us 
all to show our colors when on the wheel? The old-time 
handle-bar ribbon was a good thing. Let every rider 
who is a member get one if they are still to be had, and 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 27 

show it when on the road. We have much to be proud of, 
those of us who still hold to the League and we should 
not hesitate to show our colors." 

[A good idea. We will send an embroidered silk handle- 
bar ribbon 18 inches long to any member who will send 
two cents for return postage. Or we will enclose one with 
ticket to any member who asks for it upon renewal. Abbot 
Bassett, Secretary.] 



PLEDGES FROM LIFE MEMBERS. 

I agree to pay the sum set against my name yearly on 
the first day of January for five successive years to enable 
the League of American Wheelmen to continue its good 
work and to maintain an official .magazine devoted to the 
interests of the organization. This agreement to be void 
in case of my death. , 

In response to the circular sent out by the Ways and 
Means Committee we have had up to March 29, the follow- 
ing pledges: 

P. J. Vetter, Scranton, Pa., paid in full $1.00 

A. D. Wait, Cohoes, N. Y 1.00 

Frederick McOwen, Philadelphia 5.00 

Julius G. Linsley, Oswego, N. Y 1.00 

And one dollar paid for each past year of life mem- 
bership ($7) and one new member ($1). 



JOINED IN 1886. 
A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1886 and are still in good standing. 

313 — Carl Hering, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 1. 
314 — A. P. Cosand, Newlin, La., Jan. 8. 
315— C W. Baldwin, Orange, N. J., Jan. 8. 
317— R. L. Calkins, Yonkers, N. Y., Jan. 8. 
3I 8— Walter H. Chubb, Cleveland, O,. Jan. 8. 
319 — Thomas Hockley, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 8. 
322 — Arthur P. Benson, Dedham, Mass., Jan. 15. 
323 — Thomas Whitaker, Millville, N. J., Jan. 15. 
325 — Wm. E. Metzger, Detroit, Mich., Jan. 29. 
326 — Samuel E. Snyder, Clearfield, Pa., Jan. 29. 



28 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

327— S. H. Tripp, Peoria, 111., Feb. 5. 

328 — E. H. Croninger, Covington, Ky., Feb. 5. 

329 — Chas. E. Herrick, Northampton, Mass., Feb. 5. 

330 — Chas. E. Minnemyer, Allegheny, Pa., Feb. 5. 

333— Isaac B. Potter, Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 12. 

334 — Howard B. Raymond, Akron, O., Feb. 12. 

335— Ed. L. Fry, Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 12. 

336 — Wm. J. Emerson, Somerville, Mass., Feb. 19. 

338 — Theodore Rothe, Roxbury, Mass., Feb. 26. 

340-^Wm. M. Honig, Albany, N. Y., March 5. 

341 — Samuel V. Hoffman, Morristown, N. J., March 5. 

342 — Edward A. Hemmenway, Dorchester, Mass., March 12. 

343 — Henry W. Robinson, Newton, Mass., March 12. 

344 — Chas. M. Croninger, Covington, Ky., March 12. 

348— J. S. Briggs, Rochester, N. Y., March 19. 

349— A. H. Brunner, Cleveland, O., March 19. 

350 — John A. Lowe, Worcester, Mass., March 26. 

351 — Sterling Elliott, Newton, Mass., March 26. 

352— Wm. A. Denn, Philadelphia, Pa., March 26. 

354— Fred A. Bliss, Warren, R. L, March 26. 

360— E. R. Grant, Elizabeth, N. J., April 16. 

362 — Alvah G. Fisher, New Haven, Conn., April 23. 

363 — George Burroughs, Boston, Mass., April 23. 

364 — Frank Stevens, San Francisco, Cal., April 30. 

365— Everett E. Arnold, East Hartford, Conn., April 30. 

367 — Chas. E. Walker, Hartford, Conn., April 30. 

368 — Nelson H. Gibbs, Providence, R. I., April 30. 

369 — Wm. McD. Lee, Lyndhurst, Va., April 30. 

370 — Frank H. Shute, Gloucester, Mass., May 7. 

371— Welcome W. Braden, N. Y. City, May 7. 

372— A. A. Taltavall, Philadelphia, Pa., May 7. 

373— Alfred C. Mason, Philadelphia, Pa., May 7. 

374— Chas. F. West, Duluth, Minn., May 14. 

375— W. H. Wright, Charlestown, Mass., May 14. 

376 — Chas. A. Lindsley, Orange, N. J., May 14. 

377 — Wm. J. Owrid, Camden, N. J., May 14. 

379— F. J. Cheney, Wilmington, Del., May 14. 

380 — Henry Crowther, Philadelphia, Pa., May 14. 

382 — Hugh Hartshorne, Jersey City, N. J., May 21. 

383— Anzi T. Dodd, East Orange, N. J., May 21. 

384 — Fred'k E. Langstroth, Montclair, N. J., May 21. 

387— W. K. Kellogg, Battle Creek, Mich., May 28. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 29 

389— Michael Furst, Brooklyn, N. Y., May 28. 

39.0— Wilhelm Kaffenberger,, Buffalo, N. Y., May 28. 

391 — Calvin K. Rieman, Ft. Wayne, Ind., June 4. 

392 — A. W. Robinson, Newton, Mass., June 11. 

393 — John M. Zook, Philadelphia, Pa., June 11. 

394 — George H. Frost, Pasadena, Cal. 

395 — Fred B. King, Bridgeport, Conn., June 18. 

397 — J. Win. Sheehan, N. Y. City, June 25. 

398 — Clarence D. Dunn, New Haven, Conn., July 2. 

400 — E. V. Sidell, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., July 9. 

401 — Chas. H. Howland, Providence, R. I., July 9. 

402 — Albert M. Embree, Stamford, Conn., July 16! 

405 — S. S. Simon, Orville, Cal., July 30. 

4 o6— W. C. H. Vogel, Cleveland, O., Aug. 6. 

407 — L. W. Earle, Tomah, Wis., Aug. 6. 

408 — Frank N. Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 13. 

409 — Robert W. Matthews, Lock Haven, Pa., Aug. 13. 

411 — H. G. Wolzendorf, St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 3. 

412 — Frank L. Goodsell, Bridgeport, Conn., Sept. 17. 

413 — W. G. Speier, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 24. 

415 — J. M. Miller, Vacaville, Cal., Oct. 22. 

416— H. W. Arnold, Binghamton, N. Y., Oct. 22. 

417— Chas. H. McCully, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 29. 

419 — Orville Stillman, Westerly, R. I., Nov. 26. 

421 — L. L. Buchanan, Chicago, 111., Dec. 17. 

422 — H. W. Bullard, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dec. 17. 



"Where was Moses when the light went out?" 

Hiding on his bicycle and gliding all about; 

But in just another second, why a copper pulled him in, 

'Cause he hadn't tumbled off his wheel to light it up "agin." 



Now every sweet maiden rides out with her beau, 
And her choice of a husband reveals, 

And spinsters who cycle no jealousy know 
For they have their "hubs" on their wheels. 



"What's in a name? That which we call a rose 
By any other name would smell as sweet." 

And e'en a bicycle, or so we may suppose, 
By any other name would be as fleet. 



30 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

PERIODICAL LIST. 

We publish a list of such periodicals as will allow a dis- 
count to subscribers. Many magazines will not allow the 
list price to be cut. All such we do not schedule. Others 
will not allow price to be cut on a single subscription but 
will give a large discount when a club is formed. Note 
that many of the Periodicals below are designated by a 
letter or by Roman numerals. 

To form a club — Figure Class A at 65 cents; Class B at 
$i..35; Class C at 35 cents. The Roman numerals represent 
25 cents for each figure (VII means $1.75). If the club 
calls for three magazines add 35 cents to combined price. 
That is our profit. If four or more magazines, add 10 
cents for each magazine for our profit. 

Many of the Magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 

The first column gives list price; the second column, our 
price. 

Ainslee - . B 1.80 1.80 

American Boy A 1.00 1.00 

American Business Man VII 2.00 2.00 

American Machinist Weekly 4.00 3.80 

American Magazine A 1.00 1.00 

American Photography 1.50 1.35 

Appleton's IV 1.50 1.50 

Atlantic , 4-00 345 

Automobile IX 3.00 3.00 

Automobile Topics 2.00 1.75 

Baseball Magazine IV 1.50 1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Bohemian IV 1.50 1.50 

Bookman -.IX 2.50 2.50 

Book News Monthly Ill 1.00 .90 

Boston Cooking School A 1.00 1.00 

Burr Mcintosh VIII 3.00 3.00 

Busy Man's Magazine V 2.00 2.00 

Camera 1.00 .90 

Camera Craft A i.bo .90 

Century 4-00 385 

Children's Magazine (Mrs. Burnett) A 1.00 1.00 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 31 

Cosmopolitan A i.oo i.oo 

Country Life XII 4.00 4.00 

Current Literature . , IX 3.00 3.00 

Cycle & Auto Trade Journal B 2.00 1.60 

Etude for music lovers , . , IV 1.50 1.50 

Garden A 1.00 1.00 

Good Housekeeping A 1.00 1.00 

Green Bag . 4.00 3.75 

Harper Bazar A 1.00 .90 

Harper Magazine or Weekly 4.00 3.45 

Human Life 50 .40 

International Studio XVII 5.00 4.50 

Judge VIII 5.00 4.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 1.75 

Motor Car 1.00 .90 

Motor World 2.00 1.75 

North American Review XIV 4.00 3.75 

Outinr B 3.00 3.00 

Photo Era IV 1.50 1.50 

Photographer ^ 2.00 1.65 

Photographic Times IV 1.50 1.50 

Pictorial Review A 1.00 1.00 

Professional & Amateur Photography 1.00 .90 

Puck 5.00 4.25 

Reader B 3.00 2.25 

Recreation B 3.00 2.00 

Review of Reviews B 3.00 3.00 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 

Scientific American & Supplement 7.00 6.00 

Smart Set B 2.50 2.50 

Suburban Life B 3.00 3.00 

Success A 1.00 1.00 

Table Talk Ill 1.50 1.50 

Technical World IV 1.50 1.50 

World'* Work 3.00 3.00 



ABBOT BASSETT, Subscription Agent 
221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance " 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it — FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTER FOR 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-|l 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 3 MAY, 1909 5 Cents 



YOU MAY NOW RENEW. 

Don't estimate your pleasure by the mile. Not 
how many miles but how many restful hours. 



My wheel may bring me many a spill; with all its 
falls I love it still. 



Oratory is no more than talk with a dress suit on. 



Just at present the people of this country seem 
largely given over to warship worship. 



Mr. W. S. Burke is the new Secretary of the C. T. 
C. He was on duty for many years as Chief Consul 
of India. 



The tariff tinkers will not put up the tariff on 
bicycles, which has been 45 per cent., but they pro- 
pose putting tires in the same schedule and this 
means an increase on tires of 15 per cent. 



Fred A. Bliss, a well-known wheelman of Warren, 
R. I., has emigrated to San Diego, Cal. He writes 



34 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

of many pleasant memories of the old time and looks 
forward to many good times awheel in the future. 
With Fred Bliss at San Diego, Lincoln Holland at 
Los Angeles, and E. P. Burnham at Hemet, Massa- 
chusetts has contributed a group of husky wheelmen 
to California. 



Robert Gentle, many years Chief Consul of New 
Jersey, is still in the saddle. He renews and says: 

"Am with you as long as you can send the notice 
and I am here to receive it. Am still associating 
with the boys (and hope I always will) being the of- 
ficial timer for the Y. M. C. A. of our city. The Es- 
sex Bi Club is still in existence and holds its annual 
dinner this month." 



Our auditor, Geo. W. Nash, has been made as- 
sistant treasurer of the Abington Savings Bank. 



Our good friend Elliott Mason of Hartford, 
Conn., who was at Newport at the organization, may 
now be addressed as "Grandfather," and our senior 
lady member is a "Grandmother." We know all 
about it ourselves. 



The dear ladies of the D. A. R. wouldn't make it 
unanimous. We used to have some pretty hard 
fights in the L. A. W. but we always made it unani- 
mous. No matter how much you hate it, ladies, the 
thing to do is to make it unanimous under any and 
all circumstances. It merely adds to the pleasure of 
the conquerors if it is shown so plainly that the sting 
is felt. Mere man would have taken his dearest foe 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 35 

outside, express regret for him on account of the 
kicking he would be compelled to listen to, set 'em 
up and leave his opponent a little concerned as to 
whether he hadn't got the worst of it. Nothing like 
being pleasant in politics, and nothing like accepting 
defeat as though it was after all the best thing to 
have. 



Septuagenarian Weston has made the important 
discovery that his feet are not as young as they used 
to be. There are many others. 



The Roxbury (Mass.) Bicycle Club still lives. The 
annual dinner was held at the Quincy House, Bos- 
ton, on April 3. John J. Fecitt is the captain. 



The Danish Bicycle Club, of Copenhagen, which 
has in charge the promotion of the championships 
of the world for 1909, which will take place in 
Copenhagen, has announced the program. The 
professional 100 kilometers paced championship and 
the amateur sprint championship will be run on Sun- 
day, August 15. The 100 kilometers paced amateur 
championship and the trial heats of the professional 
sprint championship will occupy the program for 
Thursday, August 19. The only championship event 
for the last day, Sunday, August 22, will be the semi- 
final and final heats of the professional sprint cham- 
pionship, the distance of this event in both profes- 
sional and amateur categories being one mile. 



Chas. T. Harrop, vice president of the Wheel- 



36 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

men's Veteran Association of Philadelphia, sends his 
renewal, and writes: 

"Greetings ! Am still riding a 'Union' of 'way- 
back,' but have never had my wheel out of commis- 
sion since 1890, summer or winter. We'll keep the 
L. A. W. alive if only you and I have to do it." 



Kirk Munroe, our prime founder, is drinking in 
fresh air and writing stories at Cocoanut Grove, 
Florida. He writes a cheering note and says: "I am 
still on deck with five wheels and am living in a com- 
munity of wheelmen." Probably drinks the milk in 
the cocoanut every morning. 



The Veteran Wheelmen's Association of Philadel- 
phia was held at Bingham House, April 6. There 
were 60 present and there was very much fun and 
jollity. President Thomas Hare presided. Ex- 
President Morris was called upon to respond to a 
toast to the L. A. W. 

Two runs were decided upon, the 1 first, May 8, to 
Beideman's Fishhouse, along the Delaware River, 
and the second run is scheduled for Saturday, June 
5, to the Delaware County Country Club. 

All the old officers were re-elected and the follow- 
ing memership committee named: Messrs. Long- 
streth, Neil, Cain, Bilyeu and Lokes. 



The Rover's Cycle Club of Charlestown, Mass., 
held its annual dinner at the Athletic Club, Boston, 
on Saturday, April 17. A very jolly company of 25 
kept things moving. Mr. Vreedenburg entertained 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 37 

the club with some remarkably fine dialect readings. 
Secretary Bassett read some verses, to be found in 
another column, and addresses were made by Presi- 
dent Thomas H. Hall, Edward Burbeck, Henry W. 
Robinson, Arthur W. Robinson, John B. Seward and 
E. H. Norris. 



THE GOOD TIME COMING. 

The verse-maker was given leave to print certain verses 
read at the annual banquet of the Rover's Cycle Club. 
April 17. He is of the opinion that there would not be a 
good time coming to him did he make public the verses 
which were of an intensely personal nature and he thinks 
it best to omit them. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming; 

We may not live to see the day, 

And yet it's not so far away, 

This good time coming. 

We all shall live the perfect life, 

The weaker shall be stronger, 

Fresh air our only medicine, 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming; 

When brown tails shall not eat the trees, 

Nor germs make humans cough and sneeze, 

In the good time coming. 

Against those bugs that make us sick, 

Our battle shall be stronger, 

A walking bughouse — I guess not, — 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming; 

When through the air we all shall fly, 

And ride a cycle to the sky, 

In the good time coming. 



38 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

The birds, we know, are built to fly, 
Than man they are much stronger, 
But we shall yet beat out the birds, 
Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming, 

Then men shall deem the public good 

Forbids a gamble with our food 

In the good time coming. 

Against the man who corners wheat, 

The law shall be made stronger. 

He'll have a corner in the jail, 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming: 

Our sons shall ride the silent steed, 

And get the exercise they need, 

In the good time coming. 

They'll ride the tours we used to ride, 

And find their muscles stronger, 

The cycle's calling them to come, 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming, 

The Marathons will fly the air, 

And give the blooming birds a scare 

In the good time coming. 

We've heard of racetrack fouls on earth, 

Fouls in the air are stronger, 

The Racing Board will catch the fouls, 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming; 

When on the ten-cent counter we 

Shall then a useful auto see, 

In the good time coming. 

They'll be of forty saw-horse power, 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 39 

Perhaps a trifle stronger, 

And not go faster than the law — 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming, 

When baskets shall not serve instead 

Of hats upon a lady's head, 

In the good time coming. 

If 'neath a bushel it is hid 

No beauty can be stronger, 

Yet summer'll bring the hatless girl, 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming, 

It's sure to come just once a year, 

To all good fellows gathered here, 

Who all are up and coming. 

To eat, to drink, to laugh, to sing 

But makes our friendship stronger, 

God bless good people, every one. 

The day has gone, the night is young, 

Let's stay a little longer. 



The Essex Bicycle Club of Newark, N. J., organ- 
ized March, 1879, and the second in line among the 
oldest bicycle clubs in the country, held its thirty- 
first annual meeting April 24. 

Herbert W. Knight acted as toastmaster. Among 
those who spoke were Fred J. Keer, Dr. William P. 
Richards, Madison Ailing, Willis P. Atwater and 
Robert Gentle. After the banquet the club held a 
theatre party at Proctor's. 

At the business meeting, which was held before 
the dinner, officers were re-elected as follows: Presi- 
dent, William A. Righter; vice president, Herbert 
W. Knight; secretary-treasurer, Benjamin J. Coe. 



40 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

The following were selected to serve another year as 
directors: Samuel Williams, George Murdock and 
E. O. Chase. A resolution was adopted favoring the 
enforcement of that provision in the new automobile 
law which requires that lights be displayed on all 
vehicles using the public roads at night. Besides 
those mentioned, the club members present were C. 
Dennison, A. J. Clark, Jr., F. E. Hodge, Dr. Her- 
bert S. Sutphen^ C. R. Zacharias, F. L. C. Martin, 
Theodore F. Merseles and Dr. Albert B. Osmun. 
Old timers will recognize many familiar names in 
the list. 



A. G. Batchelder of New York wants a reunion. 
"It strikes me that some day we ought to have some 
kind of grand reunion, possibly in New York City, 
during one of the two big automobile shows. We 
could probably fill the biggest banquet hall in the 
town and have a real old gathering." All right! 
New York will please make ready. We are going 
to have in Boston in 1920 a "Pilgrim Fathers Ex- 
position." Boston is looking forward to 1915 when 
she hopes to be the most beautiful city in the world, 
— in 1920 she is bound to be. Be ready to make a 
pilgrimage to Boston, but New York may open 
house sooner'. These will be things to live for and 
we hope all the old timers will stay around. 



Are you interested in the published lists of mem- 
bers. These things grow on a man, like his 
whiskers. We are having quite a demand for back 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 41 

numbers from those who have just become inter- 
ested. 



No. 1630. — In the convention to organize the 
L. A. W. at Newport, May 31, 1880, each club was 
allowed two delegates, with each a vote; but if a 
club had but one representative he was allowed two 
votes. States were represented by these club dele- 
gates as follows: Conn., 5; D. C, 1; 111., 1; Mass., 
23; N. J., 1; N. Y., 10; Penn., 6; R. I., 2. The house 
was divided. Club men were on one side and the 
unattached on the other. When it came to voting 
there was great unanimity and all voted alike. 



No. 1399. — The rise and fall of membership totals 
at and around high-water mark is shown by the fol- 
lowing table. 1897, Dec. 31, 102,637. 1898 — Jan. 7, 
103,285; Jan. 14, 103,183; Jan. 21, 103,293; Jan. 28, 
103,148; Feb. 4, 103,039. 



While in Daytona I had a long talk with the agent 
for the Pope Mfg. Co., at that place. He deplored 
the fact that there is not a reliable tricycle to be had 
in the American market. He told me he could have 
sold 40 machines this season had he been able to get 
them, and could have rented even a larger number. 
—Cor. Bi World. 

Tell the tariff tinkers to take off that 45 per cent. 
duty and we can get some of the very good three- 
wheelers that the English makers are putting out. 



42 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

A SPRING CYCLE. 

Ting-a-ling, ting-a-ling, 
'Tis the first song of spring; 
The bicycle bell — 
What a quick, jolly ring! 

It tells of long runs on the road, smooth and hard, 
In the pure country air where no pavements retard; 
Where the swift flying wheels flash back the sun's rays, 
And brighten the path and the long summer days. 

What joy thus to speed 

Far away from the town, 
On this swift, silent steed, 

Like the light thistledown! 

And coast the long hills, over valley and plain, 
From the hum of the mills, up the steep ridge again, 
And gaze on the glories spread out 'neath the eye; 
The gleam of the river, the wood, the blue sky, — 
All nature is smiling, for sweet spring is nigh. 

Then mount, and away on the wings of the wind, 
And countless new pleasures you surely will find; 
Our band is united, come woe or come weal; 
Three cheers, and a tiger; hurrah for the wheel! 



Walking. Chapter Two. — Walking is a perpetual 
falling with a perpetual self-recovery. It is a most 
complex, violent, and perilous operation, which we 
divest of its extreme danger only by continual prac- 
tice from a very early period of life. We find how 
complex it is when we attempt to analyze it, and we 
see that we never understood it thoroughly until the 
time of the instantaneous photograph. We learn 
how violent it is when we walk against a post or a 
door in the dark. We discover how dangerous it is 
when we slip or trip and come down, perhaps break- 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 43 

ing or dislocating our limbs, or overlook the last 
step of a flight of stairs, and discover with what 
headlong violence we have been hurling ourselves 
forward. And yet we walk with confidence nor fear 
a fall. 



If the present agitation for good roads is con- 
tinued by the motorists of many Southern states it 
will only be a question of a year or two before it will 
be possible for automobilists to tour through the 
South on new highways, which will compare favor- 
ably with those in many of the states of the North. 
That is one of the things that wheelmen never ac- 
complished. The South did not respond to the call 
for good roads as the North did. No publisher could 
find material for a good-roads map in the South and 
none was ever published. The big auto can push 
reform along lines that little brother cycle could 
never exploit. 



"Is Mr. Bromley in?" asked the caller. 

"He is not, sorr," Pat answered politely. "Shure, 
he won't be in till four o'clock, or mebbe after." 

"Where's he gone?" 

"He went to ride in his interim, sorr." 

"His what?" 

"His interim. Tis a tony name fer buggy, I'm 
thinking. Half an hour ago Mishter Bromley says 
to me, Tat,' says he, 'I'm ixpictin' Mishter Dobbs 
here some time this afternoon, but I guess he won't 
be after gettin' here yet awhile, so I'll go downtown 



44 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

in the interim.' An' with that he druv off in his 
buggy." — Lippincott's. 



The California asphalt producers, wishing to 
become more prosperous at the expense of their 
fellow citizens, have petitioned Congress to raise 
the present duty on asphalt, crude and refined, to 
$3.36 a ton. The present duty is $1.50 on the crude 
and $3 on the refined. The good roads committee, 
co-operating with state highway commissions, also 
with the national grange and other organizations 
devoted to the improvement of American roads, de- 
clares that if the duty is increased, as contemplated, 
progress in good roads will be delayed for years. 
Therefore, the proposed increase in asphalt duties is 
an attempt to barricade American highways — a 
holdup, as it were, for the benefit of a few Pacific 
coast plutocrats. Another robbery in shape of a 
tariff tax. 



Chaplain Joyce, who has created a sensation 
among the soldiers at Walla Walla by calling for 
legislation making religious instruction compulsory 
among soldiers and fixing some means whereby 
credit for attendance on divine service shall be 
given, and charging that with no regulations to force 
the soldiers to attend divine service, atheism, skep- 
ticism and agnosticism prevail throughout the rank 
and file, evidently thinks that when the band plays 
"Onward, Christian Soldier," the tune ought to fit 
the facts. Wonder if the chaplain will call their 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 45 

attention to that chapter of the decalogue which 
says: "Thou shalt not kill"? 

The trial of the damage suit against Dr. Julian P, 
Thomas over in New York has established the fact 
that if a young woman invites a young man to take 
her to ride in his automobile and then gets hurt in 
a smashup she cannot recover damages from him, 
although if a young man invites a young woman to 
ride with him, and she gets smashed up, he may be 
liable. It isn't a good idea, anyway, for young 
women to invite young men to take them out to 
ride, but then we are ready to take the risk. 



PLEDGES FROM LIFE MEMBERS. 

I agree to pay the sum set against my name yearly on 
the first day of January for five successive years to enable 
the League of American Wheelmen to continue its good 
work and to maintain an official magazine devoted to the 
interests of the organization. This agreement to be void 
in case of my death. 

In response to the circular sent out by the Ways and 
Means Committee we have had up to April 27, the follow- 
ing pledges: 

E. G. Whitney, Dover, N. H $1.00 

E. H. Scheuber, New York 1.00 

W. H. Lord, New York 1.00 

A. G. Fisher, one new member 1.00 

JOINED IN 1887. 
A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1887 and are still in good standing. 

426 — Mrs. Abbot Bassett, Newtonville, Mass., Jan. 21. 

428— B. Nafis, Woodside, New York, Feb. 11. 

420— P. S. Collins, Philadelphia, Feb. 11. 

430— A. C. Van Gilder, Point Pleasant, W. Va., Feb. 11. 



46 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

432— W. L. Verhoeff, Louisville, Ky., Feb. 18. 

434— Estus E. Eames, Salem, Mass., March 4. 

435 — J- Emory Tippett, Boston, Mass., March 11. 

436 — E. B. Hutchinson, Cambridge, Mass., March 11. 

44i — Theo F. Merseles, Jersey City, N. J., April 29. 

443 — Dr. Wm. D. Kempton, "Cincinnati, O., April 29. 

444— Chas. F. Bane, Nelson, Ga., May 13. 

446— George S. Hill, Bridgeport, Conn., May 27. 

449 — H. R. Nightingale, Providence, R. I., June 3. 

452 — John B. Roberts, Harrisburg, Pa., June 17. 

455— Marion X. Chase, Peoria, 111., July 8. 

450— J. F. Dings, Ottumwa, la., July 8. 

457— Harry Kahler, Camden, N. J., July 8. 

458 — George L. Cooke, Providence, R. I., July 15. 

459 — Mrs. J. Fred Adams, Haverhill, Mass., July 22. 

460 — H. Otto Barth, Cincinnati, O., July 22. 

461 — James A. Scott, Narberth, Pa., July 29. 

462 — John S. Bagby, Rushville, 111., Aug. 5. 

464 — Joseph J. Bliss A Alameda, Cal., Aug. 12. 

465 — F. M. Spinning, Seattle, Wash., Aug. 26. 

466 — Henry Clay Remick, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 16. 

468 — John E. Domschke, New York City, Oct. 7. 

469— R. P. Stout, Bethlehem, Pa., Oct. 14. 

470 — J. W. Packard, Warren, O., Oct. 21. 



J. F. McGowan writes from Fergus Falls, Minn.: "Dear 
Sir: Enclosed please find $1.00 in paper to cover my re- 
newal for this year. While I seldom ride a wheel now, I 
like to keep in touch with those who do and for the sake 
of Auld Lang Syne I want to keep the L. A. W. alive. I 
shall never forget the meeting in Niagara along in the 
nineties and yet expect to have a tour awheel in and 
around Boston. Our state is awakening to the value and 
our county will expend $20,000 the coming summer for 
Good Roads, HUrrah. Yours fraternally, J. F. McGowan." 



Mr. Alvey A. Adee, Assistant Secretary of State, is off 
on his annual bicycle tour. He writes under date April 2: 
"Dear Secretary: I am glad to have you remind me that 
my subscription to the L. A. W. is about due. All of my 
arrangements are very much delayed this year, but I have 
pleasure now in enclosing one dollar for the renewal of my 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 47 

subscription, and on the blank I have called attention to 
my wish that you send me also the English C. T. C. card. 
I expect to sail for France for my annual bicycle excursion 
on the 15th instant by 'La Provence.' With kind remem- 
brances, very truly yours, Alvey A. Adee." 



A WORD OF APPRECIATION. 

My Dear Editor: I enclose my renewal without asking 
the question that I used to have to answer so often that 
throat sometimes refused to perform its usual function. 
The question which I allude to was: 

"What do I get for my dollar?" Those of us who are 
left are not apt to ask such questions. We are not quite 
so mercenary. It is fully worth the dollar to be able to 
perpetuate an organization of those who "fit and bled" for 
wheelmen's rights. Rich with pleasant recollections is the 
name of the "L. A. W." The bitterness of some of our 
internecine strivings is forgotten and only the pleasant 
remains. 

Of course when we call the roll of those who stood with 
us in our local and state contests and find so many of them 
have gone to their last home, it does make one a little sad 
and lonesome. 

Then again when we see others reaping what we sowed, 
i. e., enjoying the "Good Roads" we fought so hard for 
and not even thanking us for our pains, we may be in- 
clined to resent the ingratitude of the public and wish for 
a moment that they might have to go back to the roads 
as we found them so that they would actually know what 
they owe to the efforts of the . sometimes humble wheel- 
man. 

Still of all "The pictures that hang on memory's walls" 
there are perhaps none that possess for me more interest 
than those concerning cycling. The friends made then 
were tried and true. We knew each other better than we 
ever could in any other way. 

Hoping that the old organization may continue, I beg to 
remain as ever, 

Fraternally yours, 

William D. Kempton. 

Cincinnati, April 3, 1008. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 







BHGULAR IMPKOVBD 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columhia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTEE FOR 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter nionths we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-$l 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second-Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ' 1>U!51 ' 011 

Vol. 7. No. 4 JUNE, 1909 5 Cents 



"Beautiful June! Sunshiny June! 
The earth and the air are in perfect attune, 
Singing to welcome thee, beautiful June. 

"Now good-by to the books, for our teachers shall be 
Just the hills and the trees and the glorious sea, 
In the sunshine of June who so happy as we?" 



MONTH OF THE LONGEST DAYS. 
From our twenty-ninth birthday we stepped over 
into June. 



May 31, 1880. Thirtieth anniversary next year. 
What a lot of things we've taken in during the pass- 
age. 



Count that day lost whose low descending sun 
finds at thy hands no early morning run. 



Greetings from President Taft to the Good Roads 
Convention at Baltimore, May 18. He's all right! 

It is not always safe to gauge prosperity by the 
number of men one sees riding bicycles. 



50 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

An East St. Louis judge has ruled that the 
evening meal is supper and not dinner. Without 
going into the merits of his decision, we'll have to 
admit that we admire the judge's bravery. We 
never did like having dinner for supper. 



"In twenty years from now we will all be flying," 
says a scientist. But we shan't be able to walk on 
the ceiling. 



Prohibition may not prohibit, but it is quite an 
inconvenience to the man who wants a drink. 



"A metaphysical physician now tells mothers not 
to punish their children for naughtiness, but to play 
to them on the piano by way of correcting their 
faults." Poor little kids! 



The man who loafs on the corner and insists that 
he has nothing left to live for, usually gets home in 
time for his meals. 



Don't send letters by express. The U. S. govern- 
ment has a monopoly of the business and you must 
patronize it'. The Pope Mfg. Co. has been sending 
its missives from headquarters to factory by express 
and Uncle Sam has vigorously sat down upon the 
practice. The Government is a trust that we can- 
not disturb. It can hit the outside trusts, but the 
outside trust cannot hit back. 



When you discuss the proposition of a dustless 
road surface you naturally think you are only debat- 
ing the comfort of the drivers of automobiles and 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 51 

horses, but you really are considering a home prob- 
lem. Every successful effort, therefore, to get rid of 
road dust in the spring and summer aids in main- 
taining a contented household. 



NOT THAT,— BUT. 
It is not this riding on cycles 

That tires a man almost to death, 
But it's bringing up coal from the cellar 

That fritters away his last breath. 

It is not this riding for record, 

On the quarter-mile bicycle track; 

But it's beating a dusty old carpet, 
That throws a man flat on his back. 

It is not all this hill-climbing labor, 
That will knock a man all of a heap; 

But it's chopping up wood in the morning, 
That will give him a grave long and deep. 

It's not the long night at a "Smoker," 
That makes many give up the strife; 

But it's walking the floor with a baby 
That makes a man tired of life. 



The spring fashions decree that men who aim to 
be correctly dressed shall make their clothing bear 
some relation to their complexions.- Thus, a black- 
haired man will wear a black suit; a gray-haired man 
a gray suit; a red-headed man a red suit; a bald- 
headed man — well, he wouldn't be well dressed even 
if he followed the fashion. 



"American men do not make love enough," says 
Elinor Glyn. She ought to see them on a moonlight 
picnic. 



52 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 



Find the Man. — Harper's Weekly publishes the 
record of a journey afoot around the world. Harry 
A. Franck, the author, relates this experience at the 
village inn of La Charite, France. 

The village inn was distinguished from the pri- 
vate dwellings by a mere bundle of dried fagots 
above the door. I entered, to find myself in a room 
well stocked with wooden tables, with here and 
there a trio of villagers over their wine and cards, 
blowing clouds of smoke at the unhewn beams of 
the ceiling. In answer to the customary signal — the 
tapping of pipes on the tables — an elderly woman 
appeared and inquired in the cold, brusque voice of 
formality wherein she could serve me. 

''You have lodgings, n'est-ce pas?" 

A sudden startling silence greeted the first sug- 
gestion of a foreign accent. Cards paused in mid- 
air, pipes ceased to draw, tipplers craned their necks 
to listen, and madame surveyed me deliberately, 
even a bit disdainfully, from crown to toe. Evi- 
dently satisfied with her inspection, she subdued her 
scowl, admitted that she had been known to lodge 
travelers before, and hurried off to bring the reg- 
ister, while the smoking and the drinking and card- 
playing were slowly and healf-heartedly resumed. 

Madame scrutinized intently each stroke of the 
coarse pen as I filled in the various blanks, puzzled 
several moments over my "passport," and dropped 
all her brusqueness with the stiff dignity that had 
hidden her natural loquacity. 

"What! You are an American? Why, another 



BASSE-IT'S SCRAP BOOK 53 

American has lodged here. It was in 1882. He was 
making the tour of the world on a bicycle. He came 
from Boston" — she pronounced it with a distressing 
nasal — "but I could not understand his French. He 
did! not pronounce the r. He said 'fonce' when he 
meant 'francais.' Instead of 'terre/ he said 'teah.' 
I will give you his bed. He had not many hairs on 
his head. Do you eat ragout also in America? He 
wore such funny pince-nez. You'll find that fine 
wine. He had hurt his foot — " And thus she chat- 
tered on, through my supper and up the stairs to my 
sleeping quarters. 

The room once graced by the man from Boston 
was stone-floored with whitewashed walls, and large 
enough to have housed a squad of infantry. Of the 
two beds it contained — carefully curtained off and 
scrupulously clean — I should have preferred the one 
nearer the window. Unfortunately, my compatriot 
of the pince-nez had chosen the other, and madame 
would not hear of my violating the precedent thus 
established. 

If the bicycle man had given his address as New 
York we should have said I. B. Potter. We had an 
idea that Thomas Stevens was the first wheelman to 
go around the world, but he did not leave New York 
till September, 1885. Find the man. 



It is not often that a proffered order for seventy 
high grade bicycles is permitted to go begging, but 
this proved the case with the order for that number 
of bicycles which are desired by the New York 
Police Department. Although the Department ad- 



54 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

vertised for bids, there were no bids to be opened, 
for the good all-sufficient reason that none had been 
received. 



C. M. Fairchild of Chicago has always been a hard 
and faithful worker for the League. He has started 
a crusade in Chicago to pull back into the League 
some of those who were prominent in League affairs 
several years ago. We had good times then; why 
not now? Men can't play alone, nor work to ad- 
vantage alone. A solitary wheelman is not bad, but 
four of a kind is better. 



Congratulations to our Ex-President. In spite of 
opposition from a number of ultra-conservative 
members of the Michigan House of Representatives, 
Highway Commissioner Horatio S. Earle has se- 
cured the passage by that body of his famous high- 
way bill increasing the appropriation for good roads 
in Michigan to $300,000 for the ensuing two years. 
Commissioner Earle has for many years been a most 
consistent advocate of good roads in Michigan and 
the present victory is almost entirely due to his 
work a'nd faith in his doctrine. 



Another boy cyclist killed in Boston by being run 
over by an automobile. This kind of thing is be- 
coming altogether too common. 

Walking. Chapter Three. — Two curious facts are 
easily proved. First, a man is shorter when he is 
walking than when at rest. We have found a very 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 55 

simple way of showing this by having a rod or yard- 
stick placed horizontally, so as to touch the top of 
the head forcibly, as we stand under it. In walking 
rapidly beneath it, even if the eyes are shut, to avoid 
involuntary stooping, the top of the' head will not 
even graze the rod. The other fact is, that one side 
of a man always tends to outwalk the other, so that 
no person can walk far in a straight line, if he is 
blindfolded. 



The National Museum at Munich has two speci- 
mens of the Draisienne, the very oldest type of 
bicycle. Baron von Drais de Saverbrun was a fa- 
mous rider in. his time, and not only used the ma- 
chines on his extensive journeys as Master of the 
Woods and Forests, but for the use of his employes 
and messengers of the Royal Court of Bavaria in 
the suburbs of Nymghenburg about 1820 to 1830. 
To this period belonged the two machines which 
were added by the (local) Royal Antiquarian So- 
ciety, in 1888. One of these machines has cranks 
and pedals which the old machine of the Baron had 
not, for it was propelled by an impetus given from 
the feet upon the ground. It has been found that 
the cranks and pedals were added to the old machine 
by a hitherto unheard of celebrity, Karl Kech, in a 
freak of inventive foresight, about 1862 — certainly 
not earlier. This — 1862 — is, however, early enough 
to dispose of Pierre Lallement, of Paris, as the in- 
ventor of the bicycle, for he did not come on the 
scene for about three years afterwards. So, if every 
one had their rights, Karl Kech ought to be hailed 



56 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

as the true inventor of the bicycle. It was, how- 
ever," merely a flash of genius; perhaps the machine 
was never ridden — certainly, there is no evidence of 
any other ever having been made. 



E. W. B. of Philadelphia has come back to his 
first love and brought his son along. It is a good 
thing for a son to ride in the wheel tracks of his 
Dad: "It gives me great pleasure to hand you here- 
with my check for $i, the usual annual contribu- 
tion to the welfare of the League. It is gratifying 
to note from your monthly magazine the activity 
displayed and the interest taken in the old organiza- 
tion by the original members. May prosperity con- 
tinue and the membership gradually grow up to the 
figures of about ten or twelve years ago. A few 
years ago I sidetracked temporarily the bicycle for 
the horse, but am again taking up riding with my 
young son, who is an enthusiast on the wheel. A 
little later on I hope to send in his application as a 
member of the League." 



T. R. C. of Philadelphia hopes for a resumption 
of wheeling in Quakerdom: "On account of the 
advance in car fares it looks as if there would be an 
impetus in the bicycle interest in Philadelphia. The 
people are aroused here and wheels are going 
through the streets bearing a sign, 'Buy a wheel 
and save carfare.' I have been a constant and faith- 
ful rider for eighteen years and love the wheel as 
much today as ever. If the general public knew of 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 57 

its beneficent effects more of them would ride a 
wheel." 



J. A. King wants us all to get together: "I notice 
in the May issue of your Scrap Book you mention 
that Mr. A. G. Bachelder of New York wants a 're- 
union.' The writer, who joined the L. A. W. many 
years ago and who expects to stand by the organi- 
zation, is also heartily in favor of a reunion in the 
city of New York. I think it would be an awful 
good thing to meet the old time people again." 



J. H. D. is still happy and with us: "Count on me 
to stay with the League as long as it shall last. 
What care I if others have stopped riding? I find 
no less pleasure on the wheel than when the road 
was crowded with wheels. I get my lungs full of 
fresh air just the same; harden my muscles just the 
same; drink in the delights of the open just the 
same and have as much real enjoyment as ever. It 
seems to me I shall not care to go to Heaven if I 
cannot be sure of a wheel over there and I do not 
doubt my League ticket will be recognized in the 
Celestial City. What care I if the lazy fellows have 
left? I am here to stay and I shall not dismount for 
many years yet." 



Good old Fred Graves of Rochester, who sells 
elevators, is still interested, if not now elevated to 
the saddle. He sends us his renewal with a mes- 
sage. "Like a few other old chestnuts of the early 



68 BASS.ETTS SCRAP BOOK 

days of bicycling I still wish to hold membership in 
the League." 



A pleasant word from B. T. C. of Kentucky: "En- 
closed find my renewal, which I take pleasure in 
sending. There is nothing quite so dear to me as 
the wheel and the memories of wheel days. I hope 
the League will be kept up. You certainly deserve 
credit for your part in the work. Enjoy the 'Scrap 
Book' very much." 



C. H. G. writes from New York City: "Friend 
and Brother — I take unusual pleasure in sending 
you the enclosed dues and subscription for the year 
beginning on the 1st prox. and congratulate you 
on having restored your Scrap Book to its proper 
function — that of a wheelmen's organ, instead of 
being a little of everything in general and nothing 
in particular. Let us all stick to our colors and 
pray for the renaissance of bicycling — and pay as 
well as pray. I must also thank you for your cour- 
teous letter of almost a year ago in reply to my 
gentle kick on the unrepresentative character of the 
little magazine." 

For convenience in comparing speeds made on 
land by various vehicles, as well as by horses and 
men, the following table of mile records has been 
prepared: 

Electric locomotive, 27 seconds, 1903. 

Automobile, 28 1/2 seconds, 1906. 

Steam locomotive, 32 seconds, 1893. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 59 

Motorcycle, unpaced, I minute, 49 2/5 seconds, 
1904. 

Running horse, 1 minute, 35 1/2 seconds, 1890. 

Pacing horse, 1 minute, 55 seconds, 1906. 

Trotting horse, 1 minute, 58 1/2 seconds, 1905. 

Man skating, 2 minutes, 36 seconds, 1896. 

Man running, 4 minutes, 12 3/4 seconds, 1887. 

Man walking, 6 minutes, 23 seconds, 1890. 

It will be observed that the difference between the 
locomotive and the automobile is trifling. For one 
hundred miles the record of the steam locomotive 
is much better than that of the auto. However, 
both the electric locomotive and the auto may be 
expected to show further improvement, as their de- 
velopment is incomplete, while their steam brother 
has attained about the limit, 



An English inventor has brought out a "Cyclo- 
plane." He thus describes it: "The device consists 
of a canvas plane divided into three compartments 
longitudinally: reception chamber, compressing 
room, and delivery exit. These are internal feat- 
ures. Externally it veers like a windvane, but with 
restrictions; it oscillates over the joint, again with 
restrictions; and it can be set at any desired inclina- 
tion when commencing a journey. It is not neces- 
sary to alter the inclination while traveling, but it is 
an advantage to alter for rear winds. With the wind 
astern cycling is more like dry-land sailing. 

" 'Cycloplane' is the name I have bestowed upon 
my aeroplane-bicycle, one idea of which is to lift' 
part of the weight off the tyres, and make cycling 



60 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

easier thereby. It would be difficult to say precisely 
how much weight is 'lifted/ as this depends upon 
many things. (Traveling down a hill on the lee 
slope of the valley in a gale of wind, I have been 
actually 'lifted' off the road into the air.) It depends 
upon the size of the cycloplane, its inclination, and 
traveling speed and the wind velocity, qualified by 
its direction. The difference in speed with the same 
exertion may be anything from two to ten miles, ac- 
cording to these circumstances. During 600 miles 
of testing in all weathers I have had no accident, nor 
been blown over, even on the occasion when I was 
completely lifted,' which was quite a pleasant ex- 
perience." 



"Didn't I tell ye to feed that cat a pound of meat 
every day until ye had her fat?" demanded an Irish 
shopkeeper, nodding toward a sickly, emaciated cat 
that was slinking through the store, says Every- 
body's. 

"Ye did thot," replied his assistant, "an' I've just 
been after feedin' her a pound of meat this very 
minute." 

"Faith an' I don't believe ye. Bring me the 
scales." 

The poor cat was lifted into the scales. They bal- 
anced at exactly one pound. 

"There!" exclaimed the assistant triumphantly. 
"Didn't I* tell ye she'd had her pound of meat?" 

"That's right?" admitted the boss, scratching his 
head. "That's yer pound of meat all right. But" — 
suddenly looking up — "where the divvil is the cat?" 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 61 

JOINED IN 1888. 

A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1888 and are still in good standing. 

473 — Edward W. Bair, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 20. 

477 — George M. Halsey, New York City, Feb. 17. 

480 — Capt. G. P. Spofford, Campello, Mass., Feb. 24. 

482 — Con Leenhouts, Milwaukee, Wis., March 2. 

483 — Quiney Kilby, Boston, Mass., March 9. 

484 — A. G. Batchelder, Summit, N. J., March 9. & 

486 — J. M. Andreini, New York City, March 16. 

489 — A. W. Kingsbury, Yonkers, N. Y., April 13. 

490 — T. F. Myler, Pittsburg, Pa., April 13. 

491 — Chas. A. Foster, Washington, R. I., April 13. 

492 — George A. Foster, Washington, R. L, April 13. 

493 — Thomas A. Raisbeck, New York City, April 20. 

494 — Milton I. Deane, Fall River, Mass., April 20. 

495 — H. B. Ingraham, Oxford, Mass., April 27. 

497 — E. H. Norris, Cambridge, Mass., April 2.7. 

499 — Elias Davis, Camden, N. J., May 11. 

501 — George L. Cade, Melrose, Mass., May 11. 

502 — Albert M. Beers, Newton Highlands, Mass., May 11. 

503— Hugh Miller, Attica, N. Y., May 18. 

504 — Fred Atwater, Bridgeport, Conn., May 18. 

505— E. P. Hubbell, Toledo, Ohio. June 1. 

506 — W. M. Macomber, Boston, Mass., June 1. 

509 — Spencer G. Ayres, Orange, N. J., June 8. 

510 — Irving Woods, Jacksonville, 111., June 15. 

511 — A. G. Armington, Melrose, Mass., June 15. 

512 — E. J. Burgess, Baltimore, Md., June 22. 

513 — Herman Herzog, Philadelphia, Pa., June 22. 

514 — Allen W. Swan, New Bedford, Mass., July 6. 

515 — Frederick Law Olmsted, Brookline, Mass., July 13. 

516 — W. H. Reeser, Urbana, Ohio, July 20. 

518 — Dr. T. J. Lee, Brighton, Mass., July 20. 

520 — Jacob A. King, New York City, July 27. 

521 — Rev. W. C. Roberts, Corning, N. Y., Aug. 3. 

522 — D. L. Watson, Jr., Detroit, Mich., Aug. 10. 

523 — H. E. Deats, Flemington, N. J., Aug. 10. 

525 — Andrew C. Berry. Boston, Mass., Aug. 31. 

527 — R. B. Twining, Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 31. 



62 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

528— Wm. A. Haines, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 7. 
530 — H. J. Munroe, Somerville, Mass., Sept. 21. 
532— Henry F. Pollman, Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 5. 
533 — H. C. Drenning, Baltimore, Md., Oct. 12. 
534 — George L. Estey, Worcester, Mass., Oct. 12. 
535 — E. A. Simonds, Somerville, Mass., Oct. 12. 
536— Frank W. Burbank, Nashua, N. H., Oct. 12. 
537— W. H. Field, Green Bay, Wis., Nov. 2. 
539 — John Dolph, Baltimore, Md., Nov. 9. 
540 — Ghas. E. Markham, Buffalo, N. Y., Nov. 16. 
542 — I. F. McGowan, Fergus Falls, Minn., Nov. 30. 

The next publication will exhaust the list of those who 
are Pioneers of the L. A. W., having joined during the first 
decade of its existence. 

No. 455, published in May issue, is Marion X. Chuse, not 
"Chase," as printed. 



JOSEPH G. DALTON. 

There died May 27 last past a very familiar figure in 
wheeling circles. Mr. Dalton obtained from Timms & 
Lawford one of the bicycles sent over to the Centennial 
Exposition at Philadelphia in 1876. Up to that time he 
had been a rider of the old velocipede. Equipped with the 
new Paragon bicycle he rode 1,000 miles in 1877 and from 
that time until a few years since he rode the wheel per- 
sistently. Alfred D. Chandler and B. P. Browne rode the 
bicycle in Boston before Dalton attempted it, but there is 
no question of his right to third place. 

He was the earliest poet of cycling, his verse taking the 
form of parodies on Swinburne, Holmes, Longfellow and 
other well-known poets. He did some very good work in 
this direction. He published an edition of his collected 
verse in a volume entitled "Lyra Bicyclica." A member of 
the Boston. Bicycle Club for many years he was well known 
to local wheelmen and universally respected. He was 8f 
years of age at the time of his death. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 63 

LIFE. 
Life is a burden to everyone's shoulder — 

None may escape from its trouble and care; 
Miss it in youth and 't will come when we're older, 

And fit us as close as the garments we wear. 

Sorrow comes into our home uninvited, 
Robbing our hearts of the treasures of song; 

Lovers grow cold, and our friendships are slighted, 
Yet somehow or other we worry along. 

'Midst the sweet blossoms that smile on our faces 
Grow the rank weeds that would poison and blight; 

And e'en in the midst of earth's beautiful places 
There's always a something that isn't just right. 

Yet oft from the rock we may pick a gay flower, 
And drink from a spring in a desolate waste; 

They come to the heart as a heavenly dower 
And naught is so sweet to the eye or the taste. 

Everyday toil is an everyday blessing, 
Though poverty's cottage and crust we may share; 

Weak is the back on which burdens are pressing, 
But stout is the heart which is strengthened by prayer. 

Somehow or other the pathway grows brighter, 
Just when we mourned there was none to befriend; 

Hope in the heart makes the burden seem lighter, 
And somehow or other we get to the end. 

-(?) 

Of the many quaint limericks extant the following is 
probably the gem. Before reading, it would be judicious 
to notice that Sawbridgeworth is pronounced by the natives 
"Sapsed": 

There was a young person of Sawbridgeworth, 
Who threw a flat iron at chawbridge worth; 

For this little freak 

She confronted the beak, 
And got "jugged" till three month has elawbridgeworth. 

— Liverpool Post. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 




HlK 



BBGTTLAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



BaSSett'S Scrap Bool< 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#l. 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, SI, 00 an inch! 

Entered as Second-Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 5 JULY, 1909 5 Cents 



CRACKERS AND SQUIBS. 



Poor roads are good grounds for repairing them. 



The Wright brothers are men of the highest aspi- 
rations. 



Is it right to call it a single wheel when the rider 
is wedded to it? 



We had a pleasant call last month from Charles 
K. Alley all the way from Pasadena, Cal. He was 
at one time Secretary of the L. A. W. and he comes 
East once in so often to wheel around the Hub. 



Herbert W. Knight, the old-time official stenog- 
rapher of the League, was in Boston last month. 
We had a pleasant chat with him. 



Dr. Louis C. Le Roy of New York City sailed for 
a rest abroad in Switzerland last month. 



Milo M. Belding, Jr., has been through a serious 
illness. At last accounts he was much better and 



66 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

drinking in health down among the sea breezes at 
Atlantic City. 



Crackers and cheese go well together except on 
the Fourth of July. Perhaps the cheese is afraid the 
crackers will rocket. 



The Newton Bicycle Club is having, this month, 
its annual run to the hills of New Hampshire, where 
under the shade of ihe old apple tree at Amherst 
will be held the quarterly meeting and the annual 
bath in Lake Baboosic. The club claims the record 
for the longest time going to meeting. With a 
President named Beers they hope to do honor to the 
host who is Fuller. 



C. P. Buchanan, one of the pioneer members, 
located at Pittsburg, Pa., has been transferred to 
the Watertown (Mass) Arsenal. He will now dis- 
cover what a really good road is. 



We hear from all around that the bicycle is com- 
ing back. It doesn't have to. It has never left us. 
What we want is to hear of -the tourist and the clubs 
coming back. ' 



It is alwavs pour weather when it rains hard. 



"The Philadelphia Press" has won the first round 
in its fight to abolish toll roads and toll gates in 
Pennsylvania. A legislative commission has been ap- 
pointed to investigate the whole subject and report 
to the next Legislature on the best means of getting 
rid of what "The Press" calls a nuisance and a 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 67 

check on the commercial progress of the state. 
Don't you remember the fights we had over these 
same toll roads? The wheelmen used to evade the 
fare charged those who were riding by carrying 
their wheels on their shoulders past the toll gates. 
It is a good thing they are gone. 



Walking. Chapter Four. — Selected from Joe 
Cone. — "I haven't got a limousine, or ary aeroplane. 
I haven't got a coach an' six, not e'en a special train. 
I haven't got a bicycle, nor yet a hoss an' team. I 
git along all right, by jinks, 'thout gaserline or 
steam. I travel jest by shank's mare an' never hev 
no fear but what I'll reach my stoppin' place the 
same day in the year; no artificial rigs fur me, no 
busted tires or bones; no landin' all up in a heap 
upon the highway stones. I may be slow a-gittin' 
round, an' cause the world to stare, but I will git 
there by an' by, all right side up with care." 



The other day at the meeting of the presbytery of 
Hamilton, attention was called to the fact that a 
"church member and communicant" had desecrated 
the Sabbath by motoring several miles to church, 
although he had places of worship close at hand. 
The offender made his peace by explaining that he 
had motored on the Sunday "for the good of the 
church and to the glory of God." Twenty years ago 
such an irregularity would have been censured and 
the culprit would very likely have been excommuni- 
cated for a season of repentance and reformation. — 
London Truth. 



68 BASSE-IT'S SCRAP BOOK 

TO A PERFECT WIFE. 
When touring on your mount you sit, 
I love to watch you, keen and fit; 
My pleasure 'tis for your sweet sake 
To mend your tires, adjust your brake. 

And when we seek a wider range, 
And take our tandem for a change, 

what a rapture 'tis to see 
Your dainty form in front of me! 

A motor-cycle, too, I keep 

To spare you toil when roads are steep; 

B«e ere I wrestle with the wind 

1 fix your trailer firm behind. 

On double-tricycle we ride, 
And lover-like chat side by side. 
You gently aid my task the while 
And pay part-passage with a smile. 

And when each day has near'd its end 
Who can like you my whisky blend? 
So deftly kindle my cigar 
Or pass me the tobacco-jar? 

Blest mate! who thus your powers employ 

To lessen worry, add to joy; 

When you no more can safely roam 

I'll sell our stock and bide at home! 

— F. B. S. in C. T. C. Gazette. 



Fruitarian diet is to be vigorously advocated this 
summer by the Order of the Golden Age of Eng- 
land, which has opened an international headquar- 
ters in London. The following are given as advan- 
tages of a fruitarian diet: Man's physical structure 
demonstrates that he is a fruit-eating creature; flesh 
food is very frequently diseased, and so causes many 
distressing maladies; fruitarian food is superior in 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 69 

nutritive value to the flesh of animals. If man 
adopted a fruitarian diet, said Dr. Robert Bell at the 
headquarters, there was no reason why he should 
not attain the age of 128. Be a fruitarian by all 
means. 



The idea of starting the working day two hours 
earlier will never become popular. A majority of 
people will continue to favor the old-fashioned habit 
of turning over and going to sleep again. By the 
way, — will they set the clock back or forward? This 
is what the world is debating just now. 



A motor manufacturing concern of Vienna has of- 
fered a prize of $200 for a device by which the speed 
of an automobile may be kept to fifteen miles an 
hour. 



Dalton, Ducker, Myler! Three prominent ones 
gone. We are all waiting our turn. 

Did you know that cycling was a potent worker 
in the cause of temperance? The old-time bicycle 
served to take mankind into the open, away from 
tempting saloons, says a correspondent, and it was 
first to let down the bars into pastures new. There- 
fore despise not the humble wheel, the predecessor 
of the masterful automobile, for it knocked out the 
dull city living, with its cramped, unaesthetic asso- 
ciations and freed the understanding for better 
things. The chauffeur and the motor reign where 
once the cyclist spun along into the country fresh- 
ness and enjoying all the privileges of the highway. 



70 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Cyclists speed in motor cars, or take the trolleys 
nowadays, and tomorrow they will be looking down 
on us from their airships! — Boston Herald. 



Although he was mild in his speech and manner 
the old gentleman played golf well. But once when 
he made a foozle he ejaculated vehemently the word 
"Assouan!" A few moments later, when he had 
made another bad play, he repeated: "Assouan!" 
The fourth time one of his friends said: "I certainly 
do not want to be inquisitive, but will you tell me 
why you say 'Assouan' so often?" "Well," said the 
old gentleman, "isn't that the biggest dam in the 
world?" He was a clergyman. 



Under a new law which went into effect on May 
1st, all business establishments in Australia are re- 
quired to close at noon on Saturdays, cycle stores 
and a few others being excepted. 



In the early days of cycling nearly the whole royal 
family of England took to the tricycle. Now comes 
word across the Atlantic that King Edward VII is 
riding the three-wheeler as a health exercise. As 
goes Edward so goes the social world. 

A scientist says only quiet women are beautiful. 
We have no comment to offer. We're simply print- 
ing this for any possible good it may do. 

Prof. Darwin, the English astronomer, who has 
shown that the length of days on the earth was once 
only three hours, and that they have been gradually 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 71 

lengthened by tidal friction, predicts that eventually 
the length of the day will be just the same as the 
length of the year. Only think how pleasant it will 
seem to draw your wages at least fifty times a day! 
And think how many centuries you can ride in a 
day. 



The definition of success enunciated by Mrs. A. 
J. Stanley of Lincoln, Kan., is well worth the $250 
paid for it by a Boston publisher. It runs thus and 
is a good thing to paste up somewhere in sight: 
"He has achieved success who has lived well, 
laughed often and loved much; who has gained the 
respect of intelligent men and the love of little chil- 
dren; who has filled his niche and accomplished his 
task; who has left the world better than he found it, 
whether by an improved poppy, a perfect poem or a 
rescued soul; who has never lacked appreciation of 
earth's beauty or failed to express it; who has al- 
ways looked for the best in others and given the 
best he had; whose life was an inspiration, whose 
memory a benediction." 



PLEDGES FROM MEMBERS. 

I agree to pay the sum set against my name yearly on 
the first day of January for five successive years to enable 
the League of American Wheelmen to continue its good 
work and to maintain an official magazine devoted to the 
interests of the organization. This agreement to be void 
in case of my death. 

In response to the circular sent out by the Ways and 
Means Committee we have had up to June 28, the follow- 
ing pledges: 

Chas. K. Alley, Pasadena, Cal $4.00 

Dr. Louis C. Le Roy, N. Y. City 5.00 



72 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

MR. TREVOR F. MYLER. 

Mr. Trevor F. Myler, one of the best known men in 
cycling circles of Pennsylvania, and well known to old time 
League members, received injuries on Memorial Day 
which led to his death the following day. Our correspond- 
ent at Pittsburg sends us the particulars. 

Myler had been riding motors for about a year, but had 
never bought one. Was on a rented machine and going 
at forty miles an hour or like forty (I am not sure which 
expression he was reported to have used), with a car com- 
ing after him at a faster gait. He turned into a cross 
street and seeing that the car was going to take the same 
course (turn to the left), he rode wide to give the driver 
a chance to pass to his left. This fellow was evidently not 
a League man and so ignorant concerning the laws of the 
road and concluded Myler was going wide to make the 
turn and that he would swing over to the left, which of 
course he had no thought of doing. Myler went as close 
to the curb as he could, but the car hit him and he went 
under. The driver was new at the business and after run- 
ning clear over him got his car in back motion and backed 
clear over the helpless fellow. It occurred about 5 o'clock 
Monday afternoon the 31st of May and Myler died the next 
evening about 8. He was conscious until shortly before he 
passed away and suffered dreadfully. The ribs were torn 
from the spinal column with consequent laceration of the 
main nerve centres. 

Mr. Myler was deeply interested in amateur sports, par- 
ticularly in bicycling from the inception of the sport in its 
latter day form, and was one of the founders of the Key- 
stone Bicycle Club. He joined the L. A. W. in April, 1888, 
and was one of those whom Pennsylvania always sent to 
represent her at the national gatherings. He served as 
Official timer at nearly all the amateur athletic contests in 
western Pennsylvania, and this was a work in which he 
took special pride. He was the Pittsburg supervisor of the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society, and for years had occu- 
pied a position with that corporation. In private life Mr. 
Myler was a man of many friends — friends who admired 
him for his good qualities of head and heart — a man to 
whom many people own a tribute of gratitude and affection. 
His memory is fragrant with kindnesses which his friends 
will never cease to remember. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 73 

HENRY E. DUCKER. 

Died June 13, 1909, at Lake George, N. Y., Henry E. 
Ducker, aged 61. For many years one of the most con- 
spicuous figures in the cycling world. He did things in a 
large way, he drew about him men who drank in some of 
his own enthusiasm and proved able lieutenants in his work. 

Mr. Ducker was born in London, England, June 27, 
1848, and when five years old came to this country with 
his parents and received his education in Brooklyn. He 
then learned the printer's and bookbinder's trade in Spring- 
field, Mass., and in 1887 went to Buffalo to become super- 
intendent of the art printing department of the Matthews- 
Northrup Company, in which position he remained for ten 
years. In 1899 he was appointed examiner of printing bills 
by the State Comptroller, which necessitated his removal 
to the capital at Albany, N. Y.; he held that office at the 
time of his death. 

Mr. Ducker first came into prominence when in October, 

1882, he brought Hendee down from Springfield to Boston 
and wrested the national L. A. W. 1 mile championship 
from Lewis T. Frye, the Boston favorite. This was Oct. 
20, 1882, and the race was held at Beacon Park as a part of 
the program incident to the Fall Meeting of the Board of 
Officers L. A. W. A tournament had been held at Spring- 
field the previous September, but this had not attracted 
anything more than ordinary attention. Hendee's victory 
put him in the lime light and the following September, 

1883, occurred the first of that series of world-famed Spring- 
field * tournaments. Twenty-three thousand people were 
gathered in Hampden Park. Ducker was a skilful adver- 
tiser. He started a paper of his own, "The Wheelmen's 
Gazette," which gained a large circulation. At Buffalo, 
and at Boston, Ducker promoted tournaments, but he 
never repeated the successes of Springfield. His attempt 
to create a middle class of riders between the amateur and 
professional was the cause of his decadence. Ducker was 
a big-hearted, whole-souled man; universally respected and 
loved. Those who disagreed with him in his methods re- 
tained their respect for him. He was one of the landmarks 
of cycling and we wish he might have been spared to us 
longer. 



74 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Died in New York City, June 28, 1909, Matthew Gibb, a 
life member of the L. A. W., formerly President of the 
Century wheelmen, of New York City and for many years 
an active wheelman. Always ready to do his part. 



WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

I know a man whose face is long, 
He never laughs or sings a song — 
His name is Hope. 

I know a man so grum and cross 
For happiness he's at a loss — 
His name is Smiles. 

I know a man who couldn't tell 
What year it was that Carthage fell — 
His name is Wise. 

I know a man who mops his brow 
And says, "Good Lord, it's sizzling now!' 
His name is Snow. 

I know a man who's always blue, 
No matter what he tries to do — 
His name is Brown. 

I know a man who vows that he 
Will never, never happy be — 
His name is Bliss. 

I know a man who's very high 
And people praise him passing by — 
His name is Lowe. 

I know a man who drags his feet 
And seems too blooming tired to eat — 
His name is Swift. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 75 

JOINED IN 1889. 

A list of those who joined the 'League of American 
Wheelmen in 1889 and are still in good standing. 

543— John M. Campbell, New York City, Feb. 1. 
544— M. A. Tenney, Oswego, N. Y., Feb. 1. 
546— Geo. H. Lane, Allston, Mass., April 5. 
(Now at Buenos Ayres.) 
547 — Wm. H. Gove, Salem, Mass., April 5. 
548— H. W. Sweely, Kane, Pa., April 5. 
553 — Murray Schenck, Artesia, N. M., April 12. 
554 — John j. Fecitt, Dorchester, Mass., April 12. 
555— G. F. Chavel, Buffalo, N. Y., April 12. 
559 — Dr. Louis C. Le Roy, New York City, April 19. 
560 — Albert L. Pope, Hartford, Conn., April 19. 
561 — Eli Silverburg, St. Louis, Mo., April 19. 
562 — Harry Shlauderman, Decatur, 111., April 26. 
563 — Wm. H. Bacon, West Newton, Mass., April 26. 
564 — James H. Grover, Lynn, Mass., April 26. 
565 — George W. Nash, Wollaston, Mass., April 26. 
566 — J., Milton Erwin, Paris, , France, April 26. 
567— Frank S. Hoyt, Worcester, Mass., April 26. 
569 — John F. Giering, Nazareth, Pa., May 3. 
570 — George Vaux, Jr., Philadelphia^ Pa., May 3. 
571— Wm. H. Porter, New York City, May 10. 
573— Richard Pinksohn, Allston, Mass., May 17. 
575 — G. Carleton Blake, Providence, R. I., May 17. 
576 — John H. Andrews, Brooklyn, N. Y., May 17. 
577 — Chas. F. Mosser, Allentown, Pa., May 24. 
578— John R. Durfee, Fall River, Mass., May 24. 
578a — John A. Jamison, Jr., Jersey City, N. J., May 24. 
579 — George W. Hubbell, Montclair, N. J., May 24. 
580 — Robert R. Heme, Rockport, Mass., May 24. 
581 — Reuben S. Swan, Brookline, Mass., June 7. 
582 — Percy M. Reese, Baltimore, Md., June. 7. 
583 — Paul Schissel, Brooklyn, N. Y., June 7. 
584 — John N. Brooks, Torrington, Conn., June 7. 
585 — Wm. M. P. Bowen, Providence, R. I., June 21. 
587 — Lewis D. Castor, Rochester, N. Y., June 21. 
588 — Thomas Ward, Hackensack, N. J., July 5. 
589— D. Henry Rosell, Philadelphia, Pa., July 5. 
591 — Thomas • S. Byrne, Philadelphia, Pa., July 26. 



76 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

592-^Mrs. John S. Bagby, Rushville, 111., July 26. 
593 — Walter E. Swan," Boston, Mass., Aug. 16. 
594— W. C. F. Reichenbach, Topeka, Kan., Aug. 30. 
595 — R. C. Craigie, Chicago, 111., Sept. 6. 
596— Arthur B. Smith, Hartford, Conn., Sept. 13. 
597—I. H. Tifft, New York City, Sept. 20. 
599 — Geo. G. Greenburg, Chicago, 111., Sept. 20. 
601 — Joel C. Bolan, Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 27. 
607 — Frederick Colson, Detroit, Mich., Nov. 22. 
608 — James R. Brewer, Baltimore, Md. ,Nov. 22. 
609 — Wm. C. Shapleigh, Lockport, N. Y., Nov. 29. 
611 — Joseph W. Swan, Boston, Mass., Nov. 29. 
615 — Miss Emily B. Mitchell, Washington, D. C, Dec. 27. 
617 — L. E. Boyer, Pittsburg, Pa., Dec. 27. 
Inadvertently omitted from list of 
1887 
471 — Edward M. Heustis, Charlestown, Mass., Oct. 21. 

This includes the list of Pioneers. We had intended to 
stop right here, but there has been so much of a demand 
that we go further, that we shall continue the lists for a 
while. 



The motor cycle record between New York and 
Boston has been lowered. Joseph Noe, of Jersey 
City, on June 13th last covered the distance of 249 
miles in 20 hours 36 minutes, which is 2 hours 56 
minutes better than was accomplished by Fred I. 
Perreault, of Maiden, Mass., on June 13, 1908. The 
rider left City Hall, New York City at 12.01 A. M. 
and reached Boston City Hall at 8.37 P. M. 



The New Continental Handbook of the C. T. C. 
for 1909-10 is issued. It contains lists of hotels, 
tariffs, etc. The price is one shilling eightpence to 
members only. Our members who take out the C. 
T. C. are allowed the same rate. 



Motoring is now the manly art of self expense. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 77 

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

Here are three chances at trial subscriptions. No foreign 
or Canadian subscriptions taken under this proposition. 
Good until Sept. 30th. 

OFFER NUMBER ONE. 

McClure's Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Pictorial Review 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

World Today 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Youth's Companion 5 cents a copy, 3 weeks . .15 

Modern Priscilla 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Van Norden Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Little Folks 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pacific Monthly 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

ALL FOR ONE DOLLAR VALUE $3.00 

OFFER NUMBER TWO. 

Success Magazine 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pictorial Review 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Van Norden Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Travel Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Modern Priscilla 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pacific Monthly 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Metropolitan Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Youth's Companion 5 cents a copy, 3 weeks .15 

ALL FOR ONE DOLLAR VALUE $3.00 

OFFER NUMBER THREE. 

Pictorial Review 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Modern Priscilla 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Van Norden Magazine 15 cents a copy. 3 months .45 

Mothers' Magazine 5 cents a copy, 3 months .15 

Little Folks 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pacific Monthly 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Health Culture 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Youth's Companion 5 cents a copy, 3 weeks .15 

ALL FOR FIFTY CENTS VALUE $2.55 



ABBOT BASSETT, Subscription Agent 

331 Col a tubas Ave., Boston, Mass. 



78 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

PERIODICAL LIST. 

We publish a list of such periodicals as will allow a dis- 
count to subscribers. Many magazines will not allow the 
list price to be cut. All such we do not schedule. Others 
will not allow price to be cut on a single subscription but 
will give a large discount when a club is formed. Note 
that many of the Periodicals below are designated by a 
letter or by Roman numerals. 

To form a club — Figure Class A at 65 cents; Class B at 
$1.35; Class C at 35 cents. The Roman numerals represent 
25 cents for each figure (VII means $1.75). If the club 
calls for three magazines add 35 cents to combined price. 
That is our profit. If four or more" magazines, add 10 
cents for each magazine for our profit. 

Many of the Magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 

The first column gives list price; the second column, our 
price. 

Ainslee B 1.80 1.80 

American Boy A 1.00 1.00 

American Business Man VII 2.00 2.00 

American Machinist Weekly 4.00 3.80 

American Magazine A 1.00 1.00 

American Photography 1:50 1.35 

Appleton's IV 1.50 1.50 

Atlantic 4-00 3-45 

Automobile . - IX 3.00 3.00 

Automobile Topics 2.00 1.75 

Baseball Magazine . ." IV 1.50 1.25 

Bicvcling World 2.00 1.75 

Bohemian IV 1.50 1.50 

Bookman IX 2.50 2.50 

Book News Monthly Ill 1.00 .90 

Boston Cooking School A 1.00 1.00 

Burr Mcintosh VIII 3-00 3.00 

Busy Man's Magazine V 2.00 2.00 

Camera 1.00 .90 

Camera Craft A 1.00 .90 

Century > 4-00 385 

Children's Magazine (Mrs. Burnett) A 1.00 1.00 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 79 

Cosmopolitan A i.oo i.oo 

Country Life XII 4.00 4.00 

Current Literature IX 3.00 3.00 

Cycle & Auto Trade Journal B 2.00 1.60 

Etude for music lovers IV 1.50 1.50 

Garden A 1.00 1.00 

Good Housekeeping A 1.00 1.00 

Green Bag 4.00 3.75 

Harper Bazar A 1.00 .90 

Harper Magazine or Weekly 4.00 3.45 

Human Life 50 .40 

International Studio XVII 5.00 4.50 

Judge VIII 5.00 4.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 1.75 

Motor Car 1.00 .90 

Motor World 2.00 1.75 

North American Review XIV 4.00 3.75 

Outing B 3.00 3.00 

Photo Era IV 1.50 1.50 

Photographer 2.00 1.65 

Photographic Times IV 1.50 1.50 

Pictorial Review A 1.00 1.00 

Professional & Amateur Photography 1.00 .90 

Puck 5.00 4.25 

Reader B 3.00 2.25 

Recreation B 3.00 2.00 

Review of Reviews B 3.00 3.00 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 

Scientific American & Supplement >. . .7.00 6.00 

Smart Set .B 2.50 2.50 

Suburban Life B 3.00 3.00 

Success A 1.00 1.00 

Table Talk Ill 1.50 1.50 

Technical World IV 1.50 1.50 

World' « Work ^ 3.00 3.00 



ABBOT BASSETT, Subscription Agent 
221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied 








REGULAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTEIBUTEE FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUAETEBS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it ia 
readiness for next season's use: 



Bassett'S Scrap Book 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men Our rates :-#l 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 01.00 an inch. 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ' ox "> wa 

Vol. 7. No. 6 AUGUST, 1909 5 Cents 



THE GO-AWAY TIME. 
To stay at home is in very bad form. Git! 



The flies and mosquitoes also quit the city for the 
country. Our vacation is their busy season. 



Dr. Eliot's list of best books contains none of the 
kind one would care to read 1 in a hammock. Wait 
until Autumn. 



"Don't marry fhe men — fight them," says Mrs. O. 
H. P. Belmont. But why not marry them first? 



Praying for the eradication o>f mosquitoes will not 
accomplish a great deal. You've simply got to hit 
'em and hit 'em hard. 



"So you think he's really in love, eh?" 
"No doubt about it. Why, he thinks she's attrac- 
tive in auto goggles." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



Which meal does a poor bicycle resemble? Break- 
fast. 



82 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

A CYCLING LAMENT. 

(With apologies to the author of an old song.) 
The day is dull, the rain descends, 

I'm sadly situated; 
No kindly tree its shelter lends, 

My tyre is much deflated; 
And, as I wander, far from gay, 

Its flatness does remind me 
That I must walk a weary way 

To the pump I left behind me. 

I took that tyre off before 

I realized my muddle; 
I dropped the nuts upon the floor, 

Or rather in a puddle; 
Then, feeling for the pump, the tear- 

Drops came enough to blind me, 
On finding it so sadly clear 

That the pump was left'behind me. 

Oh, ne'er shall I forget the pang 

That tore my heart on spying 
(With words I now tone down to "hang") 

The pump at home was lying. 
I've prayed for long, and prayed in vain 

Some motorist will find me, 
And take me safely home again 

To the pump I left behind me. 

There's not a soul upon the road, 

I'm wet and tired and lonely, 
No man- to ease my sorrow's load, 

No "girl to call me only." 
Of oaths I'm sadly prodigal, 

Severe enough to bind me, 
That henceforth never, never shall 

The pump be left behind me. 

— Irish Cyclist. 



It was a musical man who gave his four daugh- 
ters the following names: Do-re, Mi-fa, So-la, Ti-do. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 83 

The first escaped with the nickname Dora, the sec- 
ond answered Miffy, the third owned up to Solly, 
while the youngest generally got Tiddy. 



Before automobiles were invented, what did peo- 
ple do who were in a hurry? 



T. K. Hastings holds the record for time on a 
motorcycle from New T York to Boston and return, 
486 miles in 26 1/2 hours. Made June, 25. Count 
the towns and cities through which he passed to find 
out how many times he broke the law. 



A scientist declares that every time a man lies he 
unconsciously wriggles his big toe. Blessed is the 
man who invented shoes. 



$122,000,000 spent for automobiles last year. The 
amount will reach $200,000,000 this year. The auto- 
ists seem to have about all the money there is. 



The future's uncertain. Don't "scorch" in 'this 
world. 



"Care will kill a cat," but the cat doesn't care. 
Now if it would only kill mosquitoes! 



In answer to many inquiries we will again an- 
nounce that numbers will be changed next fall and 
new numbers will be issued in 1910. 



The Wheel About the Hub will start this year on 
the Saturday preceding Labor Day and will con- 



84 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

tinue the next two days. A large turn out is ex- 
pected. Many will come from New York and Phila- 
delphia. Changing the date to Labor Day will lead 
to a much larger attendance than usual. 



The iceman, like the politician, never gets tired of 
delivering his little piece. 



It's when the thermometer stands high in the 
community that it gets glared and glowered at. 



As against the 41,000 motor vehicles all told in 
Germany there are more than 160,000 automobiles 
in the United States, or twice the number in use 
throughout all Europe. In New York state alone 
there are about 70,000 cars registered. 



If dogs think, as a scientist says, why is it that 
some of them stick so everlastingly close to a worth- 
less man? 



The thirty million people of the Turkish empire 
are still practically without motor cars. The gov- 
ernment is now about to spend several million dol- 
lars on good roads and between Damascus and Bag- 
dad a motor car service is likely to be established 
soon. 



In Massachusetts anyone "who operates a motor 
vehicle for the purpose of making a record" shall be 
punished by fine up to $200 or imprisonment up to 
six months or both. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 85 

The National Assembly is down for September 3d. 
New officers will be nominated and several items of 
special business will be considered. A dinner at 
Hendrie's will lead off the ceremonies. 



Will it never down? The motorcyclists are hav- 
ing exciting discussions over the amateur question. 
Greed comes with speed and it is no easy matter 
putting on the check rein. 

Dear Old Scrap Book. — An old-time member of 
the L. A. W. and an always-to-be member, I am 
sending, with my renewal, a message from the back- 
woods of Illinois. I ride the wheel every day and it 
helps me in my business. I am a letter carrier, and 
I want to tell you how I saved time and had a lot of 
pleasure on one of my trips. The roads were hard 
and I was pretty well done up early in the game. I 
came to a grove where they were holding a picnic, 
and will you believe it, I found at that grove every- 
one for whom I had a letter in my pouch. It was a 
quick delivery and I had time to take in the picnic. 
Great is the wheel. I have five men to whom I de- 
liver Scrap Books and they read it before they do 
their letters. Ex-Racer. 



Springfield again to be a centre of the racing in- 
terest. Jack Prince has built a third of a mile board 
track of the most approved kind in the old time cy- 
cling centre. The track is unique in that it is in the 
form of a true circle, 560 feet in diameter on the in- 
side, and measuring a full third of a mile in circum- 



86 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

ference at the pole line. All intricate problems as to 
the proper curves and banking turns into straight 
stretches are eliminated by reason of its being cir- 
cular instead of elliptical, the track being banked at 
40 degrees uniformly all around. The structure is 
located about three miles from the business centre 
of Springfield, close to a trolley line, and will be pro- 
vided with ample dressing room accommodations for 
the riders and great seating capacity for the specta- 
tors. The ground on which it is built is perfectly 
level, and in addition to motorcycle racing the im- 
mense amphitheatre will in its centre afford an 
arena for baseball or football games and other forms 
of athletic sport. Jack used to set the benches aroar 
but the fellows who knew him then know him no 
more. 



Walking. Chapter Five. Concerning Girls. — The 
modern girl is at her worst when she walks. Her 
feet are dressed in low shoes with high heels, and 
her stride is out of all proportion to her height. Her 
right arm is swung vigorously back and forth, while 
the left one clutches a handbag, and holds it at the 
waist line, with elbow aggressive. Her chest is de- 
pressed and her head, with its marvelous adornment, 
is thrust forward. 

When a girl walks heavily she is always walking 
incorrectly, and is never graceful. Girls are not al- 
together to blame for this, as they are told from 
childhood to "throw their shoulders back," which 
has a tendency to put the weight on the heels, a 
strain on the back, and to throw the head forward. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 87 

Instead, the young should be told to throw the chest 
forward, and the head and shoulders will take their 
right position. Correct poise leaves each organ free 
to do its work, especially the lungs and diaphragm, 
upon whose action we depend for the very breath of 
life- 
Poise — or right position of the body — is the first 
essential for health or grace. In order that there 
shall be no pressure on any organ in standing, or 
strain in walking, the weight must always be over 
the balls of the feet. This may easily be acquired by 
rising on them, then letting the heels go slowly 
down, without tipping the body back. From this 
simple exercise one soon forms the habit of keeping 
the weight well forward — the centre of gravity fall- 
ing between the insteps. In this position all pres- 
sure is taken off the back, which has borne our 
burdens quite long enough. 



Our fellow-member, Alvey A. Adee, of the State 
Department, Washington, D. C, has returned from 
his annual bicycle tour abroad. Every summer for 
the past twelve years, Adee has taken a European 
cycling trip of about two months. He avoids the 
big cities, making his route through the smaller 
towns, often leaving the beaten paths entirely to 
tour a remote country district which he feels is 
worth investigating. He speaks all the principal 
European languages, most of them with a perfect 
accent, and in his rambles he takes occasion to 
sound the natives as to what they think of their gov- 
ernment, of the United States, of the army, of the 



88 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

other European countries and of things in general. 
With his knowledge of statecraft, his cycling expe- 
ditions result in his having a quite accurate gauge 
on popular sentiment in foreign countries. 

"Never have I enjoyed anything so much as the 
cycle tour which I have been having the past two 
months/' said Adee, as he stepped of! the steamer 
a few days ago. "I left the United States on April 
15, taking my holiday in France this time. I cycled 
for 56 days, carrying all the clothes I needed. It 
was the greatest sort of sport. If Secretary Hay 
had followed my practice of summer cycling tours, 
he would be alive today. During my trip I covered 
about 1,700 miles, and I am now prepared to return 
to the hot weather terrors of Washington without 
fear." Among its terrors may be mentioned the 
carelessness of workmen. One of his first experi- 
ences came near being serious. Mr. Adee was 
standing near his bicycle on the basement floor of 
the department, under an open shaft formed by the 
circular stairway. Workmen above were moving a 
section of a filing cabinet to the second floor. In 
some manner they released their hold, and the cab- 
inet pitched over the stairway railing to the base- 
ment. Mr. Adee, who was standing within a few 
feet of the cabinet, was not hurt. 



When we do a thing it is well to know just why 
we do it. There must be a thought before every 
action. The simple act of sending a shirt to the 
laundry involves varied psychological states. A. F. 
Sheldon of Libertyville, 111., tells us what occurs. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 89 

"First the man feels an interest in sending his shirt 
to be laundered," says Mr. Sheldon. "But before 
he actually does the deed his mind must be built up 
to the intenseness of his desire. The desire must 
blaze up until it melts the will. It is not until the 
will is touched that the decision is really made to 
have the work done." Did you know it? 



According to "The Regiment" (English), General 
Sir Charles Douglas once said: "Give me 10,000 
well-disciplined cyclists, and I will guarantee to hold 
up any invading army that attempts to land on our 
shores." In this connection he tells an amusing 
story. He was carrying out some cyclist manoeu- 
vres a few years ago, and arrived at one position 
where he found a troop of men sitting calmly under 
a hedge watching an opposing force of cyclists rap- 
idly approaching them. He called the attention of 
the subaltern in command to the fact that he was in 
danger of being cut off from his main body, and 
asked him what steps he proposed to take. The 
reply he got considerably astonished him. "Don't 
you worry about those chaps, sir," said the young 
officer, "I have peppered their road pretty well with 
sixpenny worth of tin-tacks. Wait till they get off 
to mend their punctures and I will round the whole 
of them up in something like no time." 



Misery loves company — but it's tough on the 
company. 



90 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY. 

The Annual Meeting of the National Assembly, L. A. 
W., will be held at Hendrie's, Talbot Avenue, Dorchester, 
Mass., on Friday evening, September 3. 

Those who so desire can join in a dinner prepared for us 
by mine host Hendrie at 6 p. m. same day. Kindly notify 
Secretary Bassett on or before September 1 if you intend 
to be present at the dinner. 

Fraternally, 

Abbot Bassett, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 
Walter M. Meserole, 

President. 



CAN THEY BE FOUND? 

We should be very glad to have the addresses of the 
following members. They are life members of years ago 
whom we have lost trace of. They do not take the official 
organ and we have lost trace of them. We give the only 
addresses that we have, but these are insufficient and re- 
peated attempts of ours to locate the men have been of 
no avail: 

James P. Downs, Newark, N. J. 

Wm. C. Frazee, New York City. 

George A. Paillard, New York City. 

Neill Campbell, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Aug Henke, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Edward P. Mowton, New York City. 

Chas. D. Williams, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thomas Hockley, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Richard Dallett, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harold R. Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henry A. Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Arthur P. Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frank N. Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Richard Dallett, Philadelphia, Pa. 

I. Clarence Marsh, Chicago, 111. 

A. C. Stewart, St. Louis, Mo. 

George Martin Huss, New York City. 

Frank Detwiler, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chas. A. Snyder, Philadelphia, Pa. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 91 



Ed L. Fry, Harrisburg, Pa. 

A. F. Snyder, Weissport, Pa. 
Edward E. Mead, Springfield, Mass. 
David H. Ludlow, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry H. Ludlow,, Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. S. Stursburg, Jr., Holyoke, Mass. 
Wm. McD. Lee, Lyndhurst, Va. 

B. J. Holcombe, Detroit, Mich. 
John B. Roberts, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Frank Stevens, 'Harrisburg, Pa. 
H. W. Arnold, Binghamton, N. Y. 
H. G. Latimer, Wilmington, N. C. 



JOINED IN 1890. 

A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1890 and are still in good standing. 

618 — Henry G. Chamberlain, Chelsea, Mass., Jan. 3. 

620 — Samuel A. Miles, New York City, Jan. 10. 

621— Archie D. Mower, Auburn, Me., Jan. 31. 

622 — Harry C. G. Ellard, Cincinnati, O., Jan. 31. 

624— J. B. Rich, Philadelphia, Pa., March 7. 

626 — Frederick A. Fernald, Buffalo, N. Y., April 4, 

627 — H. C. Huntress, Boston, Mass., April 4. 

629— John F. Clark, Great Kills, N. Y., April 4. 

631 — Wm. F. Reinecke, Guttenberg, la., April 4. 

633 — Albert R. Farrington, Portland, Me., April 11. 

634 — W. B. Daoust, Defiance, O., April 11. 

635 — Francis H. Smith, Hartford, Conn., April 11. 

636 — J. Roy Brown, Quincy, 111., April 11. 

640 — Chas. J. Sayers, Hoosick Falls, N. Y., April 25. 

641— John W. Robson, Maiden, Mass., May 2. 

645 — Penrose Fell, Philadelphia. Pa., May 2. 

646— H. G. Irwin, Philadelphia, Pa., May 2. 

649— C. Lee Abell, Buffalo, N. Y., May 16. 

652 — John Pagan, Jr., Yonkers, N. Y., May 16. 

653 — Harry V. Casey, Baltimore, Pa., May 16. 

654 — A. M. Mattice, South Boston, Mass., May 16. 

658 — Chas. F. Libby, Lowell, Mass., May 23. 

661 — Herman S. Hering, Concord, N. H., May 23. 

662— B. Todd Crutcher, Frankford, Ky., May 30. 

663 — Jonathan Ormerod, Lawrence, Mass., June 6. 



92 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

665 — Wm. O. Wiley, Charlestown, Mass., June 6. 

666 — A. A. Burnand, Los Angeles, Cal., June 6. 

668 — W. Linn De Beck, Cincinnati, O., June 13. 

672 — George Y. McCracken, Philadelphia, Pa., June 20. 

674 — J. T. F. Bruckner, Philadelphia, Pa., June 20. 

676 — George T. Bush, Bellefonte, Pa., June 27. 

677 — George C. Wheeler, New York City, July 4. 

678 — Fred W. Sherman, Port Huron, Mich., July 4. 

680 — Duffield Ashmead, Philadelphia, Pa., July 4. 

681— M. J. Gilbert, St. Louis, Mo., July 4. 

684 — George E. Schaut, Philadelphia, Pa., July 11. 

685— Martin Stotz,- Philadelphia, Pa., July 11. 

686 — George H. Lokes, Philadelphia, Pa., July 11. 

687— Dr. Clarence J. Blake, Boston, July 18. 

688— E. T. McManus, New York, N. Y., July 18. 

691 — Jesse Scribner, Chicago, 111., July 25. 

694— Mrs. T. F. Myler, Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. 1. 

695 — J. L. Lowther, Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. 1. 

696 — John S. Driver, Riverside, 111., Aug. 1. 

697 — Martin C. Rotier, Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 1. 

699 — Ernst Z. Bower, Olney, 111., Aug. 8. 

705— J. T. Mclntyre, Baltimore, Md., Aug. 15. 

706 — L. Owen Miner, New York City, Aug. 15. 

707 — Morris Barker, Lawrence, Mass., Aug. 22. 

710 — Walter South, Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 29. 

711 — C. E. Snyder, Lowell, Mass., Sept. 5. 

713 — James J. Hunt, Wakefield, R. I., Sept. 12. 

715 — Albert S. Comstock, Norwich, Conn., Sept. 19. 

717 — Francis H. Easby, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 26. 

718 — George L. Wadsworth, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 26. 

719— John O. Varley, Hyde Park, N. Y., Oct. 3. 

720 — George T. Stebbins, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 10. 

721 — P. A. Meserole, Ridgefield. N. J., Oct. 17. 

722 — Harry C. Allen, Yonkers, N. Y., Oct. 31. 

725 — E. O. Chase, Newark, N. J., Nov. 21. 

726 — Ernest Eakin, Cameron. Mo., Nov. 28. 

727 — E. H. Hammer, New York City, Dec. 5. 

729 — George F. Tenney, Pittsburg, Pa., Dec. 19. 



Had there never been a yowling feline we never 
should have known the priceless worth of a catless 
night. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 93 

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

Here are three chances at trial subscriptions. No foreign 
or Canadian subscriptions taken under this proposition. 
Good until Sept. 30th. 

OFFER NUMBER ONE. 

McClure's Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Pictorial Review 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

World Today 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Youth's Companion 5 cents a copy, 3 weeks .15 

Modern Priscilla 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Van Norden Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Little Folks 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pacific Monthly 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

ALL FOR ONE DOLLAR VALUE $3.00 

OFFER NUMBER TWO. 

Success Magazine 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pictorial Review 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Van Norden Magazine ....15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Travel Magazine 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Modern Priscilla 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pacific Monthly 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Metropolitan Magazine ....15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Youth's Companion 5 cents a copy, 3 weeks .15 

ALL FOR ONE DOLLAR VALUE $3.00 

OFFER NUMBER THREE. 

Pictorial Review 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Modern Priscilla 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Van Norden Magazine 15 cents a copy. 3 months .45 

Mothers' Magazine 5 cents a copy, 3 months .15 

Little Folks 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Pacific Monthly 15 cents a copy, 3 months .45 

Health Culture 10 cents a copy, 3 months .30 

Youth's Companion 5 cents a copy, 3 weeks .15 

ALL FOR FIFTY CENTS VALUE $7^ 

ABBOT BASSETT, Subscription Agent, 

321 Columbus A_ve., Boston. Mass. 



94 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

PERIODICAL LIST. 

We publish a list of such periodicals as will allow a dis- 
count to subscribers. Many magazines will not allow the 
list price to be cut. All such we do not schedule. Others 
will not allow price to be cut on a single subscription but 
will give a large discount when a club is formed. Note 
that many of the Periodicals below are designated by a 
letter or by Roman numerals. 

To form a club — Figure Class A at 65 cents; Class B at 
$1.35; Class C at 35 cents. The Roman numerals represent 
25 cents for each figure (VII means $175). If the club 
calls for three magazines add 35 cents to combined price. 
That is our profit. If four or more magazines, add 10 
cents for each magazine for our profit. 

Many of the Magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 

The first column gives list price; the second column, our 
price. 

Ainslee . B 1.80 1.80 

American Boy A 1.00 1.00 

American Business Man VII 2.00 2.00 

American Machinist Weekly 4.00 3.80 

American Magazine A 1.00 1.00 

American Photography 1.50 1.35 

Appleton's IV 1.50 1.50 

Atlantic 400 3.45 

Automobile IX 3.00 3.00 

Automobile Topics 2.00 1.75 

Baseball Magazine IV 1.50 1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Bohemian IV 1.50 1.50 

Bookman IX 2.50 2.50 

Book News Monthly Ill 1.00 .90 

Boston Cooking School A 1.00 1.00 

Burr Mcintosh VIII 3.00 3.00 

Busy Man's Magazine V 2.00 2.00 

Camera 1.00 .90 

Camera Craft A 1.00 .90 

Century 4-0O 3.85 

Children's Magazine (Mrs. Burnett) A 1.00 1.00 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 95 

Cosmopolitan A i.oo i.oo 

Country Life „ . . XII 4.00 4.00 

Current Literature IX 3.00 3.00 

Cycle & Auto Trade Journal B 2.00 1.60 

Etude for music lovers IV 1.50 1.50 

Garden . . A 1.00 1.00 

Good Housekeeping A 1.00 1.00 

Green Bag 4.00 3.75 

Harper Bazar A 1.00 .00 

Harper Magazine or Weekly 4.00 3.45 

Human Life 50 .40 

International Studio XVII 5.00 4.50 

Judge VIII 5.00 4.50 

Life 5-O0 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 175 

Motor Car '. 1.00 .90 

Motor World 2.00 1.75 

North American Review XIV 4.00 3.75 

Outin£ B 3.00 3.00 

Photo Era IV 1.50 1.50 

Photographer 2.00 1.65 

Photographic Times IV 1.50 1.50 

Pictorial Review A 1.00 1.00 

Professional & Amateur Photography 1.00 .00 

Puck 5.00 4.25 

Reader B 3.00 2.25 

Recreation B 3.00 2.00 

Review of Reviews B 3.00 3.00 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific A merican 3.00 2.75 

Scientific American & Supplement 7.00 6.00 

Smart Set B 2.50 2.50 

Suburban Life B 3.00 3.00 

Success .....A 1.00 1.00 

Table Talk ITT 1.50 1.50 

Technical World IV 1.50 1.50 

World'" Work 3.00 3.00 



ABBOT 3ASSETT, Subscription Agent 
221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 



HSr 




BBGtTLAR 



IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTEE FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



BaSSett'S Scrap Boof< 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates:— #1. 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 81.00 an inch 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 7 SEPTEMBER, 1909 5 Cents 



This issue will go to many who are in arrears for 
dues. We hope it will prompt them to their duty. 
We shall renumber the members this winter and we 
want as many of the old-timers in line as it is pos- 
sible for us to obtain. In the process of renumber- 
ing we fill up all blank spaces and in order to rein- 
state a delinquent after that we have to duplicate 
numbers. We hope this will prove a missionary to 
bring back to the fold the sheep that have strayed 
awav. 



TO SCORCH IS A BURNING SHAME. 



The Touring Club de France has received a legacy 
of $50,000 to be devoted to afforestation of suitable 
places. 



The F. A. M. is hotly discussing the amateur 
question. This seems like a leaf from the past. 
Under the amateur proposition is an idea worth 
tying to and we hope our friends of the motorcycle 
cause will stand pat. 



Rivers do their work without leaving" their beds. 



98 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Several cases of stolen bicycles this month. There 
are those who wonder where thieves find the wheels 
to steal. 



The Wheel About the Hub every year brings to- 
gether old-timers from all about. Wheelmen come 
to it from New York, Philadelphia, Connecticut and 
occasionally from California. The wonder is that 
other cities do not follow the example that Boston 
has set for them. 



A lady on a wheel is a rare sight now-a-days unless 
it be one on the road to work. The touring lady 
awheel is seldom seen, more's the pity. 



Roller skating went out; cycling has to a large 
extent gone out; will walking ever go out? Cer- 
tainly! Man tried to push it out when he took to 
the bicycle. He found it too hard work. He gave 
the cycle up for the automobile and now he is look- 
ing ahead to a flying machine. The coming man 
will not walk. 



The Bicycling World has started a memorial fund 
to be used in' providing a suitable memorial for the 
late Colonel Pope. 



We are asked, "Who is the Dean of Cycling now 
that Colonel Pope has left us?" Can't say! There 
is a whole procession of old fellows who are still 
pushing the wheel, but many of them would resent 
the imputation of "old fellow" behind the designa- 
tion of "Dean." 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 99 

That was a representative crowd of old-time 
wheelmen at Colonel Pope's funeral. Very many of 
those who were at the beginning of things were pres- 
ent. Henry Clay Barnabee, General Nelson A. 
Miles, Edgar L. Davenport now a well-known actor 
but an enthusiastic wheelman in the eighties, Lon 
Peck, Albert S. Parsons, C. Fred Joy, M. L. Bridg- 
man, Charres E. Walker, Wilbur Walker, H. S. 
Lienhard, Abbot Bassett and many others, repre- 
senting cycling clubs and the trade. 



W. W. Stall, once a cycler, later an autoist, met 
with a serious accident on the road last month, near 
the town of Grafton. He was driving his auto at the 
intersection of two roads when he saw another auto 
coming down the hill of a cross street. It was im- 
possible to avoid a collision by stopping and so Mr. 
Stall put on all speed to run by. The other auto, 
driven by a Mr. Rixford of Providence, struck the 
rear wheel of the Stall machine and overthrew it, 
throwing the occupants out and badly damaging the 
machine. Mr. Stall was picked up in an insensible 
condition and it was found that he had a broken 
collar bone and severe internal injuries. The other 
occupants of the Stall auto, were Mrs. Stall and Mr. 
and Mrs. Clarence H. Pratt of Grafton. They es- 
caped with a few bruises. The people in the Rixford 
car escaped injury. Mr. Stall was taken to the home 
of Mr. Pratt in Grafton and for some time there was 
doubt of his recovery; but temperate habits and a 
strong constitution helped him through and he is 
now verv much the same Stall that he used to be 



100 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

The meeting of the National Assembly and the 
Wheel About the Hub will have occurred when this 
number of the Scrap Book is issued. And yet we 
can have no report of either. A monthly periodical 
cannot well give quick news. We could have de- 
layed the September issue for a week and got both 
reports in but we believe it better to run in the 
grooves and not try to cross country by getting out 
of them. Both will appear next month. 



Walking. Chapter Six. — Which foot walks faster? 
You may think this a very silly question to ask, but 
it isn't. It is a simple, demonstrable fact, which you 
can prove to your own satisfaction in a very few 
minutes. If you will take a pavement that is clear, 
so that there will be no interference, and walk 
briskly in the center, you will find that before you 
have gone fifty yards you have veered very much to 
one side. You must not make any effort, of course, 
to keep in the center, but if you will think of some- 
thing and endeavor to walk naturally you cannot 
keep a direct line. The explanation of this lies in 
the propensity of one foot to walk faster than the 
other, or one leg takes a longer stride than the 
other, causing one to walk to one side. You can 
try an experiment in this way by placing two sticks 
about eight feet apart, then stand off about sixty 
feet, blindfold yourself and endeavor to walk be- 
tween them. You will find it almost impossible. 



As against the 41,000 motor vehicles all told in 
Germany there are more than 160,000 automobiles 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 101 

in the United States, or twice the number in use 
throughout all Europe. In New York state alone 
there are about 70,000 cars registered. — August 
Scrap Book. 

H. L. T. writes: I doubt very much whether any 
part of the above is correct. Europe is the home of 
the automobile and motorcycle and other form of 
self-propelling vehicle. They have advanced well 
beyond the United States in the manufacture and use 
of these vehicles and the best makes are all from 
abroad. Probably more cheap cars are made here. 
The much finer roads of Great Britain, France and 
other leading countries of Europe, make motoring a 
pleasure, which it is not in this country, except in a 
few locations, as New Jersey, Massachusetts, a small 
part of New York State and Connecticut. It is only 
in the good road districts of this country that the 
auto is in use and such districts are in the vast 
minority, as you and every member of the League 
knows. Unfortunately, we have the worst common 
roads of any civilized country and what few good 
roads we have are due to the League and its mem- 
bers. Take the publications of the good roads 
division of the United States Bureau of Agriculture 
and read what is said about the few miles of good 
roads compared to the thousands of miles of 
wretched roads. New Jersey was the pioneer state 
in the good road movement and it is therefore rather 
natural that it should be the mecca for autos. In 
proportion to population, more cars are licensed and 
in use in New Jersey than any other state. 



102 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Automobiles were registered in 1908 as per- the 
following list: Pa., 25,179; N. J., 21,948; Mass., 17,- 
500; N.'Y., 15,480; Ohio, 11,030; all the States, 128,- 
283. 



The threads of life run smoothly when we spin 
them on a bicycle. 



The moon is shining this month and trying to 
compensate us for the short days. No use! shrimps 
are not whales and the moon is not the sun. Oh for 
a party that would make a constitutional amendment 
that would give us long days the year around. Peo- 
ple go to the Legislature for about everything they 
want and why not make the sun work longer hours? 



THE MOONLIGHT RUN. 

The moon shines bright! 

What a lovely sight 
To mount the wheel for a quiet spin, 
After the cares, the toil and din 

Of a busy day. 

To swiftly wheel 

Or silently steal 
Through the phantom shadows which bend and sway 
'Neath the rattling trees in this midnight day. 

Hark to the tinkle! 
The pretty stars twinkle 
And wink at the moon as the wheels glide by. 
For they love the quick stroke 
Of the glittering spoke. 
But they don't like the honk of the auto behind. 



Some things had better be left unsaid, if they can- 
not be left unthought. There is trouble in Indian- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 103 

apolis over the statement made by Dr. Charles A. 
PfarHin, chairman of the executive committee of the 
Indianapolis Humane Society, that "no girl who 
rides a motorcycle is respectable." As a result of the 
storm of criticism he evoked, Dr. Pfafflin explained 
that he did not include married women who rode 
with their husbands in this category. Now the 
maiden ladies are hunting for him with hat pins. 



You can ride a rented wheel, but not a rented tire. 



Boston man says a diet of nuts and pie will make 
the ordinary life longer than that of Methuselah. 
Apple, peach, lemon, pumpkin, currant, cherry, rhu- 
barb, custard or mince? With cheese, or without? 



The road census undertaken by the Mass. High- 
way Commission should produce much suggestive 
information. It will be of value to determine the 
prevailing routes of highway travel and also to de- 
termine the percentage of motor-driven and horse- 
drawn vehicles. In the future perfection of the 
highway system of the state it may be possible to 
simplify the problem of regulation and improve the 
general service by a better classification of travel. 
Between two general urban points it will be found 
iti many cases a simple matter to provide two equally 
convenient routes, one for motor cars and one for 
horse-drawn vehicles, neither exclusively restricted 
to their especial class, but each naturally attracting 
its own. It has been made clearly apparent that 
highway construction for motor cars presents a 
problem different from that of serving other forms 



104 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

of traffic, and the highway commission of the future 
may be called on to differentiate between motor- 
routes and the general highway. 



A friend of ours says his bicycle is almost human. 
While riding the other night he heard an odd noise, 
and he is certain it was his front wheel spoke. 



THREE PUSHES OF THE PEN. 

This life would bring me few regrets, 
If I could see its struggle out 

With cash to pay my daily debts 
An' not enough to fight about. 



A tramp, in Vermont, was so hungry, they say, 
That he ate everything they could put in his way. 
He swallowed the table and clamored for more, 
Then he went for the cupboard and bolted the door. 



Raised to the mem'ry of a cyclist bold, 
Who in this life o'er many a "Century" rolled. 
He took a header while his wheel was bowling, 
And now the Centuries will do the rolling. 



There is an ancie"nt legend which tells us that 
when a man first achieved a most notable deed he 
wished to explain to his tribe what he had done. As 
soon as he began to speak, however, he was smitten 
with dumbness, he lacked words and sat down. 
Then there arose a masterless man, one who had 
taken no part in the action of his fellow, who had 
no special virtues, but afflicted — that is the phrase 
— with the magic of the necessary words. He saw, 
he told, he described the merits of the notable deed 
in such fashion, we are assured, that the words "be- 
came alive and walked up and down in the hearts of 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 105 

all his hearers." Thereupon the tribe, seeing that 
the words were certainly alive, and fearing lest the 
man with the words would hand down untrue tales 
about them to their children they took and killed 
him. But later they saw that the magic was in the 
words, not in the man. — Kipling. 



The professor of psychology at Wellesley throws 
.down the gauntlet when declaring that woman is 
man's equal in every respect. No exception quali- 
fies this thundering statement and man might as 
well hide his head and let the storm pass by. , What 
is to be the effect on impressionable young women 
of such teachings one fears to imagine, for Prof. 
Eleanor A. McGamble also adds: "Woman is, if 
anything, superior to man in every occupation." 
This is rubbing it in. Isn't it singular that mascu- 
line cooks, milliners and dressmakers get the top 
wages? 



ALBERT AUGUSTUS POPE. 

Died at Cohasset, Mass., Aug. 10, 1909, Colonel Albert 
Augustus Pope, born in Brookline, May 20, 1843. 

Few men were more respected or more widely known in 
Boston, Mass., or even America, than Colonel Pope. 

He began his career as a plowboy at the age of nine 
years; was a marketer of garden produce before he was 
13; commanded a company of home guards when he was 
18, and fought at the head of a company of the 35th Mass. 
infantry on a Virginia battlefield before he was 19. 

To the call of President Lincoln in 1863 for 300,000 three- 
year volunteers the 35th Massachusetts regiment responded, 
and on August 22, at the age of 19, Albert A. Pope was 
commissioned as second lieutenant of Co. I. 

When Washington was threatened' by the confederate 
army's advance, Captain Pope was chosen to organize a pro- 



106 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

vincial regiment from the convalescent camp at Alexandria. 
He had it ready to march in 12 hours, and led it into action 
at Fort Slocum and Fort Stevens. 

When but 21 years of age he was in command of Fort 
Hell at Petersburg, and at the last attack led his regiment 
into the city. 

Colonel Pope served through the war, having risen to the 
colonelcy of his old regiment. At the close of the war he 
returned to his former employers, but soon went into busi- 
ness for himself in the manufacture and sale of shoe manu- 
facturers' supplies. 

In 1876 the first imported bicycles began to make their 
appearance in this country, and Colonel Pope, scenting an 
opportunity, decided to start manufacturing them in the 
United States. 

The venture proved a success from the start. A craze for 
bicycling that even the high price of the early machines 
could not stem swept over the country, and in the very first 
few years of his business he amassed a fortune. 

But Colonel Pope did not stop with his bicycle business. 
Good bicycles required good roads, and he set out to edu- 
cate the public, and he put $60,000 into the Wheelman mag- 
azine, which afterwards developed into Outing. 

In 1892 the movement was well started, but Pope kept 
on. For years he endowed a special department of road 
engineering in the Institute of Technology and induced the 
Harvard authorities to introduce it in the Lawrence Scien- 
tific School. 

The turning point in his career came to him when he 
went into the bicycle trust. From that moment his brilliant 
career took a downward turn and the later years of his life 
were largely taken up with the endeavor to save his fortune 
from a total wreck. 

One of his benefactions was the Pope dispensary build- 
ing, costing $30,000, a gift to the New England hospital for 
women and children, on Fayette Street, to commemorate 
the long professional services of his sisters, Drs. Emily F. 
and C. Augusta Pope, and their associates in the hospital. 

In 1894 Colonel Pope gave 74 acres of land, worth about 
$100,000, to the city of Hartford — where he had located his 
great industrial plant — to be used as a park and pleasure 
ground. 

In late years Colonel Pope had his home on Common- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 107 

wealth Avenue and a summer residence on Jerusalem Road, 
in Cohasset. 

A life member of the L. A. W., he always held its interest 
at heart and his freauent benefactions have been very 
helpful. 

Colonel Pope married, Sept. 20,. 1871, Miss Abby Linder 
of Newton, by whom he had five children, Albert Linder, 
Margaret Robeits. Harold Linder, Charles Linder and 
Ralph Linder Pope. 

In his will provision is made for his family and for many 
friends, for the Pope Memorial Church, erected in memory 
of his deceased son, Charles Linder Pope, and thirteen 
worthy charities. 

The will is dated June 16, 1905^ and the executors are the 
widow, the sons, Albert L. and Harold L. Pope, Edward 
W. Pope and Robert L. Winkley. 

Colonel Pope was an able, warm-hearted, public-spirited 
gentleman, a man with the courage of his convictions and 
the ability to carry out large enterprises. He had a host 
of warm friends who knew his worth and today pay him 
the tribute of their tears. 



CHARLES W. PIERCE. 



Charles W. Pierce of Brighton, a life member of the L. 
A. W., a wheelman from the beginning of cycling and an 
earnest worker in the cause of cycling and good roads, died 
last month at the age of 66 years. A member of the As- 
sembly for many years, he was always present at its meet- 
ings. He was a man of quiet ways and made little stir in 
any gathering, but his impulses and his ideas were always 
in the riarht direction. 



CAN THEY BE FOUND. 

We should be very glad to have the addresses of the fol- 
lowing members. They are life members of years ago 
whom we have lost trace of. Our friends have helped us 
to many addresses on the list of last month, but the names 
given below are still unaccounted for. 

George A. Paillard, New York City. 

Neill Campbell, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Aug Henke, Schenectady, N. Y. 



108 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Richard Dallett, Philadelphia, Pa. 
I. Clarence Marsh, Chicago, 111. 
Frank Detwiler, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Charles A. Snyder, Philadelphia, Pa. 

A. F. Snyder, Weissport, Pa. 
Edward E. Mead, Springfield, Mass: 
David H. Ludlow, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry H. Ludlow, Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. S. Stursburg, Jr., Holyoke, Mass. 
William McD. Lee, Lyndhurst, Va. 

B. J. Holcombe, Detroit, Mich. 
Frank Stevens, Harrisburg, Pa. 
H. W. Arnold, Binghamton, N. Y. 
H. G. Latimer, Wilmington, N. C. 



JOINED IN 1891. 

A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1891 and are still in good standing. 

729— Wm. H. Lord, N. Y. City, Jan. 2. 

730— E. Ross Elliott, M. D., Montgomery, N. Y., Jan. 30. 

732 — Frank B. Hale, Nashua^ N. H., Jan. 30. 

733— A. F. Buttrick, Everett, Mass., Feb. 20. 

734 — Arthur W. Graham, Bloomfield, N. J., March 13. 

735— H. G. Romaine, N. Y. City, March 13. 

736 — Chas. T. Harrop, Phila., Pa., March 13. 

737 — James C. Tattersall, Trenton, N. J., March 13. 

742 — J. Harris Green, Bellefonte, Pa., April 17. 

743 — Wm. V. Muller, Cincinnati, O., April 17. 

746— Dr. F. A. Myrick, N. Y. City, May 1. 

74&— A. D. Wait, Cohoes, N. Y., May 8. 

749 — Annie Maude Griffin, Jefferson City, Tenn., May 8. 

752— S. S. Gano, Chicago, 111., May 8. 

753 — Frank R. Fritz, Wollaston, Mass., May 15. 

758— J. D. Hegeman, Jr., Montclair, N. J., May 15. 

759— Fred G. W. Runk, Allentown, Pa., May 15. 

760 — Geo. P. Kessberger, Detroit, Mich., May 15. 

761 — Howard L. Burr, Manchester, N. H., May 15. 

762 — Mrs. H. K. Lee, Hartford, Conn., May 22. 

764 — Mrs. Sara L. Bullard, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., May 22. 

765 — Howard L. Coburn. Boston, Mass., May 22. 

771 — E. R. Fisher. Charlestown, Mass., May 29. 

772 — Leonard D. Hunt, Exeter, N. H., June 5. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 109 

773— Albert W. Towne, Salem, Mass., June 5. 

774 — H. R. Terhune, N. Y. City, June 12. 

778— Carl G. Barth, Phila., Pa., June 19. 

779— C. T. Kuckler, New Rochelle, N. Y. f June 19. 

782 — Thomas W. Davis, Peoria, 111., July 3. 

7&3 — L- J- Manning, Morganfieid, Ky., July 13. 

7S6— E. T. Illman, Phila., Pa., July 10. 

787— Ira M. Comstock, M. D., N. Y. Mills, N. Y., July 10. 

792 — E. M. Carpenter, Boston, Mass., July 17. 

794— F. W. Gray, Salida, Col, July 24. 

795— John H. Steele, West Phila., Pa, July 24. 

796 — A. E. Harshaw, Phila, Pa, July 24. 

797 — Joseph B. Hall, Canton, Mass, July 24. 

798 — Dr. Cyrus J. Strong, N. Y. City, July 24. 

803 — E. N. Hines, Detroit, Mich, Aug. 7. 

804 — Frank C. Orr, Pittsburg, Pa, Aug. 7. 

806— J. W. Abendroth, N. Y.City, Aug. 14. 

807 — Daniel A. Cook, Cambridge, Mass, Aug. 14. 

809 — Miss Sarah A. Risley, Pleasantville, N. J. 

810— H. G. Ausbuettel, N. Y. City, Aug. 14. 

811 — Wm. C. Alderson, Overbrook, Pa, Aug. 14. 

812 — Harry L. Beach, Hartford, Conn, Aug. 14. 

813 — C. P. Watson, Peoria, 111, Aug. 14. 

815 — David Longfelder, Newark, N. J, Aug. 21. 

816 — Chas. A. Spaulding, Everett, Mass, Aug. 28. 

817 — Mrs. C. A. Spaulding, Everett, Mass., Aug. 28. 

818— Edward C. Hill, Milwaukee, Wis, Aug. 28. 

819 — Louis Sturcke, New York, N. Y, Sept. 4. 

820 — S. P. Willard, Colchester, Conn, Sept. 4. 

821 — Clovis E. Rounds, Pascoag, R. I, Sept. 4. 

822 — Fred Halstead, Brooklyn, N. Y, Sept. 11. 

823— E. T. Longstreth, Phila, Pa, Sept. 11. 

827 — E. H. Scribner, Beachmont. Mass, Oct. 9. 

829— F. L. Metcalf, Plainfieid, N. J, Oct. 30. 

831 — A. J. Applegate, Wichita, Kan., Nov. 6. 

834 — M. L. Knowlton, Minneapolis, Minn, Nov. 6. 

835 — Mrs. Marion H. Vermilye, N. Y. City, Nov. 6. 

836 — Marion H. Vermilye, N. Y. City, Nov. 6. 

837 — F. R. Hazard, Syracuse, N. Y, Nov. 13. 

840 — Chas. F. Glover, Haverhill, Mass, Nov. 20. 

841 — David Wickliffe, Columbus, O, Nov. 20. 

842— Robert Gentle, Elizabeth, N. J., Dec. 11. 

843 — W. F. Fletcher, West Somerville, Mass., Dec. 11. 



110 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

PERIODICAL LIST. 

We publish a list of such periodicals as will allow a dis- 
count to subscribers. Many magazines will not allow the 
list price to be cut. All such we do not schedule. Others 
will not allow price to be cut on a single subscription but 
will give a large discount when a club is formed. Note 
that many of the Periodicals below are designated by a 
letter or by Roman numerals. 

To form a club — Figure Class A at 65 cents; Class B at 
$1.35; Class C at 35 cents. The Roman numerals represent 
25 cents for each figure (VII means $1.75). If the club 
calls for three magazines add 35 cents to combined price. 
That is our profit. If four or more magazines, add 10 
cents for each magazine for our profit. 

Many of the Magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 

The first column gives list price; the second column, our 
price. 

Ainslee -. B 1.80 1.80 

American Boy A 1.00 1.00 

American Busiress Man VII 2.00 2.00 

American Machinist Weekly 4.00 3.80 

American Magazine A 1.00 1.00 

American Photography 1.50 1.35 

Appleton's IV 1.50 1.50 

Atlantic 400 3-45 

Automobile IX 3.00 3.00 

Automobile Topics 2.00 1.75 

Baseball Magazine IV 1.50 1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Bohemian IV 1.50 1.50 

Bookman IX 2.50 2.50 

Book News Monthly Ill 1.00 .90 

Boston Cooking School A 1.00 1.00 

Burr Mcintosh VIII 3.00 3.00 

Busy Man's Magazine V 2.00 2.00 

Camera 1.00 .90 

Camera Craft A 1.00 .90 

Century 4-00 3.85 

Children's Magazine (Mrs. Burnett) A 1.00 1.00 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 111 

Cosmopolitan A i.oo i.oo 

Country Life XII 4.00 4.00 

Current Literature IX 3.00 3.00 

Cycle & Auto Trade Journal B 2.00 1.60 

Etude for music lovers IV 1.50 1.50 

Garden A 1.00 1.00 

Good Housekeeping A 1.00 1.00 

Green Bag 4.00 3.75 

Harper Bazar A 1.00 .90 

Harper Magazine or Weekly 4.00 3.45 

Human Life 50 .40 

International Studio XVII 5.00 4.50 

Judge VIII 5.00 4-SO 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 1.75 

Motor Car 1.00 .90 

Motor World 2.00 1.75 

North American Review XIV 4.00 3.75 

Outin£ B 3.00 3.00 

Photo Era IV 1.50 1.50 

Photographer 2.00 1.65 

Photographic Times IV 1.50 1.50 

Pictorial Review A 1.00 1.00 

Professional & Amateur Photography 1.00 .90 

Puck 5.00 4.25 

Reader B 3.00 2.25 

Recreation B 3.00 2.00 

Review of Reviews B 3.00 3.00 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 

Scientific American & Supplement 7.00 6.00 

Smart Set B 2.50 2.50 

Suburban Life B 3.00 3.00 

Success A 1.00 1.00 

Table Talk Ill 1.50 1.50 

Technical World IV 1.50 1.50 

World'« Work .3.00 3.00 



ABBOT BASSETT, Subscription Agent 
221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 




SOsS^- 



RHGUL.A.R IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTEE FOB 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOB 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Bassett'SS'CrtpBooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OP THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#l. 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, gl.OO an inch! 

Entered L as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 8 OCTOBER, 1909 5 Cents 



OCTOBER 15, 1909. 
It is a full month since we wrote you, in Septem- 
ber, and now we are in the middle of Golden 
October. Winter is still far distant. It is a time 
for outdoor enjoyments and pleasure lingers in the 
open country. Get out your wheel for the final 
rides. The leaves fall, the presage of decay is vis- 
ible on every hand and all nature is preparing for 
the inevitable rest that comes with the fall of snow. 
The splendor of summer has been transformed into 
the russet of October. 



But we want to tell you about what we have been 
doing since our last issue. First in importance is 

THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY. 
We met in Boston at Hendrie's, on Talbot Ave- 
nue, and the first thing on the program was a fish 
dinner served as only Hendrie can serve it. First 
we had a fish chowder which agreeably tickled the 
palates of the New Yorkers. Then we had a Scrod 
of Haddock with Welsh Rabbit Sauce. A thing to 
make the gods chuckle. Don't spell- it "Schrod." 
Years gone by they used to take a fish called a 



114 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

"Scrod," which was of the Tom-Cod family, split it 
open and broil it. But the Tom Cods went out with 
Blue Point Oysters and Little Neck Clams and now 
they split a haddock, cook it after the same manner 
and call it a "Scrod." Then we had a big fish — we 
forget the name — which was split open and broiled. 
Very nice. After that we had certain conventional 
things which need not be mentioned. 



Now as to the meeting: — President Meserole 
presided. There were fifteen present, including four 
from New York, two from Rhode Island, one from 
Connecticut and one from Pennsylvania (Geo. T. 
Bush of Bellefonte). 

The Secretary reported a membership of 1,301. 
During the year past we have lost but 127 mem- 
bers, and of these 15 have been lost by death. Six 
life members have gone from us: Col. Albert A. 
Pope, Boston; Charles W. Pierce, Brighton; Mat- 
thew Gibb, New York; W. J. Breed, Cincinnati and 
two from Philadelphia, Harold R. Lewis and 
Thomas Hockley, who died some time ago, but just 
reported. 

In response to our request for subscriptions we 
received $168.50. This helped us over the dull days 
of winter when our income is small, but the amount 
is much smaller than the Executive Committee 
hoped for. The lists are not yet closed. 

The Auditor reported receipts $1,026.93 an ^ ex * 
penditures $1,003.20. Leaving a balance of $23.73 
on hand. 

Several amendments to the Constitution were made. The 
new Sections will now read as follows: 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 115 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 2. — The National Assembly shall consist of the 
President, Vice Presidents, Secretary-Treasurer and Au- 
ditor, the Representatives chosen as hereinafter provided, 
the Counsellor, and all ex-Presidents, ex-Vice Presidents, 
ex-Secretaries and ex-Treasurers of the League, who shall 
be members of the League in good standing. 

Section 6. — The annual meeting of the national assembly 
shall be held on such a day not earlier than August 20th 
and not later than September 20th in each year, and at 
such place as may be designated by the President. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. — The officers of the League shall be a Presi- 
dent, First and Second Vice Presidents, a Secretary-Treas- 
urer, and an Auditor, to be elected as hereinafter provided. 

Section 2. — Not later than April 1 in each year the Presi- 
dent shall appoint a Nominating Committee of three, 
which shall report, not later than June 1, a list of candi- 
dates for the elective offices. This list shall be published 
in the official organ of June 15. Any five members of the 
League may nominate additional candidates by filing a cer- 
tificate to that effect with the Secretary-Treasurer not later 
than July 1. All names placed in nomination shall be 
printed on a ballot and sent to each member of the As- 
sembly at the time of sending the official notification of the 
meeting. Each member shall express his preference by 
marking the ballot as per instructions thereupon, signing 
the same and sending it to the Secretary-Treasurer; pro- 
vided, however, that any member who attends the meeting 
may present his vote in person. The votes shall be can- 
vassed during the meeting of the Assembly by a special 
committee appointed by the President. The candidates 
having the highest number of votes shall be declared 
elected and shall take office at the close of the Annual 
Meeting. 

A nominating committee reported and recom- 
mended the following candidates for the several of- 
fices; the same to be submitted to a mail vote of the 
Assembly. 



116 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

President, Walter M. Meserole of Brooklyn, N. 
Y. (Present incumbent.) 

First Vice President, Fred Atwater, Bridgeport, 
Conn. (Advanced from Second Vice President.) 

Second Vice President, Quincy Kilby of Boston. 
. (New.) 

Secretary-Treasurer, Abbot Bassett of Boston. 
(Twenty-third year.) 

Auditor, George W. Nash, Abington, Mass. 
(Sixth term.) 

The Secretary-Treasurer was instructed to re- 
number the members during the coming fall and to 
renumber both groups of Life Members as one. 

The following Resolutions were passed: 

Resolved, That in the death of Colonel Albert A. Pope, 
the League of American Wheelmen has lost a loyal mem- 
ber, a good friend, and one who has been from the first an 
earnest advocate and a liberal supporter of the cause in 
which it is engaged. Colonel Pope was one of the found- 
ers of the League, has always been interested in its work 
and by his advice and liberal benefactions very many of its 
projects have been carried to a gratifying success. We rec- 
ognize his sterling integrity, his remarkable foresight and 
his ability to plan and carry out great undertakings. We 
tender to his family our heartfelt sympathy in this its hour 
of bereavement, and we hold in loving memory one whom 
we ever found a genial companion and a power of strength 
in the cause of cycling and its kindred interest, the im- 
provement of the public highways. 

Passed unanimously by a standing vote and the 
Secretary instructed to enter the same upon the 
records and send a copy to the family of the de- 
ceased. 

And then we adjourned sine die. 

Abbot Bassett, Secretary. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 117 

The next event of importance was the annual 
Wheel About the Hub, held by the Boston Bicycle 
Club September 4 and 5 with a lay-over on Labor 
Day, which was on the 6th. It never rains when the 
boys are on this trip, but it came very near it this 
time. When the party was well-housed and asleep 
the rain came down and it was a very dubious pros- 
pect that they looked upon the morning of the sec- 
ond day. But the storm king was kind and stopped 
the leak just at the time of starting forth. There 
was just rain enough to lay the dust and the cyclers 
say the roads were never in better condition for 
them. But, first of all, let us look at those who went 
and how they got there. 

On Bicycles — Walter G. Kendall, John B. Kelley, 
Edward F. Kelley, Joseph W. Swan, Theodore 
Rothe, J. Rush Green, Chas. C. Ryder, Elliot Cald- 
well, of Boston; John C. Gulick, James M. McGinley 
and Will R. Pitman from New York; Geo. L. Cook, 
Providence, R. I. 

In Automobiles — Frank W. Weston, Abbot Bas- 
sett, Quincy Kilby, Charles W. Reed, W. H. Ed- 
mands, Edward Burbeck, Herbert M. Butler, Frank 
D. Irish, Joseph A. Hendrie, Fred J. Stark of 
Boston; Charles J. Obermayer, Milo M. Belding, 
Jr., Fred G. Lee, F. W. Brooks, Jr., George B. 
Woodward, Kenneth Woodward, Frank P. Share, 
Xavier Z. Niess, Andrew J. Peters of New York; 
Elmer G. Whitney, Dover, N. H.; Fred Atwater, 
Bridgeport, Conn.; Thomas P. Himes, Eugene A. 
Hemmenway, W. D. Peck, Providence, R. I. 

The run started at 10 A. M., Friday. Many 



118 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

friends were at the start to see us off, and over the 
old familiar road we traveled once more. Eddie and 
Freddie and "We" and the other* baggage were in a 
big White steamer and we went at a pace that filled 
our hearts with joy. We were delegated to play the 
part of whipper in and to pick up all wounded and 
distressed riders of the wheel. This put us behind 
the bicycles and as the wheel goes so went we. It 
was a delightful "Ohne Hast." We didn't climb 
any fences nor knock over any telegraph poles; we 
saw all the scenery, and we were in no instance late 
to our meals. The many stops to wait for the wheel- 
men and "us" allowed for the taking of pictures. 

Lunch at the Grove of Pleasant Memories with 
Baked Beans, Roasts, Salads and Deep Apple Pie 
was as "gorge us" as usual. We climbed Blue Hill. 
Called at Cobb's. Banqueted at Tudor Farm Club. 
Kilby and Bassett read verses just as though having 
done it many years had made them used to it. There 
were many requests to publish but we think we had 
better not. Those who don't make verses think that 
those who do should print them, but those who do 
know well enough that verses put before a jolly 
company where chicken, ice cream and other things 
have circulated freely are not quite up to the mark 
of what should come to a man in cold type during 
his sober moments. Some of the party with painful 
recollections of sleepless nights On rock-bottom cots 
at Tudor Farm went over to the Sharon House and 
slept peacefully in good beds provided by an inter- 
esting landlady with whom the more susceptible 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 119 

were well pleased. They did not, however, escape 
the man who comes around' at 5 A. M. with a 
matutinal bracer of rum and milk. 

At the grove of P. M. there was a new event. The 
Captain called for a special photograph of the "old 
men," "because," said he, "we may not get another 
chance!" And so they put four persons, said to be 
"old men," on improvised seats in a position to be 
shot at by the picture maker. Then came a demand 
from the great crowd of youngsters that they be 
allowed to make a background. And they were in- 
dulged. And the five alleged "old men" answered 
to the names of Weston, Pitman, Reed, Woodward, 
Bassett, in the order of age. 

At Cedar Lodge was held the impressive service 
in memory of the departed. Charlie Reed gave the 
bugle calls and Mr. Brittan played taps on the cor- 
net and the usual toast was drunk. The unclean 
ones went in swimming in their birthday clothes and 
came out cleansed and purified. 

One of the party, delayed at Sharon, was in so 
much of a hurry to catch the main party that he 
fell into a trap at Hingham with the usual fine re- 
sults. 

Eddie and Freddie and "we" did the whipper in 
act the second day and we didn't go into any trap. 
There was a suggestion that we were blocking the 
road but we only smiled. 

There is so much in these things that cannot be 
written down that we despair telling the tale. The 
trip is a great big aggregation of pleasant experi- 
ences. Can one say more? The pleasure of these 



120 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

runs has never been marred by an accident. With 
so many wheels and so many autos this seems re- 
markable, yet everything about the affair is remark- 
able — the company, the route, the weather, the 
good cheer and the things which refresh the inner 
man. 



Did you know that Tuesday, the 19th, was Apple 
Day? Dating back to a movement started by the 
fruit associations at the St. Louis Fair, the third 
Tuesday in October is observed nationally as apple 
day, at which time those who are charitably inclined 
make presents of apples to various hospitals and 
charitable institutions. In addition everyone must 
eat at least one apple or a piece of apple pie. We 
think that, perhaps, a glass of cider will let one off 
with a satisfactory record. 



If Apple Day, why not Wheel Day, when every- 
one who ever rode a wheel should mount and ride 
as far as to him seems best? 



A lot of you will remember E. R. Drew who used 
to paint "Columbia Bicycles" on the scenery. He 
has been written up in "Everybody's" for October 
and it makes interesting reading. He is doing high 
art at present, but not so high in the air as he used 
to work. Drew's writings have been read all over 
the continent. 



We have had a few callers at the office since our 
last writing. Louis Debs from Buffalo dropped in 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 121 

for a minute's chat and George A. Gorgas from 
Harrisburg, Pa., looked us up. Bush of Bellefonte, 
Pa., came over to Boston to see if National Assem- 
blies were anything like those of old times. Not 
quite so large but very much more harmonious. ■ 

Harry Ellard of Cincinnati, a wheelman since 
1876, dropped in upon us and we had a very fine 
chat over the times that were. He is on the lecture 
circuit telling of cow-boy experiences and "Indians 
I have known," and giving a few verses from the 
portfolio of the "poet lariat." Ellard has irrrbibed 
the spirit of the plains and his greatest delight is in 
the open with a good wheel and a fine road under- 
neath him. 



Our old friend Stall (W. W.) is out and about. 
We told you last month of the serious accident that 
put him in the doctor's care, and now we are very 
glad to note his recovery. We called him up over 
the telephone September 21, and found that he was 
shaving himself. When a man can find time to at- 
tend to the conservation of his personal beauty it is 
quite time to dismiss the doctor. Stall is once more 
selling factories, wholesale or retail. 



Brother Belding of New York has made "our 
grand-daughter" a life member of the League. No 
doubt she is the youngest of us and will easily fit 
into the position of "Grand-daughter of the 
League." 



When the "flying bicycle" is really in use, as a 
French scientist says it some time will be, the own- 



122 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

ers of such machines may laugh at the "no riding on 
the sidewalks" ordinance. 



We are sorry to learn of the death of Hugh Mac- 
Lean, a bicycle rider known to fame. He was the 
motor-paced champion of America. Riding during 
training behind a pacing machine his bicycle hit the 
guard of the pacer and he was thrown, landing on 
his head, suffering a compound fracture of the skull. 
Died September 3. This makes the sixth victim 
killed while following motors: John Nelson, Archie 
McEachern, Harry Elks, George Leander, Louis 
Mettling, Hugh MacLean. Rather dangerous 
sport. 



Another old veteran gone into retirement. Elliott 
Mason, one of the founders of the L. A. W., and 
from the first with the Pope Manufacturing Co., has 
retired to private life. And now he will sit down, 
think of the past and cuddle his grand-children. We 
wish him joy, for we has well earned the leisure due 
middle age. We cannot call him old. We are more 
than glad that he is a free mason. 



That photograph of the "old men," taken at the 
W. A. T. H. should be interesting. Better have a 
copy. It may not be out of place to remark that the 
"old men" climb Blue Hill while the young fellows 
sprawl for rest at the base. 



We are taking in young blood. Haven't you a 
boy or a grand boy to put into a thing that gave 
you so much pleasure? No age limit. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 123 

The National Assembly is going to allow its mem- 
bers to participate in a real election. Heretofore 
the election rules were open to the charge that the 
rank and file merely ratified what had been already 
practically decided. 



Last month we passed a mystic date. Nineteen 
hundred and nine, ninth month of the year, ninth 
day of the month; did anything great and queer 
happen that date? 



They used to say that L. A. W. meant "Loaf all 
winter." Well, there is a little bit of truth in the 
saying except for those winters when we re-number, 
of which the coming winter is one; but then all sea- 
sons are good in which to "Look After Wrecruits." 



The Cycling Division of the New York Athletic 
Club is preparing for a very large dinner in Decem- 
ber. A lot of old-timers are expected. 



The return of Peary calls to our mind an episode 
of a long time ago which created quite a stir in the 
cycling world. John M. VerhoefT, of Louisville, 
Ky., a well-known wheelman and a life member of 
the L. A. W., enlisted with Peary for a trip to the 
frozen north. It was reported that he did not get 
along with Peary, and one day with dogs and 
sledges he set out for a push to the pole on his own 
account. Peary sailed away and left him, so the 
reports said, and he was never heard from after- 
wards. His friends in Kentucky blamed Peary for 
what they called a heartless desertion. They had an 



124 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

abounding faith in Verhoeff and they strongly urged 
keeping his name on our roll, for, said they, "He is 
a man of tremendous energy and perseverance and 
we believe he will push through to somewhere.' , 
VerhoefFs sister met Peary as he landed and cried 
out to him: "Where is my brother?" But she got 
no answer. The people of Louisville cannot be 
made to believe that Peary was altogether right and 
at the time they had many sympathizers in the wheel 
world. 



Our Periodical Department is in full swing. It is 
the present policy of publishers to< forbid discounts 
unless they go to those who are in a club. We 
nearly always have clubs under way and we can ac- 
commodate anyone of our patrons to discounts as 
low as the lowest by putting them into clubs. Send 
in lists and we will give figures. Our standing ad- 
vertisement tells how to form clubs. 



Sunday, September 12, the Century Road Club of 
America conducted a Pleasure Run to Rye Beach, 
N. Y. Four hundred riders participated. There 
were four divisions and a ladies' division. Forty- 
one organizations participated. The Courier Cycle 
Club won a cup offered for the neatest uniform ap- 
pearance, and the Columbia Road Club of Jersey 
City took the prize for an out-of-town club with the 
largest number of riders. At the beach there was 
boating, fishing and bathing and a few races, includ- 
ing a coasting contest. 



The ex-officer's list of the National Assembly has 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 125 

been extended by admitting all ex-Secretaries and 
ex-Treasurers. They used to call it "Royalty;" no 
wonder, for it contains those who have been se- 
lected in the past for particular fitness to conduct 
League affairs, and who still remain with us. It is 
a good wagon to climb into for it holds a lot of good 
people. 

Bishop Hall has said, "Moderation is the silken 
string running through the pearl chain of all vir- 
tues," and Euripides declares, "Moderation, the 
noblest gift of Heaven." Certain it is that in noth- 
ing else does moderation count for so much as in 
bicycling. A lack of it is the source of nearly every 
distress that has ever been charged against -the 
bicycle. If wheelmen had been content with a lower 
gear, not so many would have given up riding. 

COUNSELLOR. 
I have this day appointed Mr. John C. Gulick of New 
York City as Counsellor of the League of American 
Wheelmen, the appointment to take effect on the receipt 
by you of his acceptance and is to continue until the expi- 
ration of my term in office on Jan. i, 1910, or until his suc- 
cessor shall qualify. 

Walter M. Meserole, President. 
Brooklyn, Sept. 13, 1909. 



JOINED IN 1892. 
A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1892 and are still in good standing. 

846 — Grant Green, Louisville, Ky., Feb. 12. 

847— F. D. Fairbanks, Mansfield, Mass., Feb. 12. 

848 — Clarence McKay Lewis, New York City, Feb. 12. 

850— A. W. Schober, Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 26. 

852— Albert Young, Kansas City, Mo., March 18. 

8S5— John R. Heard, Boston, Mass., April 1. 

856 — Edwin E. Schneider, Philippines, April 1. 



126 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

857— Mrs. John A. Pallister, Ottumwa, la., April 1. 
860 — Mrs. Lincoln Holland, Los Angeles, Cal., April 8. 
861— G. G. Brinckerhoff, New York City, April 8. 
863— A. B. Ingerson, Worcester, Mass.,, April 15. 
864— Dana F. Fellows, Franklin, N. H., April 15. 
865— W. H. Jordan, Hopedale, Mass., April 15. 
868— N. G. Stanley, Boston, Mass., April 15. 
869— Louis Debo, Buffalo, N. Y., April 22. 
870— W. T. Colbron, New York City, April 22. 
871 — George S. Cullen, Philadelphia, Pa., April 22. 
877 H. O. E. Ernst, Philadelphia, Pa., April 29. 
879— Thos. J. Southard, Richmond, Me., April 29. 
883— George E. Briggs, Peekskill, N. Y., May 6. 
884— Frank Wessels, Peekskill, N. Y., May 6. 
886— Isaiah V. Peppitt, Philadelphia, Pa., May 6. 
887— H. B. Luckenbach, Bethlehem, Pa., May 6. 
888 — Louis Pierron, Milwaukee, Wis., May 6. 
890 — Dan J. Chisholm, Boston, Mass., May 6. 
893 — Anna M. Young, New York City, May 13. 
894— Elliott Smith, New Rochelle, N. Y., May 13. 
895 — Prof. Elias H. Johnson, Chester, Pa., May 13. 
897 — Alfred L. Simmons, Dorchester, Mass., May 20. 
898 — James H. Rees, Minneapolis, Minn., May 20. 
899— J. Mont Tillman, Elmira, N. Y., May 20. 
900 — Elmore F. Austin, New York City, May 20. 
901 — J. P. Brennan, Providence, R. I., May 20. 
903 — F. J. Wenz, St. Joseph, Mo., May 27. 
905— Wtti. H. Bodine, Flemington, N. J. 
906— Chas. Fred Travis, Brighton, Mass., June 3. 
908 — J. W. Mclnness, New York City, June 3. 
909 — A. D. Knapp, Edgewood Park, Pa., June 3. 
910 — John E. Doughty, Philadelphia, Pa., June 3. 
913 — A. S. Johnson, Boston, Mass., June 10. 
916 — M. C. Ayres, Tottenville, N. Y., June 10. 
918 — D. M. Shepley, Sheldon Springs, Vt., June 10. 
919 — Eugene E. Stevens, Washington, D. C, June 10. 
920 — James Lehan, Stoughton, Mass., June 17. 
922 — Thomas D. Plimpton, Walpole, Mass., June 24. 
923 — Douglas Henry, New York City, June 24. 
926 — C. H. Raguet, Marshall, Tex., June 24. 
927— Ro<bt. H. Carr, Baltimore, Md., July 1. 
929 — Walter S. Irwin, Plymouth, Mass., July 8. 
930— John Gregory, Roselle, N.' J., July 8. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 127 

934— Philip J. Vetter, Scranton, Pa., July 8. 

935 — F. R. Goodman, Chicago, 111., July 15. 

936 — John Berling, Detroit, Mich., July 15. 

939 — Wm. H. Graser, Troy, N. Y., July 22. 

940— J. M. Keffer, Philadelphia, Pa., July 22. 

941 — Augustus A. Day, Riverton, N. J., July 29. 

942 — James Armstrong, Jr., Greensburg, Pa., July 29. 

944 — Alfred E. Wellington, East Boston, Mass., Aug. 5. 

947 — H. F. Burlingame, Howard, R. I., Aug. 5. 

948— C. Will Gray, Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 12. 

951 — C. L. Bryant, Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 19. 

952 — Geo. L. McCarthy, New York City, Aug. 26. 

954 — Thos. R. Craig, Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 26. 

955 — John H. Barrett, Providence, R. I., Aug. 26. 

955a — L. P. Coleman, New York City, Sept. 2. 

957 — George Mayr, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 16. 

958— Chas. W. Houston, Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 16. 

959 — T. J. Keenan, Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 16. 

960 — Sanford A. Potter, Providence, R. I., Sept. 16. 

962 — W. Mackenzie, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 23. 

963 — Joseph Oatman, New York City, Sept. 30. 

966 — W. Austin Amory, Chicago, 111., Oct. 14. 

967 — Wm. Short, Louisville, Ky., Oct. 14. 

968— J. Bohne, New York City, Oct. 14. 

970 — Harry R. Keen, Lansdowne, Pa., Oct. 21. 

971 — A. Segin, Memphis, Tenn., Oct. 28. 

972 — A. C. Bingham, Marysville, Cal., Nov. 4. S 

975 — James M. Pickens, Washington, D. C, Nov. 4. 

976 — Henry C. Morse, Peoria, 111., Nov. 11. 

976a — Mrs. J. B. Kaercher, Pittsburg, Pa., Nov. 11. 

978 — F. P. McCormick, Taunton, Mass., Nov. 25. 

970— B. F. Wells, Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 25. 

980 — A. Lee Wager, Rhinebeck, N. Y., Nov. 25. 

982— Mrs. C. P. Buchanan, Pittsburg, Pa., Dec. 9. 

983— W. M. Glenn, Tribune, Kan., Dec. 16. 

984 — Herbert H. Rice, Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 16. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS TO OUR FUND. 

George L. Cooke of Providence, R. I., sends five mem- 
bers and agrees to keep them in good standing for five 
years. 

Milo M. Belding, Jr., pays for a life membership for 
Ruth Turner Lapham, aged nine months. 



PERIODICAL LIST. 

We publish a list of such periodicals as will allow a dis- 
count to subscribers. Many magazines will not allow the 
list price to be cut. All such we do not schedule. Others 
will not allow price to be cut on a single subscription but 
will give a large discount when a club is formed. Note 
that many of the Periodicals below are designated by a 
letter or by Roman numerals. 

To form a club — Figure Class A at 65 cents; Class B at 
$1.35; Class C at 35 cents. The Roman numerals represent 
25 cents for each figure (VII means $1.75). If the club 
calls for three magazines add 35 cents to combined price. 
That is our profit. If four or more magazines, add 10 
cents for each magazine for our profit. 

Many of the Magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 

The first column gives list price; the second column, our 
price. 

Ainslee ..B 1.80 1.80 

American Boy A 1.00 1.00 

American Business Man VII 2.00 2.00 

American Machinist Weekly 4.00 3.80 

American Magazine A 1.00 1.00 

American Photography 1.50 1.35 

Appleton's IV 1.50 1.50 

Atlantic 4-00 3.4S 

Automobile IX 3.00 3.00 

Automobile Topics 2.00 1.75 

Baseball Magazine IV 1.50 1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Bohemian IV 1.50 1.50 

Bookman IX 2.50 2.50 

Book News Monthly Ill 1.00 .90 

Boston Cooking School A 1.00 1.00 

Burr Mcintosh VIII 3.00 3.00 

Busy Man's Magazine V 2.00 2.00 

Camera 1.00 .90 

Camera Craft A 1.00 .90 

Century 4-0O 3.85 

Children's Magazine (Mrs. Burnett) A 1.00 1.00 



B«SSett'S SC»P Bool* 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :— #1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 9 NOVEMBER, 1909 5 Cents 



POETRY AND POULTRY. 
Once again the time has come round when we can aptly 
quote this fine Tennysonian outburst: 
The turkey stalks 
Along the walks 
And gayly gobbles in his glory. 
He little knows 
That by his toes 
He'll soon be hanging, limp and gory. 

Also this charming Swinburnian gem: 

Heaps of doughnuts, 
Piles of pies, 
Like a mountain 
Skyward rise, 
Turkeys tremble 
Through the land, 
For Thanksgiving 
Is at hand. 



COME INSIDE, OH YOU TURKEY. 
Here we are again! right in the middle of the 
eleventh month and close to the open door of 
winter. Everything is falling except prices. We 
hope you did not fail to "Remember the 5th of 
November, gunpowder, treason and plot." Guy 
Fawkes tried to blow up parliament from the cellar. 
Today the suffragette blows it up from the gallery. 



130 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Do you remember the old proverb: "In the mid- 
dle toots the ibis"? We have changed that for now 
in the middle toots the turkey with his decoration 
of cranberry sauce, for the day of feasting draweth 
nigh, and scores of turkeys soon must die; get one 
that's young and sweet and fat, and stuff it full of 
this and that; revive the joys of youthful days, and 
for thy blessings offer praise. 

November is the great month for meteors. What 
can be more pleasant than looking for meteors if the 
young lady is pretty and pleasant? We are speaking 
from memory and not from anticipation. 

Did it ever occur to you what a wealth of posses- 
sions one can claim if he but owns a tract of land? 
His claim goes straight downward to the interior 
conflagration and straight upward to the stars. 
Lawyers are now discussing the rights of flying ma- 
chines. The old Roman law gives a man absolute 
ownership of the air above his land. As matters 
stand, there having been no changes in the law for 
several hundred years, a man in a flying machine has 
no rights that a man with a plough is bound to 
respect. The question is how best to bring the atten- 
tion of the judicial system to this unfair discrimina- 
tion against the flying portion of the race. No man 
can fly as things now stand without technically 
breaking the law, unless he gets special privileges 
from the land owners. Why not forbid a man 
breathing the air that is above our land as well as 
forbid him to take fruit that grows upon it? We 
don't much care for our possessions downward. 



B>LSSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 131 

ARTICLE III. 

THE ROAD-HOG AND THE TURNIP FLEA. 

(According to the "Mark Lane Express," the dust stirred 

up by motor traffic falls over the hedges upon the turnip 

crops, and saves them from the ravages of the turnip flea.) 

The road-hog kills the turnip flea, 
And saves that tasty root for me. 
For neck of mutton, gently boiled, 
When turnip-less is wholly spoiled. 
And so it will not be denied 
The road-hog's pace is justified. 

As motor cars and cycles pass, 

The flea ejaculates, "Alas! 

Will no one save our little lives, 

Our friends, our children, and our wives? 

Police traps — where are they?" they cry, 

Then, choking, drowned in dust, they die. 

Thus ravages from blight are quelled 

By locomotion self-propelled 

And every car that hums and hoots 

Preserves intact a dozen roots. 

And every bike that whirrs and pops 

Secures a dish of turnip tops. 

—Pall Mall Gazette. 



In the late census taken by the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission it was found that forty-two 
per cent, of vehicles using the roads of Massachu- 
setts are horseless, but the horse refuses to go. 



The steam railroad ruined the business of the 
stage coaches and of freight hauling by wagon. The 
trolley, the bicycle and the automobile each has been 
a factor in displacing the horse. Yet, today, horses 
bring a higher price in the market than they ever 
did before. The horse maintains as close a relation- 
ship with humanity as ever. He is not displaced on 



132 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

the farm, though mechanical appliances for the 
farmer's aid multiply. Heavy auto trucks are gain- 
ing in popularity, but no one is prepared to state 
positively that fewer horses are used for hauling 
purposes. 

It may be that the horse is passing out of his fear- 
ful slavery. He is treated better than he used to be. 
Lighter burdens are put upon him and the laws of 
communities see that he is not misused. In a 
gentler age the horse may be only a family pet, his 
work a parade and exercise. 

Uncle Ezra says: "The auty mobile won't never 
put the hoss out uv bizniz onless it hap'ns to ketch 
the hoss where he can't dodge." 



In a thousand years, according to a medical 
expert, our feet will have turned to hoofs. O, 
blessed dream of a cornless and bunionless era! But 
then, how about a pedal to fit them? 



Another life member taken froim the roll. Pro- 
fessor Elias H. Johnson, Chester, Pa., life member 
No. 56, died Malrch 10, 1906. 



The president of the carriage-builders' national 
association, who says that the carriage builders must 
now build automobiles or else go out of business, 
deplores the fact that people who a few years ago 
tried to save $100 or $200 on the purchase of a horse- 
drawn vehicle, now cheerfully give up $6,000 for an 
automobile. It must be because they have found out 
what a useful and delightful vehicle the automo- 
bile is. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 133 

According to the French revenue returns for 1908, 
which have just been issued, there were 2,224,594 
bicycles in use in that country. 



J. Rush Green, last month, invited the Boston boys 
to his summer place at Annisquam, there to give 
Quincy Kilby a welcome home. It was done in true 
Boston style, for the menu had for its central dish 
baked beans and brown bread. Kilby said he had 
seen nor eaten anything so good abroad, and the 
company, not one of whom had ever been abroad, 
made it unanimous by a standing vote. 



We had something to say last month about Elliott 
Mason taking a rest. He has camped down at West- 
field, N. J. We can imagine that he has set up a 
vine and fig tree under the shadow of which he will 
find his dolce far niente. Let him not be disturbed. 



The new Pope bicycle will have a spring fork. 



The bean microbe is the latest, but it looks like a 
deep, dark plot against Boston's sacred dish. 



Bibamus! Jewahdiddle. What is Jewahdiddle? 
you ask. It is an old time drink that fascinated men 
and women alike in the 17th century. Here is the 
way to make it: A pint of table beer, a tablespoon- 
ful of brandy, a teaspoonful of brown sugar or clari- 
fied syrup, a little ginger and a thin slice of lemon. 
This compound may seem insipid to the imbiber of 
Manhattans and Martinis, but 300 years ago it 
pleased belles and beaux, who called it "a right gos- 
sip's cup," and were gently stimulated thereby. 



134 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

What does Mr. Barkeep say of "Jewahdiddle" today? 
Stuff. 



The new comparison: Nominative, grandpa's 
stables; comparative, pa's garage; superlative, son's 
landing stage. That is the way the world travels 
onward and upward. 



Some poor dweller in the benighted beyond of 
Chicago asks what a real New England pie is like? 
It probably will not help him to be told, but if he 
means apple, it is like an essay by Emerson liquefied 
with the music of Massenet and spiced with the 
cynicism of Shaw; if he means pumpkin, it is like 
some of Gounod's music heard in a landscape all sun 
and flowers. It is too early yet to describe the mince 
pies of 1909, but last year's — and last year was not 
an extraordinarily good year — were like an increase 
in salary and a present from home arriving on the 
day when one's conscience was behaving itself. 
Eden had no glory that a New England pie would 
have given it. 



The tire business seems to be very good. The 
Diamond Rubber Co. of Akron has declared a 100 
per cent, stock dividend, and a cash dividend of 10 
per cent. This puts the capitalization at ten million 
dollars. 



The six-day race is down for Dec. 6 to 11 at Mad- 
ison Square Garden, N. Y. Preliminary race meet 
on Saturday, Dec. 4. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 135 

Wonder if the "Cook Book" will have a recipe for 
the cure of Pearytonitis? Speaking of the Pole, ap- 
plicants for the "Oh, Shut Up Club" are on the 
increase. 



Doctor W. D. Kempton, who used to stop pulling 
teeth in Cincinnati in order to ride his wheel, is 
working eastward and has now taken up his abiding 
place in New York City. The old place won't seem 
quite the same without the genial doctor, but we 
feel sure he will brighten up New York a bit. 



Club life evidently is not languishing in Great 
Britain. According to the last report of the Na- 
tional Cyclists' Union there are no less than 1,999 
clubs affiliated with that organization. 



God's true gospel is that sung by the birds, blos- 
somed by the flowers, and sparkled by the stars. 
Man is the only heretic. 



There is a growing demand for the bicycle, not- 
withstanding the increase of the automobile's popu- 
larity and the rapid perfection of the flying machine, 
and the demand comes chiefly from those who can 
use it in a practical way. — Christian Science Monitor. 

That's just the trouble. The utilitarian has come 
in and driven out the glory. We who rode for fun 
and exercise, now feel about as the man does who 
sees in a dray the steed that was once his favorite 
driving horse. The bicycle will always have a place 
in the world, but isn't it sometimes distressing to see 
our early love doing work in the kitchen? 



136 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Friends of the late Colonel Pope are rejoiced to 
note so good a showing by his estate. Robert L. 
Winkley, the conservator of the property, has filed 
in the Probate Court a statement showing a total 
amount of $826,712.77. Not very large for a man 
who once had an income of a million a year and a 
fortune of $15,000,000, but very much more than 
many people thought, and all of us are glad that the 
bufferings of ill fortune were not so bad, after all. 



Did you ever give away something very nice as a 
wedding or a Christmas gift and say to yourself: "I 
wish I could afford to have one just like it"? If the 
liberally minded men could recall all that they had 
given away what a fortune would come to them — 
and what a failure would life be to them. Carnegie 
was about right when he said: "To die rich is a 
disgrace." 



Don't you remember a common remark by the 
unconverted in the old days: "I'd rather saw wood 
than ride a wheel"? But we never caught them with 
the buck saw. Now coimes the Rev. Frank Crane, 
of Chicago, who says there is more fun in laying 
bricks than in playing golf. Let's all gather 'round 
when he gets to work. 



A British medical investigator advances the theory 
that high speeding checks the tuberculosis germ in 
chauffeurs. It is, however, also conducive to sudden 
deaths for the intersecting part of the population. 



Travel is being made easy. Just look at the 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 137 

advance in a hundred years. In 1809 the people 
traveled: 

On foot. 

On horses. 

In horse-drawn vehicles. 

In canal boats pulled by horses or mules. 

In steamboats at five miles an hour. 

In sailing vessels and rowboats. 

In 1909 we travel: 

On foot. 

On roller skates. 

On horses. 

In horse-drawn vehicles. 

On bicycles 63 miles an hour. 

On motorcycles. 

In gasoline-driven automobiles. 

In electric-driven automobiles. 

In trolley cars. 

In electric cars above and below the earth. 

In steam railroad ca'rs. 

In steamboats at 25 miles an hour. 

In motor boats at 40 miles an hour. 

In gasoline and electric launches. 

In airships. 

In aeroplanes. 

In 2009 we shall travel — but wait a minute! We 
won't be here and we don't know nor caire how they 
travel. 



A cycle tire may be both old and pneu. 



The bicycle is going some. Time was when one 



138 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

applauded Cortis, who rode twenty miles in the hour. 
Now we have a record of 63 miles, or more than a 
mile a minute. Paul Guignard at Munich on Sept. 
15 behind a motor pacemaker rode 63 miles, 189.8 
yards in 60 minutes. His speed was at the rate of 
92.5 feet per second. His average time for the hour 
was 57 seconds per mile. The feat was accomplished 
on a cement track where, last year, Albert Edward 
Wills rode 61 miles, 904 yards in one hour. This 
was the best previous record. Previously Guignard 
had made 59 miles, 86 yards. Where is the end? 



Polls close far the election of officers today. Did 
you vote? 



English cyclists are trying to locate the geograph- 
ical centre of England. The bull ring at Birming- 
ham is claimed for the exact spot. A correspondent 
of the C. T. C. Gazette writes : 

"My grandmother, who was born in Birmingham 
in 1805, told me that in her young days there existed 
near St. Martin's Church in that city, two small 
streams running side by side in opposite directions; 
one of these carried its waters into the Tame, and 
thence into the Trent and the Humber, while the 
other flowed by way of the Avon and the Severn 
into the Bristol Channel. If this be true, then the 
narrow bank between the two brooklets must be 
geographically England's centre." 

Here is a chance for Cook and Peary to have an 
Eskimoless search. 



Don't you remember that in the old days wheel- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 139 

men used to cycle from Land's End to John 
O'Groat's? Why not send a wheelman to the land's 
end in the frozen north? We think he would get 
there and not talk so much about it. 



Wm. Wunsch of Allegheny, writes: — 
"I have rounded, July 31st, 82 years, enjoying 
fairly good health, and my rides on the wheel, which 
are only marred by the reckless driving of automo- 
biles on the road as well as in the city. Especially 
when rounding the street corners, leaving you in 
doubt and fear whether they will ride you down or 
observe the laws of the road, of which, to my mind 
of thinking, most of them are ignorant and careless. 
"I reglret never having had an opportunity to 
grasp the hand of a man that helped do so much 
good for every rider of the wheel and the League in 
particular." 



Quite an idea to enroll members over eighty. Will 
those of our members who are four score and still 
riding report to us for enrollment? 



The Suffragettes hope to ride into power on the 
bicycle. They have placed an order for a number of 
specially distinguished looking mounts. The ma- 
chines are finished in combinations of the union col- 
ors, which are purple, green and white, the violet 
and lily of the valley effect being heightened and the 
machines rendered even more striking by reason of 
the union emblem conspicuously painted on the gear 
cases. This is a huge trademark or sign upon which 
is embroidered the persistent and conspicuous 



140 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

motto: "Votes for Women." In the old days, men 
used to follow the woman awheel. Will they do so 
now? 



At the Good Roads convention at Yorktown, Oct. 
ig, Congressman J. Hampton Moore of Pennsyl- 
vania said: "With good roads and improved water- 
ways in the United States the revolutionary war 
could not have lasted eight years. Gen. Washing- 
ton/' he said, "had insisted that free and easy com- 
mercial intercourse between the Atlantic seaboard 
and the amazing territory to the westward of us was 
the best, if not the only, cement that ,could bind the 
colonial states upon a permanent basis." 

With the L. A. W. in existence in 1770 they would 
have had good roads. Let's make our claim both 
long and wide. 



In treating things bicycular 
We try to be particular, 

And write just so 

For wheelmen know 
When facts aren't perpendicular. 

And so in style versicular 
We treat of things vehicular, 
Although at times 
To write these rhymes 
Is really not picnicular. 



Here's to good fellows' on good roads, 
And may their tribe increase; 

Their "ways are ways of pleasantness 
And all their paths are peace." 



That favored of mortals with "gumption" enough 

The pole of the noithland to seek, 
When that prize he has found will be nice to have 'round 

To help locate a bicycle squeak. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 141 

JOINED IN 1893. 
A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1893 and are still in good standing. 

986 — Owen Lawson, Louisville, Ky., Jan. 13. 

987— Charles J. Sander, Brookline, Mass., Jan, 13. 

989— Wm. D. Cotton, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 20. 

991 — Wm. Cramer, Rhinebeck, N. Y., Jan. 27. 

992 — W. D. Tillinghast, San Francisco, Cal., Feb. 3. 

995 — Geo. E. Deacon, Philadelphia, Pa., March 3. 

997 — Edwin G. Mclnness, Boston, Mass., March 10. 
1002— A. E. M. Spiller, Medford, Mass., April 7. 
1003 — James Smith, Providence, R. I., April 7. 
1006 — Fred. L. Beddows, Manchester, N. H., April 14. 
1008— A. P. Black, Brooklyn, N. Y., April 14. 
1010 — Paul Butler, Lowell, Mass., April 21. 
ion — Edwin Haas, Put in Bay, O., April 21. 
1012— M. R. Brock, St. Paul, Minn., April 28. 
1013 — Byron G. Morgan, Melrose, Mass., April 28. 
1015 — Harry R. Allen, Merrill, Wis., April 28. 
1017 — L. M. Frailey, Merchantville, N. J., May 5. 
1018 — J. L. Johnson, Fitchburg, Mass., May 5. 
1020 — H. M. Ayres, Upper Montclair, N. J., May 5. 
1023 — E. Earle Forrer, Dayton, O., May 5. 
1024 — Chas. F. Williams, Cincinnati, O., May 5. 
1026 — R. G. Hall, Jr., Sherman, Texas, May 5. 
1029 — Ira P. Carnes, Lima, O., May 12. 
1030 — Dr. Wm. S. Cook, Beaver Falls, Pa., May 12. 
1031 — James Ward, Pascoag, R. I., May 12. 
1035 — G. Richmond Parsons, Providence, R. I., May 26. 
1036 — James G. Mallon, Harrodsburg, Ky., June 2. 
1039 — Caleb Barker, New York City, June 2. 
1040 — J. W. Marquardt, Huntingdon, Pa., June 2. 
1042 — H. E. Strout, Boston, Mass., June 9. 
1043 — Alfred R. Kimball, New York City, June 9. 
1044 — Albion W. Shaw, Maiden, Mass., June 2$. 
1046 — H. O. Folger, Waterford, N. Y., June 23. 
1047 — John T. Loomis, Philadelphia, Pa., June 23. 
1049 — Fred W. Baldwin, South Weymouth, Mass., June 30. 
1050 — H. G. Coffin, Sausalito, Cal., June 30. 
1051 — John F. Brown, Philadelphia, Pa., June 30. 
1052 — W. L. Boswell, Philadelphia, Pa., June 30. 
1055 — C. G. Gribble, Manning, Texas, July 7. 
1056 — Charles W. Locke, Salem, Mass., July 14. 



142 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

1057— A. B. Reading, Flemington, N. J., July 14. 
1058 — G. B. Wirgman, East Orange, N. J., July 14. 
1062 — Ch'as. E. Libbey, New Haven, Conn., July 28. 
1063— W. W. Safford, Newport, N. H., July 28. 
1065— R. D. Webster, Elmira, N. Y., Aug. 4. 
1066 — Dr. J. L. Bower, Reading, Pa., Aug. 4. 
1067— H. W. Ott, New York City, Aug. 11. 
1068 — Charles Palmer, Chester, Pa., Aug. 11. 
1069 — A. L. Browne, West Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 18. 
1072— C. E. Wells, Sag Harbor, N. Y., Sept. 15. 
1074— Robert T. Kingsbury, Keene, N. H., Sept. 22. 
1075— H. M. Young, Manchester, N. H., Sept. 22. 
1076 — C. J. Obermayer, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 22. 
1077— H. H. W'atkins, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 22. 
1079 — C. W. King, Chicopee Falls, Mass., Sept. 29. 
1081 — R. F. Clay, Holmesburg, Pa., Oct. 13. 
1083— Dr. H. G. Piffard, New York City, Oct. 20. 
1084 — Wm. Ray Goodwin, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 20. 
1085 — Eugene J. Haiss, Albany, N. Y., Oct. 27. 
1086— John D. Chism, Jr., Albany, N. Y., Nov. 3. 
1087 — C. E. Scriven, Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 3. 
1088 — Elmer E. Jones, Norristown, Pa., Nov. 3. 
1089 — W. S. Reazor, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 17. 
1090 — G. H. Hitchcock, New York City, Dec. 1. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft , 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1,50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National , 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1. 00 14 

Woman's Home Companion . 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century 4.00 3.85 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 







IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it — IEEE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTER FOB 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Bassett'S Scrap BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OP THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 



a magazine mai is reaa irom cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicyles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :— §1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 81.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 

Mass.. under the Act of Cou-ress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 7. No. 10 DECEMBER, igog 5 Cents 



CHRISTMAS'S OUT O' SIGHT. 

I use to think 'at Fourth July's the bulliest time uv year, 
Fer all us kids 'ud do our best to have a time, an' skeer 
The life out uv old maids an' hosses with our noise, 
An' Gran'ma'd laff an' say, "Well, let the boys be boys," 
But one Fourth we had a 'xplosion an' I was sick all night — 
Fourth July's purty good, but Christmas's out o' sight! 

Thanksgivin' Day I'm right in line, only I have to wait, 
'Till Uncle asks a blessin', before I pass my plate, 
An' Pa sez, real sollum-like, but kind-a winks an eye, 
'At the boy 'at eats most turkey, can have the mostest pie. 
An' so I just pitch in, fer pie is my delight — 
Thanksgivin's purty good, but Christmas's out o' sight! 

'Long about November, I alius make a rule 

To be very prompt and reg'lar in attendin' Sunday school, 

I learn the Scriptur' lesson, also the "golden tex'," 

An' alius answer right up 'ithout her sayin' "nex'." 

Fer teacher's very lib'ral when a feller's actin' right — 

Sunday school's purty good, but Christmas's out o' sight. 

Us boys, we carry evergreens fer teacher, so 'at she 

Can tack 'em on the platform where the tree's a-goin' to be. 

And the bang-up celebrashun we have on Christmas Eve 

With music an' recitin' is more'n you could believe! 

Last year I got a pair uv skates, an' a sled all painted 

bright — 
Holler days are purty good, but Christmas's out o' sight! 



146 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

"CHRISTMAS COMES BUT ONCE A YEAR." 
The only festal day that is recognized by all 
Christendom. 



If the sun shines through the apple tree on Christ- 
mas day there will be an abundant crop in the fol- 
lowing year. 



In slavery days in Virginia the negroes had holi- 
day so long as the Yule-log continued to smoulder. 
They sometimes secured three days, if the log was 
old and tough. 



When a man's carving his trouble begins. 



It is good sometimes to reflect that Christmas 
comes but once a year; but it is, if anything, pleas- 
anter to think that the day after Christmas Day also 
comes but once a year. 



When you read this paragraph the members will 
have been given each a new number. The annuals 
will get their new rating upon renewal. Life mem- 
bers may have a new ticket with new annual and life 
numbers if they will send a stamped envelope ad- 
dressed for the return of same. Everyone will have 
a low number this time. 



As well be out of the world as out of fashion. 
That's why we are making this a Christmas num- 
ber. It takes no more than a story and a poem to 
do it and this we have supplied. In the days when 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 147 

wheels are not moving we must talk about some- 
thing else. That's what we are doing. 



Our annual election did not make a ripple on the 
surface of things. It's because we put up good 
people to throw ballots at. 



We enter a new decade with the opening year. 
We entered the last decade with a membership of 
50,378. Thomas J. Keenan was President, followed 
in February by Conway W. Sams, Elliott was run- 
ning a monthly magazine as official organ, and a 
weekly supplement carried the official notices. We 
went to Milwaukee for our annual meet. The past 
is ours; they cannot take it away; we are going to 
make the present a good past to look back upon. 



Geo. T. Bush, our old friend from Bellefonte, Pa., 
starts on a trip around the world next month. Not 
on a bicycle for, although it used to, a good wheel 
no longer grows on that kind of a bush. 



Ex-President Earle helps "the cause" with a V. 
and tells us to do what we please with it. We sha'n't 
sit up nights to find out what shall be done with it. 



President Meserole seconds the motion of Mr. 
Belding and crowns with the halo of life membership, 
a grandson. Unlike Mr. Belding, however, he se- 
lected his own grandson, and Irving Meserole King, 
aged 2 1/2 years, of Brooklyn, New York, is life 
member 309 (new numbering). There is room for 
more on the roll and it matters not if it be one's 
own grandchild, or another fellow's. 



148 BASSETT'S SCRAP BQOK ... 

THE MAN WITH A MASK. 
Our Christmas Story. 

"Is your father at home, kid?" 

He was not altogether an unpleasant-looking man 
who addressed the question to a fair-haired child, 
playing alone on the lawn of a suburban villa, in 
spite of his tattered garments. 

The little girl stopped playing, frowned prettily, 
and answered: 

"My name's Muriel, not Kid; and my papa never 
gets home till long after I've gone to bed. What's 
your name?" 

The hulking fellow averted his eyes, and answered 
her question by asking another. 

"Who else lives with you?" 

"Oh, only my little brother — you haven't seen 
him, have you? — my mamma and Mary. Mary's the 
servant, you know!" 

"Good-day, young 'un," said the tramp, as he 
ambled away. 

"Muriel, I'm called!" she shouted after him. 
"Will you come again?" 

"Thank 'e, I reckon I will!" he answered. 
***** 

"Oh, wait a minute, papa, I'm so sleepy!" 
Muriel knelt up in her little bed, rubbed her eyes, 
and shook her golden curls out. It was midnight. 
Having completely recovered from dreamland, she 
looked at the tall figure beside her bed, and gasped 
with delight when she realized that her long cher- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 149 

ished desire was going to be carried out. Papa had 
often promised to play at burglars with her, and 
there he was, quite ready, with a black mask cover- 
ing his eyes, and a little lantern that only gave a 
wee light. 

"Oh, papa," she cried, "you do look a funny 
burglar? We'll take ma's jewelry first. Won't she 
be surprised?" 

The midnight intruder nodded. 

"Where does ma keep it, Muriel?" he asked. 
"Burglars don't know where things are, you know. 
That's half the fun of it— eh?" 

"Oh, you are funny, papa! Let's whisper softer. 
It's on the dressing-table, in one of the little drawers. 
S-s-sh!" 

Muriel felt herself lifted shoulder high. 

"Now, then, ki Muriel," he whispered, "When 

we pass your mamma's room, ki Muriel, you 

just point to it, and keep as quiet as a mouse. That's 
the proper way, isn't?" 

She nodded delightedly, and did as he wished. 

"Where are you going now?" she asked almost 
inaudibly, as she was being carried downstairs. 

"Why, somebody must keep watch. Don't you 
know that one burglar takes the things while an- 
other keeps watch?" 

He carried her down into the cellar. It was very 
dark and cold, but Muriel said she wasn't afraid, 
because they were only playing burglars. 

"Now, then, ki Muriel," he whispered, "you 

keep watch, and don't make a noise." He slipped 
into her tiny hand one small bar of chocolate. 



150 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

"That's your share of the swag," he said and disap- 
peared. 

Muriel giggled when she thought of mamma's sur- 
prise. She listened a long time for return footsteps, 
and wondered, after all, if papa had been caught. 
She was not at all comfortable, nor was she warm; 
and a few minutes later her pretty eyes closed, her 
head dropped, and she drifted into dreamland. Then 
she was awakened by her father. The mask was 
gone from the face, and he looked pale and troubled. 

"Oh, you've come back," she whispered, remem- 
bering the last caution she had received. 

"Why are you here, dearie?" asked her father. 

"You brought me, papa. Don't you remember — 
when we were playing burglars?" 

Muriel's father telephoned to the police, and re- 
ported the strange burglary. In the morning he 
spent an hour in convincing his little girl that he 
was not the man who wore the mask. 

"Well, papa," she said, in the end, "he was a very 
good burglar, wasn't he?" 



This is the Magazine Month. The publishers 
have got together and made hard and fast rules 
about cutting prices, except one takes more than 
one magazine and thus, making up a club, gets a 
very low rate. The direst calamity will overtake 
the agent that cuts rates outside the rules made and 
provided. See our rule for making clubs and the 
method of computing prices. Then send us your 
order. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 151 

The Nylaw (New York L. A. W.) held its twen- 
tieth quarterly meeting at the Crescent Athletic 
Club, Brooklyn, on Oct. ioth. It was a very jolly 
affair; a remarkably good dinner; a fine quality of 
stuff to wash it down; a lot of reminiscences; and 
many good stories. The old-timers were there in 
large numbers. Meserole made the speech of the 
evening; Beld'ing told of his experiences awheel 
during the summer months and Obermayer was 
most emphatic in speaking of what the wheel had 
done for him and what he proposed to get out of it 
in the future. The association is enjoying a high 
degree of prosperity and its quarterly dinners keep 
alive in the members a kindly and fraternal spirit, 
the outgrowth of a delightful past. 



One of the English courts recently rendered a 
decision that has caused cyclists and others not pos- 
sessed of judicial minds to sit up and gasp. The 
wise and learned magistrate imposed a double fine 
on a woman who was riding an unlighted tricycle in 
company with a number of riders whose lamps were 
aglow, remarking as he imposed the fine that such 
circumstances increased the gravity of the offense. 
The British papers since have been trying to dis- 
cover how it was figured. 



During the Hudson-Fulton celebration in New 

York the Italians had two fine parades of their own. 

At one of them over 200 wheelmen in club uniform 

and decorated wheels headed the parade. It was 

like a look into the past as they wheeled by. 



152 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

Certain good friends of the League entered into 
an agreement to contribute a sum of money on the 
first day of January in each year. It helped us over 
of a very deep cavity last year and we should have 
gone into the hole had we not been helped over it. 
This is a very gentle reminder that another January 
first is very near at hand and that this is just as se- 
vere a winter as was the last. 



The Newton Bicycle Club held a two days' 
Lobster Barbecue last month. They went by auto 
to North Scituate Beach where President Beers has 
a summer cottage. It was a jolly good feast of 
lobster stew, broiled live and salad with all the fix- 
ings. Mrs. Beers was hostess and chef and her part 
of the program was to the Queen's taste. Over 
night and home by auto the next day. We ate hear- 
tily and slept soundly. The lobsters did their part 
and left no mark behind. 



The Waltham Cycle Club, after thirty years of ex- 
istence, wound up its affairs Nov. 14. A committee 
of five disposed of the club property. The trophies 
which have adorned the rooms were given back to 
those who won them or to their nearest of kin. The 
money in the treasury was equally divided among 
fifty members. But every member retained and re- 
fused to part with the memory of past scenes and 
triumphs on the road and on the track. 



Our cradle roll has now two names for life. Boy 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 153 

and girl. The girl tried to chew up her ticket in 
order to show her appreciation of it. 



Going to have a tough winter for wheel or whoa! 



Is the bicycle going out? There are sixteen large 
factories turning out bicycles at the rate of approxi- 
mately 250,000 each year, and two of these fac- 
tories never have produced less than 40,000 bicycles 
each year, also that the present season has been the 
best that one of these two concerns ever had. 



In the pioneer days of New England it cost little 
time, labor and money to construct a road. All that 
was needful was to send out a gang of axemen to 
cut down the trees in the way, to haul out a few of 
the most obnoxious bowlders, to fashion a few 
"thankee-marms" to switch off the heavy rains and 
give the horses a chance to catch their breath while 
the carriage wheels were blocked, and lo! the road 
was made. Exhausting, the hills to climb and break- 
neck the steeps to descend. Still, that was the na- 
ture of roads; and, besides, one could always get out 
to spell the horses a bit, or to lend a hand in lifting 
a wheel out of the mire. The L. A. W. was born 
and the bad roads disappeared. 



The Lowell Courier-Citizen reports that the 
bicycle vote in that city, which a few years ago was 
much respected in the matter of bicycle paths, is no 
longer a factor. So much the worse for Lowell. 

Only the rich have more friends than they need. 



154 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

It is claimed by a correspondent of a Maine paper 
that, in proportion to population and wealth, the 
country roads are as good or better than those of 
the cities. Why country roads are not still better 
he explains as follows: "Young people flock to 
cities and consider themselves as 'progressing when 
they learn how to press a button, or hail a trolley- 
car, or catch a train.' And while cities find it nec- 
essary to dig tunnels, or to build aerial railways in 
order to get from place to place, the old folks in 
the country struggle with their farms and with the 
roads for a few years, then die and leave fair acres 
to grow up to bushes." 



In criticising the administration of the criminal 
law in this country as "a disgrace to our civiliza- 
tion," President Taft seems to disagree slightly with 
the wise and witty Frenchman who said: "The law, 
in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as 
the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets 
and to steal bread." 



Magazines make good Christmas presents and 
they are very cheap in gangs — we mean clubs. 



No scrap over the annual election, although the 
record goes out in the Scrap Book. 



The man who rides every day in the year has left 
the region of snows and gone to Southern California 
where any fellow can ride every day in the year. 



Our old friend, Joseph C. Lincoln, has made a 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 155 

hit with his latest and best novel. The previous 
books were but a sample of what he could write. 
His real ability is shown in "Keziah Coffin." It is a 
story of Cape Cod folks, with Keziah the embodi- 
ment of all that is human, patient, true, long-suffer- 
ing. She inspires the reader with admiration and 
love and she isn't alone in touching the emotions 
It is the most faithful and most interesting portrayal 
of Cape Cod life that Lincoln has given yet and the 
story itself is a charming one. 



Nixon Waterman is writing "Monitorials" for the 
Christian Science Monitor, of Boston. The paper 
now resembles very much the old-time L. A. W 
Bulletin. There is only one Waterman and the 
limerick is the thing he keeps easily on tap. 



C. De P. F. writes: You quote Carnegie in last 
Scrap Book, and say, "To die rich is a disgrace." 
This reminds me of the colored man who when asked 
what was enough, said, "A little more." 



We wonder if Carnegie will live up to his state- 
ment. Although he gives away very much money 
it has been estimated that he parts with no more than 
his income and that his capital is unimpaired. He 
once said to the late Colonel Pope: "I shall leave 
no more than five million dollars to my wife. More 
than that would be a burden that I don't care to put 
on her." 



The meanest man is the one who won't kiss a doll 
for a child when she thinks it has been hurt. 



156 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

A curious inquirer wants to know "what are the 
sister states." We should judge that they are Miss 
Ouri and Misses Sippi, Ida Ho, Mary Land, Calie 
Fornia, Ala Bama, Louisa Anna, Delia Ware and 
Minne Sota. 



Giles — Only four letters of the alphabet have ever been 
in jail. 

Smiles — True; but look how many of them are in the 
penitentiary. — Chicago News. 



JOINED IN 1894. 

A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1894 and are still in good standing. 

1092— B. F. Underhill, Boston, Jan. 5. 

1093 — George W. Washington, N. Y. City, Jan. 5. 

1095 — Charles P. Lyon, Boston, Feb. 9. 

1096 — George D. Underwood, Allston, Mass., April 5. 

1099— W. H. Sabin, Rutland, Vt, April 5. 

1101— F. Herrington Bell, Waterford, N. Y., April 12. 

1 104 — F. G. Rosensteel, Baltimore, Md., April 19. 

1 105 — Dr. A. Kettembeil, Brookline, Mass., April 19. 

1 108 — .Frank F. Koehler, Brooklyn, N. Y., April 19. 

1 1 10 — E. G. Soltmann, N. Y. City, April 26. 

mi — E. Stanley Thomas, Fremont, O., April 26. 

1 1 12 — Harry F. Wilhelm, Tyrone, Pa., April 26. 

1 1 13 — Wm. H. Wagner, York, Pa., May 3. 

1 1 14 — George H. Chambers, Philadelphia, Pa., May 3. 

1 1 17 — George Sullivan Sweet, N. Y. City, May 10. 

1118 — H. D. Leonard, Leadville, Colo., May 17. 

1 1 19 — H. E. Carter, West Somerville, Mass., May 17. 

1 120 — David Crichton, Jersey City, N. J., May 17. 

1121 — D. W. Valentine, Englewood, N. J., May 17. 

1 122— F. L. Bitler, Philadelphia, Pa., May 17. 

1 123 — Fred C. Tolman, Portland, Me., May 24. 

1125 — Wm. J. Smith, Boston, May 24. 

1 126 — John R. Schultz, St. Louis, Mo., May 24. 

1 129 — Sidney C. Ormsby, N. Y. City, May 31. 

1 132 — Herman L. Morse, East Bridgewater, Mass., June 7. 

1135 — Wm. A. Chandler, Providence, R. I., June 14. 

1 136 — Dr. A. W. Davis, Morton's Gap, Ky., June 21. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 157 

1 139— J- P. Vars, Niantic, R. I., June 21. 

1 140— Wm. R. Marshall, City of" Mexico, July 5. 

1 141 — Lyman P. Case, Winsted, Conn., July 5. 

1146-^Frederick E. Williams, New Haven, Conn., July 19. 

1147— Robert C. James, Albany, N. Y., July 19. 

1 149 — W. I. Doty, Denver, Colo., Aug. 2. 

1 152— E. H. Scheuber, N. Y. City, Aug. 2. 

1 157— A. P. Ward, Central City, la., Sept. 13. 

1 158— W. M. Perrett, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 13. 

1 159— Allen H. Crocker, Osterville, Mass., Sept. 20. 

1160 — Ernst Kern, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 11. 

1 162— Wm. Jennings, Port Chester, N. Y., Oct. 18. 

1 163 — Lorenz Golz, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 25. 

1 164— John Jenckes, Newport, R. I., Nov. 1. 

1 165 — Winthrop Girling, Chicago, III, Nov. 8. 

1 167 — J. W. Bowman, Williamsport, Pa., Dec. 20. 

ANNUAL ELECTION. 

The following is a result of the ballot for National Offi- 
cers of the L. A. W. as reported by the Scrutineers: 

Whole number of votes . cast . 72 

Necessary for a choice 37 

For President: 
Walter M. Meserole, Brooklyn, N. Y 61 

For 1 st Vice-President: 
Fred Atwater, Bridgeport, Conn 63 

For 2d Vice-Presi'dent: 

Quincy Kilby, Boston, Mass 62 

Scattering 1 

For Secretary-Treasurer: 

Abbott Bassett, Newton, Mass 67 

For Auditor: 

Geo. W. Nash, Abington, Mass 63 

Blank ballots 5 

ALONZO D. PECK, 
FRANK O. BAKER, 
ABBOT BASSETT, 

Scrutineers. 



158 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY DELEGATES. 

Under the Constitution, L. A. W., the basis of repre- 
sentation in the National Assembly must be made from 
the membership Dec. i, in each year. 

The membership Dec. i, 1909, gives to the States the 
number of representatives as below set forth: 

Calif., 1; Colo., 1; Conn., 2; D. C, 1; 111., 2; Ind., 1; 
la., 1; Ky., i; Me., 1; Md., 1; Mass., 11; Mich., 1; Minn., 1; 
Mo., 1; N. H., 1; N. J., 4; N. Y, 14; O., 2; Pa., 10; R. I., 
2; Tex., 1; Wis., 1; Total, 63. 

Article V of the Constitution provides for the nomina- 
tion of candidates. 

Sec. 2. Nominations for the office of representative may 
be made by not less than five members, who shall file the 
same with the Secretary-Treasurer during the month of 
January. 

The election takes place in March. 

ABBOT BASSETT, Sec-Treas. 



SUBSCRIPTION FUND. 

We acknowledge the receipt of the following since our 
last issue: 

H. S. Earle, Detroit, Mich $5.00 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our. profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life \ 3.00 45 

Success 1. 00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $i-75 

Century 4.00 3.S5 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





IMPEOVKD 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of to.lt you had to tighteu that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it — FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTBIBUTEB FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUABTEBS FOB 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



B«SSett'SSC»pBooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
m l?\ °U r ra l es MM? an inch - Repeat, if unchanged, $1.00 an inch. 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ' awwa 

Vol. 7. No. ii JANUARY, 1910 5 Cents 



A SONG FOR JANUARY. 
'Twas Joy that laid the passing year, 

Tis Joy that speeds the new; 
All joy that I have known, my dear, 

Hath been and is in you. 
All peace and hope of peace, my dear, 

Forever lives in you. 

Like Janus, who with faces twain 

Kept watch in ancient Rome, 
My love shall front old days again 

And days that are to come. 

So, in this month of Janus, here 

Where merge the old and new, 
Howe'er my joy may turn, my dear, 

It must envisage you. 

Its past may count but twenty suns, 

Its future reacheth far; 
Beyond the edge of time it runs, 

Beyond the utmost star. 

'Twas Joy that laid the passing year, 

'Tis Joy that speeds the new; 
All joy that I have known, my dear, 

Hath been and is in you. 
All peace and hope of peace, my dear, 

Forever lives in you. 

— T. A. Daly. 



162 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

1909 EST MORT! VIVE LA 1910. 
Please consider the usual things said and the 
usual wishes expressed. 



It was the custom in the olden days to worship on 
New Year's day, a certain god called Janus, the re- 
puted father of the month of January. The peculiar- 
ity of this god was that he had two equally thought- 
ful faces and two pairs of equally searching eyes, 
the one on the front and the other on the back of 
his head; and, in truth, entertained but the lowest 
opinion of the value for counsel of all other gods 
who did not share the like facial attributes. 



"Foresight and hindsight!" the one as all-im- 
portant as the other, this was the cardinal doctrine 
of the gospel Janus preached. No month of Jan- 
uary, then, could fitly be named after him that did 
not stand for an absolute calendar watershed divid- 
ing between the rivers of the old year that flow, in 
one direction, into the distinctly visible past, and, in 
the other, the rivers of the new year flowing toward 
the yet invisible future. Experience and surmise! 
rigid summary and hopeful anticipation! these were 
the sole moving powers through whose combined 
action on the mind could any solid result be 
achieved. 



Now, never a doubt that, with the front one of his 
two faces, old Father Janus would smile with sheer 
hilarious delight on New Year's Day were it not for 
his unhappy subjection to getting a lugubrious twist 
from that other hind face of his. Ard so, for the 



B^SSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 163 

life of him, he can't help breaking in with his little 
sermon. 

"Yes," he begins, "the longing to make every- 
body happy through the year to come is a very 
beautiful thing. But, then, why did you persist in 
making so many people unhappy last year? Why 
did you mar their lives with your fretfulness, sel- 
fishness, doggedness and lack of sympathy? Why 
were you so trying a being to put up with, instead 
of a perpetual source of sunshine and cheer? Do 
you suppose you will ever find out unless you de- 
vote some serious hours of this blessed season to 
exercising your backward-looking eyes and furrow- 
ing that noble posterior brow of yours with a little 
grave reflection in an effort to see yourself as others 
saw you, and, alas! had to see you, in many a weari- 
some, chilling, disillusioning hour?" 



Better not answer him, but think it over. 



DOWN HILL. 
A dash of air and a flash of trees, 

A quivering line of brier; 
A splash of flies like the spray of seas, 

A beetle, clumsy flier; 
A hail of sand and a charge of dust, 

A jerk on a stony heap, 
A gliding swish on the tarmac crust, 

As the cycle seems to sleep. 

A blaze of yellow and green and red 

In oceans of colored flame, 
The corn at rest in its poppy bed, 

A sketch in a quickset frame. 
A bioscope of enchanted glen 

In summer's fruitful prime; 
A vision of God's sweet world, and then- 

Another hill to climb! 



164 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

FACTS AND FIGURES FOR 1910. 
It is worth noting that the number of days in the 
year just entered on is divisible by five. 

People who were born on Feb. 29 have, strictly 
speaking, no official birthday this year. They may, 
however, celebrate their birthdays on the 28th. 

Easter this year falls upon a Sunday; this was also 
the case last year. 

It is interesting to note that the French names for 
the months are slightly different from ours. For in- 
stance, with them "January" is Janvier, "February" 
becomes Fevrier, and so on. The Japanese terms 
differ even more. 

To obtain the number of minutes in 1910, a good 
recipe is to multiply 365 (the number of days) by 24 
(the number of hours in a day), and then multiply 
the result by 60 (the number of minutes in an hour). 
This will be near enough for all practical purposes. 

The days in May and June will be much longer 
than at present, but the nights will be correspond- 
ingly shorter. 

To qualify as centenarians this year, candidates 
must have been born not later than 1810. 

It is interesting to note that the date ends in 
nothing. 

Very few born this year will breathe the air of 
two centuries as we have done. 



Among the queer results in renumbering may be 
mentioned that David J. Post gets the same num- 
ber, 108, in the regular numerical list, and in the 
list of life members. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 165 

Australia won the bicycle endurance race. Let 
'em keep it there. The bicycle endurance races in 
New York have outgrown the endurance of decent 
people. 



An individual who does not live to eat said the 
other day that life today was most interesting and 
he hoped to enjoy a good deal more of it before he 
was called, but he added, "with all the advance made 
by scientific discoveries, why has no one found out 
the way to live without eating? It is the one stu- 
pidity of nature. The alimentary canal should be 
extirpated. If it were only possible to do without a 
stomach, existence here below would be adorable!" 
It will be said this person was short-sighted if not 
worse, as food for the increasing population is the 
great business proposition, and if no one had to eat 
the shutters might as well be put up, and the uni- 
versal light turned out. No sweeter sound is to be 
heard than the ringing of the dinner bell. 



Some complaint is made by those life members 
who have taken out cards with the new numbers, 
that their life number has gone up rather than down, 
and they want to know why. The thing was ex- 
plained in the report of the meeting of the National 
Assembly held last September, but it may be well 
to once more give the facts in the case. 

In 1886-7 we had a life membership, and some 
fifty members entered upon the roll, paying the fee 
of $10. This gave them the official organ until the 
enactment of the postal law which forbade furnish- 



166 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

ing a periodical as a privilege of membership, and 
requiring that every member of an organization 
should pay a fee voluntarily for any organ issued 
by said organization. 

The life membership provision of 1886 was abol- 
ished in 1887. I n I 9° I such a provision was again 
adopted and, to live up to the postal law, $2.50 of 
the fee of $10 was set aside to pay for the organ. 
In 1904 it was decided to charge $10 for a life mem- 
bership, without the organ. Everyone who now 
goes upon the life list must, if he wants it, pay 25 
cents a year for the organ. 

In establishing the new list of 1901 the members 
of 1886 were set aside and the new comers were 
started on a list beginning at number one. The 
early ones complained loud and long at thus being 
set aside and were not satisfied that an arrange- 
ment was made to carry them on list A, while the 
new list was called list B. The question was taken 
up at the last Assembly and it was deemed an act 
of simple justice to place the earlier life members at 
the head of the list and quite unnecessary to have 
two lists. The Secretary was by a unanimous vote 
instructed to so arrange the lists at the next num- 
bering. There are 39 of the early list still upon the 
roll and if a life member finds his number increased 
by 39 it can be accounted for as above. If his num- 
ber shows an increase less than 39 it indicates that 
some of the new list have passed on. We cannot 
believe that any fair-minded member will begrudge 
the old-timers their rightful place. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 167 

Chicago will tax motorcycles $10 each. The 
principle that the bicycle riders used to make claim 
for was that in taxing vehicles a consideration 
should be given to the condition which vehicles left 
the road in after passing over the same. The 
bicycle rolled the road and left it better than before. 
The motorcycle is a heavier roller and therefore a 
better benefactor to> the road than is the bicycle. 
The rate charged by Chicago is upwards of $40 a 
thousand valuation and is most unjust. Chicago 
doubtless needs the money but why rob the poor? 



Thomas T. Eckert, Jr. (we used to call him 
"Tom") has come back to the fold for life. He was 
quite active in League affairs when Isaac B. Potter 
dominated things, and he always begged of the Se- 
retary the pencil with which was recorded the elec- 
tion of I. B. to the Presidency. He got two pencils 
which are cherished as sacred relics. Tom was and 
is a very positive man and his language was always 
most emphatic. He was never misunderstood. We 
welcome him back. 



G. L. C. writes: "And to think that you left out of 
the sister States, Virginia, two Carolinas and Con- 
nie Ticut; Florie Day; Tennie See; Indie Anna; 
Illie Nois; Orrie Gon; Arrie Zona." 

We wanted to leave some for the other fellow, 
even for him from "Rhoda Island." 



One aviator, it is said, has succeeded in repairing 
his aeroplane without descending to the earth. And 



168 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

still more remarkable, he didn't hit his thumb or 
drop the monkey wrench on anybody's head. 



One trouble with opportunity is that it knocks at 
a man's door when he hasn't any money tot invest. 



It was an English judge, who being told by a 
tramp that he was unmarried, replied: "Well, that's 
a good thing for your wife;" and it was an Ameri- 
can politician in New York who cried the other 
night from the tailboard of a dray: "If we remain 
silent the people will not hear our heart-rending 
cries!" 



Not only have American investors got the bulk 
of the roller skating business in England, but the 
American-made roller skate is nearly monopolizing 
the field. Our non-skating public can share the re- 
joicing. 



"A little two-cent stamp will take your message 
across the continent; a railroad will take you only 
a mile for the same sum, " says an exchange. 
Granted; but what's the argument? 



Prof. Whitney of the Government service says 
that Americans are eating more than they did fifty 
years ago. Not unlikely. More of 'em. 



An attempt is being made across the water to re- 
vive "ordinary" cycle racing. A subscription with 
which to purchase a cup or shield and present it to 
the National Cyclists' Union as a perpetual chal- 
lenge trophy, to be competed for once a year in a 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 169 

one mile scratch race, is being taken. The race will 
either be held' at the annual championship meet, or 
such meeting as the officials should decide. The 
promoters, it is expected, will provide a small prize 
for the winners, and — as an extra inducement for 
veterans to enter — an additional prize or medal for 
the first rider over 50 years of age. There would 
be crowds to see it if they could make a go of it. 
But then, who will make the machines? Old ones 
would not do even if they could be found. 



A woman school teacher in New York has de- 
clared in the most public way that men who smoke 
are no gentlemen. Doubtless, if we accept this, she 
will concede in return that women who smoke 
aren't, either. 



The Century Road Club has elected the following 
officers: President, John Bailie, New York City; 
first vice-president, F. H. Watrous, Chicago; second 
vice-president, Emil Leuly, West Hoboken, N. J.; 
treasurer, Fred I. Perreault, Maiden, Mass.; secre- 
tary, Fred E, Mommer, New York City. The an- 
nual ball will be held in New York City, February 
26th. 



We were talking with a very interesting young 
lady, the other day, and she began to denounce in 
words most severe the robbers of the sugar trust. 
Said I, "Just what has the sugar trust done?" Said 
she "They have been robbing the government." 
"Very well," said I, "but do you remember that 
bracelet you brought home for Anna the last time 



170 BASS.ETTS SCRAP BOOK 

you came from Europe?" "Certainly! what has that 
got to do with it?" "Did you pay duty on it?" 
"No! they didn't ask me to." "Did they see it?" 
"No, I wore it under my cloak." "In brief, then," 
said I, "you smuggled it through." "I suppose I 
did." "Well, then, why are not you a robber, just 
as much as is the sugar trust?" "Nothing of the 
kind. The bracelet was mine. I bought and paid 
for it." "Very true! but the sugar trust owned the 
sugar and they smuggled some of it through, just as 
you did the whole of your bracelet. It is merely a 
question of degree. Do not condemn the sugar 
trust. Robbers must stand together." And then a 
degree of frigidity arose which sent me home. 



Just what it is that goes to make up a "good 
time" is, very largely, a matter of opinion. Some 
people have a "good time" attending the regular 
Friday evening prayer-meetings. Others have a 
"good time" on the golf links, or playing "bridge. " 

In Spain the people have a "good time" attend- 
ing Sunday bull-fights. In some of our cities we 
have Sunday base-ball and Sunday theatres, in 
others sacred concerts, and in all of them church 
services. Sunday, with its hours of rest and recrea- 
tion, offers a good opportunity for nearly everyone 
to have a "good time." Some improve it by going 
to church and listening to a good sermon and good 
music. Some stay at home and read a good book or 
paper, or visit with the family. Others have a "good 
time" by taking a good ride on a bicycle. 

But the people do not all attend the same sort of 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 171 

a church. There wouldn't be much of a good time 
if they did. And they do not all read the same sort 
of a book. And they do not all have the same sort 
of a "good time" riding a bicycle. "What is one 
man's meat is another man's poison," and so we 
may conclude that what is one man's "good time" is 
a bore to many another. In brief, we are not all 
made alike and some of us don't want to be like 
other men. 



We have laws regulating automobiles, bicycles 
and carriages, but who will regulate the pedestrian? 
The majority of city dwellers are afoot while they 
are out of doors; for one person in a carriage there 
are a hundred on the sidewalk. And how many 
pedestrians are there who observe the rules of the 
road? As for offenders, there is the woman whom 
the attractions of the show windows draw to the 
wrong side of the walk; the man who has an idea 
the suddenness of whose coming brings him to a 
standstill; the umbrella or parasol carrier who holds 
that dangerous weapon under the arm; the gossips 
who stand in the middle of a crowded sidewalk when 
a doorway or a side street would do as well; most 
exasperating of all, the man who turns to fling a last 
word to a friend who has passed and drifts across 
the walk with eyes behind him. This last it is im- 
possible to avoid; you may dance from side to side, 
but he is sure to get you. One such offender ob- 
structs the dozen who are behind him in a hurry; for 
we are all in a hurry, whether the hurry is unneces- 
sary or not. A traffic squad empowered to arrest all 



172 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

pedestrian violators of the rules of the road would 
be the busiest body of police the city ever saw. 



JOINED IN 1895. 
A list of those who joined the League of American 
Wheelmen in 1895 and are still in good standing. 
1171 — Charles H. Govan, New York, Feb. Feb. 22. 
1 172— E. Deming Smith, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Feb. 22. 

Up to this point all memberships are due on April 1 
of each year. All that come later bear dates of 
joining. 
1 175 — Herbert L. Thowless, Newark, N. J., April 5. 
1 176 — Edward Gerbereux, Yonkers, N. Y., April 5. 
1178 — Jarvis C. Howard, New York, April 5. 
1 179 — Max Siegmund, New York, April 5. 
1181 — H. S. Gimbernat, Brooklyn, April 5. 
1 182 — Gustav J. Talleur^ New York, April 5. 
1 184 — Joseph E. Murray, Philadelphia, Pa., April 5. 
1 185— John S. Goodell, Amherst, Mass., April 12. 
1186 — Walter A. Hanson, Woburn, Mass., April 12. 
1192 — Nellie E. Foote, Boston, April 19. 
1 193 — A. T. Farrar, Jr., Brockton, April 19. 
1195 — Clarence Peters, Newark, N. J., April 19. 
1 196 — Ellwood Clark, New York, April 19. 
1198 — Edwin P. Gardner, Canandaigua, N. Y., April 19. 
1200 — A. H. Lewis, Charlestown, Mass., April 26. 
1201 — E. Henry Levy, New York, April 26. 
1203 — Sidney White, Stony Point, N. Y., April 26.' 
1205 — J. Dillaye Wiggins, Trumansburg, N. Y., April 26. 
1206 — H. W. Scattergood, Philadelphia, Pa., April 26. 
121 1— M. B. Patterson, Steubenville, O., May 3. 
1213 — E. S. Ricker, Haverhill, Mass., May 10. 
1214 — T. M. Cheesman, Garrison, N. Y., May 10. 
1215 — Harry H. Hawes, Peekskill, N. Y., May 10. 
1218— F. M. Cromwell, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., May 10. 
1220 — Irwin A. Powell, New York, May 10. 
1222— C. W. Willis, Bedford, Mass., May 17. 
i223^Mrs. C. W. Willis, Bedford, Mass., May 17. 
1224 — Walter Davidson, Worcester, Mass., May 17. 
1225 — Charles Espenschied, St. Louis, May 17. 
1227 — Wm. H. Hecox, Binghamton, N. Y., May 17. 
1231 — Irving Putnam, New York, May 17. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 173 

1236— Conway W. Sams, Baltimore, May 24. 

1239 — Stephen A. Palmer, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., May 24. 

1240 — H. D. Rumberger, Philipsburg, Pa., May 24. 

1242 — H. E. Fairbanks, Mansfield, Mass., May 31. 

1243 — William Wunsch, Allegheny, Pa., May 31. 

1245— John W. Gull, New York, May 31. 

1247— John B. White, New York, May 31. 

1250— nChas. A. Hodgman, Tuckahoe, N. Y., May 31. 

1253 — Robt. S. Morison, Cambridge, Mass., June 7. 

1254— Walter H. Baker, Roxbury, Mass., June 7. 

1255 — A. D. Smith, Manchester, N. H., June 7. 

1257 — E, E. Keller, Pittsburg, Pa., June 7. 

1258 — T. A. Gerbig, Scranton, Pa., June 7. 

1259 — Wm. T. Clerk, Washington, June 7. 

1260 — Walter S. Cox, Philadelphia, Pa., June 7. 

1262 — H. G. Ramsperger, New York, June 14. 

1263 — S. D. Silberstein, New York, June 14. 

1264 — Kenyon Fortesque, New York, June 14. 

1266 — Arthur H. Delano, Brooklyn, June 14. 

1267 — Alvin Conklin, New Brighton, N. Y., June 14. 

1270 — E. F. Arthurs, Baltimore, June 28. 

1275 — James Davidson, Brooklyn, June 28. 

1276 — Samuel Pearsall, New York, June 28. 

1277 — Frank C. Moore, Brooklyn, June 28. 

1278 — Julius G. Linsley, Oswego, N. Y., June 28. 

1279 — Louis J. Ernst, Rochester, N. Y., June 28. 

1280 — E. F. Henson, Philadelphia, June 28. 

1284 — James L. Bourne, Providence, July 5. 

1285 — C. R. Benton, La Crosse, Wis., July 5. 

1287 — Alex M. Foreman, Brooklyn, July 12. 

1288— E. F. Stephenson, Tarrytown, N. Y., July 12. 

1289 — Palmer Cox, New York, July 12. 

1290 — John E. Scally, San Francisco, July 12. 

1293 — Norman A. Hurd, Waucoma, la., July 19. 

1294 — Calvin Ackley, Kinderhook, N. Y., July 19. 

1299 — Geo. H. Hodenpyl, Summit, N. J., July 26. 

1300 — George H. Wesley, Port Chester, N. Y., July 26. 

1301 — Frank D. Cromwell, Philadelphia, Pa., July 26. 

1303 — George W. Boswell, St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 2. 

1304 — Alfred L. Harder, New York, Aug. 2. 

1305 — John R. Williams, St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 9. 

1306 — J. A. Nicholson, Hornellsville, N. Y., Aug. 9. 

1308 — Oliver Hull, Brooklyn, Aug. 16. 



174 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

1310 — S. C. Hogsett, Vernon, Texas, Aug. 16. 

1312 — A. P. Curtis, Marlboro, Mass., Aug. 23. 

1312a — Miss Julia W. Latimer, Brooklyn, Aug. 23. 

1313 — Clarence G. Wilson, Jersey City, Aug. 23. 

1314— Harlan W. Pierce, Toulon, 111., Aug. 30. 

1315 — C. M. Dearborn, Hampton, N. H., Aug. 30. 

1317 — R. H. Mitchell, New York, Aug. 30. 

1320— S. B. Lee, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 13. 

1322 — W. R. Bascome, New York, Sept. 20. 

1324 — R. C. Rathbone, New York, Sept. 27. 

1326— W. H. Smith, Jr., Jeddo, Pa., Oct. 4. 

1328 — A. S. Murray, Jr., New York, Oct. 4. 

1329 — H. I. Richmond, Jr., Little Compton, R. I., Oct. 11. 

1330 — H. M. Chester, New York, Oct. 18. 

1331— E. W. Pattison, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 25. 

1334 — Frank O. Baker, Boston, Nov. 1. 

1335 — Dr. Lester Curtis, Chicago, Nov. 8. 

1336 — C. L. Horton, New York Nov. 8. 

1337 — Chas. P. Steinmetz, Schenectady, N. Y., Nov. 15. 

1339— Thomas E. White, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 15. 

1342 — Chas. D. Smedley, Wayne, Pa., Nov. 22. 

1343 — Miss Emma Burnett, New York, Nov. 29. 

1345 — Thos. W. Sparks, Philadelphia, Nov. 29. 

1346 — O. G. Bogert, Brooklyn, Nov. 29. 

1348— W. G. Wood, Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. 20. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1.00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1-75 

Century 4.00 3,85 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





REGULAR 



IMPKOVKD 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTEE FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Ba&ett'S Scrap Bool< 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, £1.00 an inch! 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ' awwu 

Vol. 7. No. 12 FEBRUARY, 1910 5 Cents 



THE JUDGE IN THE AUTO. 
Maud Muller on a summer's day- 
Put up a bluff at raking hay; 
But on the highroad kept an eye 
In case a judge came riding by. 

And, sure enough, a judge did pass 

At forty miles an hour, alas! 

It gives to romance quite a jar, 

The modern honk-honk touring car. 

Of all sad words that lips have dropped 

The saddest are these, "He might have stopped. 



THE MONTH OF FEWEST DAYS. 
This used to be our battle month. 



League history is full of struggles for office and 
over League policies and all taking place in Feb- 
ruary. 



No battles now. All is peacefulness. Peaceful- 
ness that is vociferous. 



The Boston Bi Club dinner comes in this month. 
It is one of the events that connects us with the 
past. 



178 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

"What will you do when you are old?" somebody 
asks. Try to forget the foolish things we did when 
we were young. 



We had so many Christmas Cards, so many New 
Year's Greetings, so many expressions of apprecia- 
tion and good will during the holiday season that 
we are staggered at the thought of answering them 
individually. To one and all, then, let us say: The 
bouquet comes to us beautiful and fragrant, and we 
are duly grateful. "We looks towards you and we 
likewise bows." 



It's rather awkward to nudge a man that has for- 
gotten to pay up on a voluntary subscription. It 
seems rude. Nevertheless it is embarrassing to 
have the payments delayed or forgotten. This para- 
graph is written in order that some of our very good 
friends may read between the lines and see if they 
can find a message. 



Maurice Maeterlinck, the renowned poet, is an 
ardent devotee of the motorcycle, and makes excur- 
sions to the mountains and back from his home on 
the Mediterranean. In a recent interview in the 
London Daily Mail he is quoted as saying: "Some 
people laugh at me; a poet on a motorcycle! They 
think it incongruous. But consider how much more 
convenient it is than a motor car. You are near the 
road, you see all that there is to be seen. You can 
go along little paths, delightful, quiet woodways 
where no motor can pass." 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 179 

Some Virginians are going to try to pass a law 
providing that certain physical qualifications shall be 
possessed by persons intending to marry. If they 
also provide certain financial qualifications, they will 
have a grand old State. 



As we write this paragraph we are very hungry. 
When you read it our hunger will be gone for the 
Boston Bicycle Club Dinner (Feb. 12) will have 
been eaten. 



The Newton Bicycle Club (Mass.) is looking for- 
ward to its 200th regular meeting in July. Pretty 
good record and we think the top-notcher. 



Brown, the cycle dealer of bicycle row in Boston, 
has retired. Quite a lot of business in summer, but 
this worming one's w r ay through the winter months 
is the great problem that has been up to the makers 
and dealers from the verv first. 



During the Peary-Cook controversy we made 
note of the experiences of John M. Verhoeff, of 
Louisville, on a Peary Expedition. The New Haven 
Register, Jan. 25, has this item: 

"An effort to ascertain the fate of John M. Ver- 
hoeff, a subscriber to one of the Peary funds, and 
who was lost on one of the Arctic expeditions, will 
be made by the New Haven Bicycle Club Veteran 
Association, of which he was an active member. 
The matter was brought up during the annual re- 
union of the organization last evening, and it was 
decided to communicate with Commander Pearv and 



180 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

find out if possible where he met his death and the 
circumstances." 

Mr. Verhoeff was an undergraduate at Yale, 
which accounts for the interest shown by the New 
Haven wheelmen. He was an active man in every 
pursuit and an enthusiastic wheelman always. 



The League's thirtieth birthday occurs this year. 
Wonder if Will Pitman will go down to Newport 
and sit on the rocks where the picture was taken in 
1880? Five years ago he did it and drank in a lot 
of inspiration in going over the memories of the 
birthday. Pitman is, and always was, an enthusiast 
for cycling and its adherents. Wouldn't it be a 
good thing if we had more just such enthusiasts? 
And wouldn't it have kept cycling alive if all who 
went into it had become inoculated with the germ of 
enthusiasm which entered into the blood and the 
heart of "Happy Days"? 



St. Valentine's Day has come around again. We 
wonder how many of us send valentines just to keep 
ourselves young? Away back in 1645 there were 
kickers and scoffers, and no doubt men were to be 
found even at that time of literary following who 
discussed the degeneration of the stage and of 
poetry and the arts in general. At any rate, Lord 
North, in his "Forest of Varieties," in a letter to his 
brother, poured out his bile on St. Valentine's Day. 
"A lady of wit and qualitie," he says, "whom you 
well know, would never put herself to the chance of 
a Valentine, saying that shee would never couple 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 181 

herselfe but by choyce. The custome and charge of 
Valentines is not ill left, with many other such costly 
and idle customs, which by a tacit generall consent 
wee lay down as obsolete." That's it! The thing is 
obsolete. It will take more than a Valentine to 
keep some of us young. 



Edward F. Tolman, League member No. 10, died 
at Worcester, Mass., January 2 last. Who does not 
know Ned Tolman, who used to ride a 60-inch wheel 
and always gave and received the glad hand among 
us. We knew him in 1881 when as a member of the 
firm of Hill & Tolman, of Worcester, he put on the 
market an automatic alarm bell used on the high 
wheel. We last saw him at the great meeting of 
old-time cyclers at the reservoir in 1904. He was 
very prominent in business and social affairs in 
Worcester and he leaves a host of friends. A wife 
and two daughters survive him. 



C. H. G., No. 749, writes: "I founded the organi- 
zation here known as the Press Wheelmen in the 
winter of 1894-95, and I recall my chagrin and dis- 
gust when I failed to make an L. A. W. card a con- 
dition of membership. I pointed out to my fellow- 
members that we were indebted to the League for 
all the rights and privileges we enjoyed as wheel- 
men and that we were bound in common honesty 
and decency to identify ourselves with that great or- 
ganization, but all to no purpose. They could not 
reconcile themselves to separation from the addi- 
tional 75 cents. I withdrew from the society shortly 



182 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

afterward, my chief purpose being defeated, and I 
don't believe it has contained for the last ten years 
a single member who rides a bicycle. 

"I take great pride in showing my surviving fel- 
low-wheelmen of long ago, many of whom joined 
the L. A. W. through my persuasion, that I am the 
only one of all the crowd that is not a quitter. But 
I realize that it is a selfish pride and that I would 
have been spared much disappointment and had a 
much more exalted opinion of human nature if they 
had remained loval." 



Dr. Andrew Jackson Davis, whom we used to 
greet so heartily at League Meets, died at Water- 
town, Mass., January 13, aged 84 years. He was a 
persistent rider of the wheel until within a few 
months of his death, was for many years a loyal 
League member and of a most cheerful disposition. 

Dr. Davis was one of the three or four leaders of 
the spiritualistic movement in this country. He pub- 
lished more than thirty volumes, his best known 
being "Divine Revelations," which became a stand- 
ard work on spiritualism. 

He was born at Blooming Grove, near Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., Aug. 11, 1826, and received only the 
most rudimentary education. 

While a young man he developed so-called clair- 
voyant powers and became known as the "Pough- 
keepsie seer." 

When nearly sixty years old he began the study 
of medicine and obtained the degree of M. D. from 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 183 

the United States Medical College in New York. 
He came to Boston and took up active practice. 

Dr. Davis was twice married. His second wife 
survives him. There were no children. 



About fifty members of the New Haven Bicycle 
Club Veterans attended the annual reunion on Jan- 
uary 24. 

The movement to erect a monument to the de- 
ceased members of the organization was also inau- 
gurated, this to be placed at the grave of F. N. 
Baker in Evergreen Cemetery. 

The officers elected for the ensuing year were: L. 
Burton Sperry, president; A. G. Fisher, secretary 
and treasurer (for the 20th time). The executive 
committee will be named later, and the summer out- 
ing (by automobile) will also be fixed later. 

Among the speakers were: Eugene F. Russell of 
Bridgeport, George A. Pickett, George R. Coan, 
Frank Thompson, William Frisbie of East Orange, 
N. J., W. F. Bishop and C. E. Larom. The associa- 
tion now has 75 members out of an original 250. 



The annual meeting of the Boston Bi Club took 
place January 12. Officers elected: President, John 
B. Kelley; Secretary, Frank M. Weston; Treasurer, 
Augustus Nickerson; Captain, Dr. W. G. Kendall. 



Bush Englehartt, Wallace, Idaho, has an Ordi- 
nary 50-inch bicycle, in riding condition. Would 
like to arrange an exchange. 



184 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Mr. Edward P. Burnham, of Hemet, Cal., at one 
time among the fastest American cycle-racing men; 
a member of the famous three of the Columbia rac- 
ing team — Hendee, Rowe, Burnham; and for many- 
years the L. A. W. handicapper; is now raising 
oranges and growing wealthy. He sends us his 
photo which shows him mounted on an ordinary 
Victor of the vintage of 1885, and he tells us the 
tires are still in fine condition. He has an orange 
grove of 750 trees and sends us a picture of a tree 
which bore 90 oranges, not one of which weighed 
less than half a pound. Began picking December 8 
and sold the whole crop to a local dealer for 25 
cents a dozen. Mr. Burnham says, as they all do, 
"there's nothing like the glorious climate of Cali- 
fornia." As for ourselves, we like oranges but we 
detest earthquakes. 



John Quincy Kilby, our new Vice President. He 
was named "John" by his parents, but, for economy 
of time, space or ink, we can't say which, he dropped 
the "John" and manages to live without it. Born at 
Eastport, Me., Feb. 9, 1854, the family removed to 
Chelsea, Mass., in 1865. Was one year in the gram- 
mar school and three years in the high school. His 
attention turned theatre wards and he joined the 
profession in 1876, playing small parts "in a large 
way." In 1886 he became Treasurer of the Boston 
Theatre under the late Eugene Tompkin's manage- 
ment, and continued as such for 15 years, till 1901, 
when Mr. Tompkins retired. Mr. Kilby followed 
Mr. Tompkins and became his private secretary, a 
position which he held till the death of his chief in 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 185 

1909. He married in 1885 and has one daughter. 
Has been a member of the L. A. W. for 22 years. 
As a wheelman he holds the record for having rid- 
den in every city and town in Massachusetts, a 
record the like of which is not held by any other 
person of any other State. Mr. Kilby has done con- 
siderable in the literary line, having written very 
many creditable specimens of verse. Has written 
and rewritten the books of Hanlon's "Superba" and 
"Phantasma." His last work is the "History of the 
Boston Theatre," written in conjunction with Mr. 
Eugene Tompkins. His greatest honor, undoubt- 
edly, is his advancement to the Vice Presidency of 
the L. A. W. 



A POPULAR BIRTH MONTH. 
February, the shortest of all the months, is the 
one most crowded with the birthdays of famous 
people. 

Though the shortest of the months, and one of the 
least pleasant, in the northern hemisphere, February 
is perhaps more closely packed with famous birth- 
days, or the birthdays of famous people, than any 
other of the twelve. Note the names: 

1 — Edward Coke, 1551-52. 

2 — William Borlase, 1696. 

3 — Mendelssohn, 1809. 

3 — Horace Greeley, 181 1. 

3 — Sidney Lanier, 1842. 

4 — George Lillo, 1693. 

5 — John Witherspoon, 1722. 

6 — Sir Henry Irving, 1838. 

7 — Charles Dickens, 1812. 



186 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

8 — John Ruskin, 1819. 

9 — Wm. Henry Harrison, 1773. 
10 — Paganini, 1784. 
11 — Thomas A. Edison, 1847. 
12 — Abraham Lincoln, 1809. 
12 — Charles Darwin, 1809. 
13 — General John A. Rawlins, 1831. 
14 — St. Valentine. 
14 — General W. S. Hancock, 1824. 
15— Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, 1829. 
16 — Henry Wilson, 1812. 
17 — Cadwallader Colden, 1688. 
18 — Charles Lamb, 1775. 
19 — Alessandro Volta, 1745. 
20 — Joseph Jefferson, 1829. 
21 — Pierre du Bosc, 1623. 
22 — George Washington, 1732. 
22 — James Russell Lowell, 1819. 
23 — Samuel Pepys, 1632. 
24 — George William Curtis, 1824. 
25 — Cardinal Newman, 1801. 
26 — Christopher Marlowe, 1564. 
26 — Victor Hugo, 1802. 
2J — Henry W. Longfellow, 1807. 
28— Dr. W. T. Grenfell, 1863. 
29 — Rossini, 1792. 



W. M. G. writes: — "I am 73 years of age and I 
still ride a wheel, that is to say, when the weather is 
open. I ride for fresh air and exercise and I find my 
appetite good, my digestion perfect and my wife tells 
me that my disposition is more peaceful. What a 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 187 

great pity that more do not ride. I never did like 
the scorchers who cared for no more than making 
fast time, but I found among the riders for health 
and pleasure some of the most delightful acquaint- 
ances that 1 possess. What can we do to bring the 
departed back into line? It is not so far back that 
all wheelmen were friends at sight. Now they are 
not in sight. However, what's the use! We are in 
it to stay. You and I, Mr. Secretary, will keep it up 
till the last tire busts." 



S. C. P. writes: — "I am a friend to every wheel- 
man living and I would like to shake hands with 
everyone of them. But we can't get together any- 
more and why not talk it all over in the Scrap Book? 
1 believe in the little Scrap Book and I wish more 
of the members would write for it, tell us what they 
are doing and proposing something for the rest of 
us to do. Let's get nearer together. We are united 
for sentimental reasons and why not work sentiment 
to its limit? Send an item to the Scrap Book once 
in a while. The editor can work Boston all right, 
but Boston isn't all. They point the way when they 
have the Wheel About the Hub, the Cycle Club 
Banquets, etc., but can't some of the rest of us fol- 
low? I was once of Boston, but now I am an exile 
and I miss the jolly times we wheelmen used to 
have in the Hub. But then we can't all do in a day 
what has taken Boston years to do." 



K. writes: — "In sending, as a life member, my 
yearly subscription, as promised, I want to say that 



188 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

I am surprised and disappointed at the meagre re- 
sponse which the appeal for subscriptions from the 
life members has met with. I had an idea that every 
life member would be willing to pool in at least a 
dollar a year to help keep the L. A. W. on top of 
the earth, but I think that less than half the lifers 
responded. I believe we ought to keep the organi- 
zation alive 'A rose to the living is better than 
sumptuous wreaths to the dead,' as Nixon Water- 
man puts it. If the lifers will not do it I hope the 
annuals will come forward and endow the institu- 
tion, yes, and pension the veteran Secretary. 
(Don't you cut that out, Mr. Secretary. I want to 
say it and I don't want you to stop me! See!)" 



Determined to say something original, a univer- 
sity professor declares that "a dollar a day buys 
more than it is worth." 



'Twas the age of wireless telephone. 

"Gimme Z double L — 79,454, Kazoo, quick!" said 
the patient subscriber. 

And, as he listened, this came right back at him 
from the exchange: 

"Airsbusy!" 



Now tired, business-weary men their play times 
are beginning; we've reached the summer season 
when the outing has its inning. 



We note that several of our members are going 
abroad. Not for us. We are going down to the 
edge and let our eyes follow their path across the 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American. Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1.00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. . ! 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75: 

Century 4.00 3.S5 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 



Munsey 1.00 



•95 



Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.8", 

Scientific American 3.00 275 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 




REGULAR 






IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOR 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Bassett'S Scrap BooK 

A MAGA2INE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for l.icy.les and sundries. ALo for anything useful to 
men. Our ratrs :— #1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 81.00 an inch? 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3. 1879. 

Vol. 8. No. i MARCH, igio 5 Cents 

HOPING FOR SPRING. 
March is inauguration month. Inaugurates the 
riding season. 



Now day and night are equal, and yet there is 
always too much night. 



New York's heaviest taxpayer is a woman. She 
can't vote, but perhaps she is able to control the vote 
of her chauffeur. 



Italy is the first country to insist upon the regula- 
tion that motorcycles must be fitted with horns giv- 
ing them a high note in order to distinguish them 
from automobiles. The latter must use horns giving 
only bass notes. 



The C. T. C. has changed its London office from 
Victoria Street to 280 Euston Road, London, N. W. 
The offices comprise the first and second floors in an 
imposing building lately erected by the London, 
County, and Westminster Bank, who occupy the 
ground floor. As this is quite close to Euston, St. 



2 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Pancras, and King's Cross Stations, and within a few 
yards of the Metropolitan and Tube Stations, it will 
be much more accessible for both provincial and 
Metropolitan members than Victoria Street. 



Championship contests have been arranged by the 
International Cyclists' Union for July 17, 21 and 24. 
They will be held in Brussels. The 191 1 champion- 
ships will be held in Turin. The congress rejected 
the proposition of the American delegates that 
cyclists should be authorized to appeal to the inter- 
national union in cases where the national bodies 
refused licenses. 



Buffalo's oldest bicycle club — the Buffalo Bicycle 
Club — had a reunion and banquet on Washington's 
Birthday, Feb. 22. The club was organized on that 
day, 1879 — 31 years ago. 



" 'The day on which the year of our Lord in the 
Church of England beginneth,' is the designation of 
the 25th of March in the old English prayer-books; 
and this, not in reference to the church year, for that 
began then as now, with Advent, but meaning 
thereby the civil year. So recently was the change 
made from this day to Jan. 1 — a century and a half 
ago — that our great-grandfathers kept New Year's 
Day and the Feast of the Annunciation, and for over 
four centuries previous in our Fatherland Lady Day 
had ushered in the new year. The recurrence, then, 
of the 25th of March, now simply a minor festival in 
the calendar was to our ancestors, full of associa- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 3 

tions, religious and social, of a happy new year." — 
W. S. Bogart. 

"In England, as early as the seventh century, the 
year began on the 25th of December, or Christmas 
day, and this date was used by most persons until 
the thirteenth century. But in the twelfth century 
the Anglican Church required that their year should 
commence on the 25th of March (Annunciation, or 
Lady Day). This rule was adopted by the Civilians 
of the fourteenth century, and was adhered to until 
1752. It was known as the Legal, Civil, or Ecclesi- 
astical year. The 1st of January, however, had been 
considered as the beginning of the historical year 
from the time of the Conquest, 1066, and in Scotland 
from 1600." — Spencer Bonsall. 



Touring in Belgium will not be such a difficult 
matter in the future as it has been in the past. The 
Belgian Ministry of Public Works is spending 10,000 
francs for the erection of 1,482 signboards through- 
out the unposted districts. 



The National Cycling Association held its annual 
meeting at Hotel Bartholdi, New York City, Feb. 1. 

Daniel M. Adee, who also is president of the Cen- 
tury Road Club Association, was re-elected presi- 
dent; Charles B. Bloemecke, of Newark, first vice- 
president; P. T. Powers, Jersey City, N. J., second 
vice-president, and R. A. Van Dyke, secretary. 

No treasurer was chosen for the reason that the 
chairman of the Board of Control fills that office. 
R. F. Kelsey again was elected to that position, and 



4 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

with one exception the Board of Control will be the 
same as that of last year. 

The Board of Appeals will remain the same as last 
year with a change in the chairmanship. M. L. 
Bridgman, who has long held that position, asked 
to be relieved because of continued illness, and N. E. 
Turgeon, of Buffalo, was made chairman. Bridg- 
man will, however, remain upon the board, the other 
members of which are: R. G. Betts and A. G. Batch- 
elder, New York City; S. A. Miles, Chicago, and 
Dr. Charles G. Plummer, Salt Lake City. 



Men who claim to own the air above their prem- 
ises will have to fight it out with the comets. 



F. C. O., of Pittsburg, writes: — 

"I always read with a great deal of pleasure the 
monthly edition of Scraps. It always takes me back 
to the good old times when, with congenial com- 
panions, we would start out for a good ride on the 
winged steed, and such thoughts invariably make me 
wish for a return of those good days, although I am 
fully aware that the inevitable increase in years, 
coupled with the decided addition of avoirdupois 
(now 210) would compel me to take very short trips 
with long rests between. With best wishes for the 
good old L. A. W. and its veteran Secretary, I 
remain, etc." 



Although it has been a Mecca for tourists for 
years, strange to say, the trail leading up Mt. Wil- 
son, near Pasadena, Cal., had never been measured 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 5 

and properly marked. That is, not until last week, 
when two ingenious youths undertook the self 
appointed task. It is a wonder some one had not 
thought of the simple method before. The boys 
took the front forks and wheel of a bicycle fitted 
with a cyclometer. Attaching a broomstick it was 
an easy matter to push the wheel up the long, steep 
trail. The route was properly marked by tenths of 
miles. 



March 9, 1796, Napoleon Bonaparte and Jose- 
phine Beauharnais were married by a justice of the 
peace. 

"It was just five months since the bride had called 
to thank the groom for giving back her husband's 
sword, and fifteen months after this husband's death. 
Napoleon was twenty-seven; Josephine was thirty- 
three, but the bridegroom swore he was twenty-eight 
and the lady twenty-nine. As a fabricator he wins 
our admiration." — From "Little Journeys to the 
Homes of Famous Women," by Elbert Hubbard. 



There will be no bicycle show in Paris this year 
according to advices from abroad. The French 
Cycle Factors Association has voted against holding 
the annual exhibition. 



The directors of the Yerkes observatory says 
Halley's comet will be visible to the naked eye April 
1. Take off your spectacles, and as for goggles, well, 
there! 



The Boston Bicycle Club held its 32d annual 



6 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

dinner at Hendrie's on Saturday evening, Feb. 12. 
Some fifty members of the Club from Boston, New 
York, Providence and Dover, N. H., met together 
for a jolly time. 

From the program we gather that 

"It has been averred, and by no less a personage 
than the Reverend Cotton Flannel Mather himself, 
that the present Hendrie's superimposes the self- 
same spot where ages ago the Algonquin Indians 
were wont to hold their annual winter sports, under 
the auspices of the Boston Icicle Club. And oft the 
frost-bound welkin gaily rang with echoes of their 
tribal chant, Bibamus. 

"An inquisitive New Zealander peeping in upon 
our time-honored Winterfest might lightly character- 
ize it as 'a bunch of middle-aged lobsters making a 
noise,' but, oh, my friends, it is more than that, more 
than that. That night we are all equals, compeers 
and intimate friends. It is a time of nickname and 
democracy, of persiflage and gastronomy. We know 
no aristocracy of talent, wealth or renown. Why 
should we? Calves have brains, pirates have treas- 
ure, and the name of Major Taylor is spoke on 
Europe's thrones. We are all royalty, all proletariat. 
The New Yorker stands close beside the man from 
Chelsea, while in unison they intone Bibamus with 
voices bravely off the key. The man from South 
Boston smiles boldly into the eyes of the Brookline- 
ite, while he of Providence offers a friendly light to 
him of Dover, N. H. 

"The dinner was served in the following courses: 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 7 

I. Stimulation. II. Anticipation. III. Realiza- 
tion. IV. Commendation. V. Deglutition. VI. 
Nutrition. VII. Repletion. VIII. Satisfaction." 

After the feast came the unbending. Professor 
Edmands, son of "Billy" of the Club, gave a most 
creditable exhibition of feats in legerdermain, 
wherein things came and went, no one could tell 
how. 

One of the verse-makers of the Club (the Club 
has many) was called upon for his annual contribu- 
tion and Abbot Bassett began to read verse dating 
back to the garden of Eden. He had not proceeded 
far when Quincy Kilby butted in with a versified 
objection. From that point the two verse-makers 
had it back and forth, giving and taking good na- 
tured whacks, and conducting club members through 
the historic fields of the Flood, Tower of Babel, Red 
Sea, Crusades, Columbus, Indians, etc. Another 
poet, Augustus Nickerson, finally jumped into the 
fray, poured oil on troubled waters, and the whole 
thing ended in a concerted recitation by both verse- 
makers. It was a genuine surprise and seemed to 
take. 

As usual the dinner was a great success and one 
of the things that draws men together and holds 
them. 



The Rhode Island Division, L. A. W., held its mid- 
winter reunion at Hotel Dreyfus, Providence, on 
Wednesday evening, February 9. Very large chunks 
of good-fellowship were in evidence and a very jolly 



8 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

time was had. George L. Cooke was toastmaster 
and was full of his bright and witty hits at those 
upon whom he called for speeches. All parts of the 
State were represented. 



The Bicycling Committee of the New York Ath- 
letic Club for 1910 is composed of Charles J. Kitner, 
chairman; A. Parks Smith and H. W. Wilson. 



The annual reunion of the Brighton Bicycle Club 
of Cincinnati, organized April 11, 1878, took place at 
the Gibson House, Cincinnati, on Saturday, Feb. 19 
last. Harry C. G. El'lard, the first President, was 
toastmaster and had appropriate introductions and 
hits for each speaker. A menu decorated with poeti- 
cal effusions by Poet Lariat Ellard-was an attractive 
feature of the occasion. 

[The date of organization places the club in second 
place in the history of the wheel. No other club now 
in evidence was organized in 1878, save the San 
Francisco Club, Dec. 13, 1878. The old Suffolk 
Club, of Boston, lasted but a few years. The 
Brighton Club did not become a League Club as did 
the Massachusetts and the Essex and therefore we 
have no record of it on our books. The above two 
clubs and several others came along in 1879. The 
Boston Club was organized February, 1878. We 
find no record of the Brighton Club in the only 
wheel paper of the day, the American Bicycling 
Journal. Better prove your record, Mr. President 
Ellard. We shall have a lot of the old ones after us 
if you don't. Ed.] 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 9 

NIXON WATERMAN. 

Some of Waterman's "Monitorials" in Christian Science 
Monitor: 

A match and an umbrella 
Are dissimilar, and yet 
They's either of them likely to 
Go out if it is wet. 



Mrs. A. — Your new Boston chef knows just how to bake 
beans, no doubt. 

Mrs. B. — Ah, yes, indeed! He takes them from the oven 
at just the right Browning point. 



Mary had a little lamb, 

As has been said before, 
But the meat trust now has boosted the price 

Till she won't have any more. 



"I can marry," said he, "any girl that I please!" 

.Which was true, but he knew with regret 
There was none he could please, that's the reason that he's 

A lonely old bachelor yet. 



There seem to be good reasons that quite warrant 
The view that with photographers prevails, 

That pictures of Great Britain's heir apparent 
Apparently are really prints of Wales. 



Since "firemen" attempt to stop 

The flames that seek to spread 
By pouring on water it seems 'though they orter 

Be "watermen" instead. 
And 'though the fireman's red shirt 

As the ladder's length he mounts 
'Mid walls that are blazing, is really amazing, 

His hose is the thing that counts. 



William J. Smith died Jan. 15, 1910, at Bristol, 
England, where he had been living for more than a 
year. He was one of our oldest riders, having 
begun his wheeling in 1876 and having made several 



10 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

tours awheel before coming to this country in the 
early eighties. He was a member of the League of 
American Wheelmen and of the Boston Bicycle Club 
and had kept up his riding until compelled by ill- 
health to discontinue it. On every rideable Sunday 
the year round he might be found with a few chosen 
friends enjoying the attractions of the country roads 
anywhere within fifty miles of Boston. Like all sin- 
cere wheelmen he was an ardent lover of nature. 

"Smithy," as we knew him, was one of the most 
modest of men in regard to his own acquirements 
and abilities. Few of his acquaintances knew that he 
was an amateur photographer of refined taste and 
practical equipment; that he could read and write 
several foreign languages with facility; that his 
knowledge of machinery and mechanics was far- 
reaching and thorough; that he was a mine of infor- 
mation on the subject of sailing and steam vessels, 
from the yacht to the steamship. Indeed, it would 
be hard to find any subject upon which he could not 
converse intelligently and entertainingly. And 
withal, he never pushed himself forward but kept in 
the background until a quietly dropped word 
showed how intelligent and bright a man he was. 

He sleeps in a quiet little English country church- 
yard a fewi miles from Bristol. His friends will miss 
him. May he rest in peace. — Quincy Kilby. 



Francis P. Prial, for many years editor of "The 
Wheel," New York, died at his home in New York 
City on January 31 last. He was one of the strong 
men of the cycling world, coming into it as one of 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 11 

the editors of the "Amateur Athlete," then L. A. W- 
organ, in 1884. In 1886 he became editor of "The 
Wheel," and in that capacity went through historic 
cycling from its gradual rise to its decline. An un- 
lucky venture in a drygoods journal wrecked a for- 
tune made with his bicycling paper, and in 1900 he 
sold out to the "Bicycling World" all his interest in 
"The Wheel." After that he was for a short time 
with the "Motor Boat" and later was president of 
the company publishing the "Motorcycle Illustrated." 
He was stricken with typhoid fever at the Madison 
Square Garden show and was its victim. 

Mr. Prial was always a potent factor in the cycling 
world. Well educated, a keen appreciation of what 
is best in all things, a companionable associate 
always, and a credit to the sport always so near 
to his heart. 



Queer stunts on bicycles are still cropping up. 
One of the queerest recently was performed by a 
Frenchman, Jean Marin, who now is grandiloquently 
styled the "Bicycle Champion of Impassibility." He 
"won" the "title" by remaining seated on his wheel 
without moving for ten days. His rival for the 
"title" fell into a doze on the ninth day and igno- 
miniously tumbled off his machine. The exhibition 
took place in a French music hall — a truly "continu- 
ous performance" — and a great many people paid 
good money to see the two fanatics balance them- 
selves on their motionless machines. 



f On account of the 'greatt inconveniences by 



12 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

persons irregular riding through the streets of the 
Towne, and galloping,' it was ordered (March 14, 
1656) that for every offence of this kind the delin- 
quent should be fined two shillings and sixpense; 
except 'upon dayes of military exercise or any ex- 
traordinary case require it.' " — S. G. Drake. And 
they were going it some, even then. 



A new type of goggles has been invented by an 
English concern. They are constructed to allow the 
wearer to see what is going on behind him, which is 
made possible by a clever arrangement of mirrors 
on the ordinary glass faces. They do not hinder for- 
ward vision. Good thing for those who write bicycle 
history. 



If the officials of Portugal do not kill bicycling in 
that country it will be because of an unquenchable 
desire to ride and not because of the drastic regula- 
tions that have just been put into effect. The city 
of Lisbon has decreed that every cyclist must be 
registered and pay 200 reales. Not only that, but 
before he can secure a license the luckless rider must 
be vouched for by ten other cyclists or by a club, and 
must give up 600 reales more upon! issuance of the 
license. A large colored badge must be carried and 
none must ride faster than a trotting horse. 



Here is a brief description a Kansas editor gives of 
a speech recently made by a congressman. "His 
celluloid cuffs rattled like a barn door in a high 
wind." 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 13 

ASSEMBLY DELEGATES. 

In accordance with Section 3, Article V of the Constitu- 
tion, I appoint the following as delegates to the National 
Assembly of the League of American Wheelmen: 

New York, 14— T. T. Eckert, Jr., Henry G. Wynn, N. S. 
Cobleigh, W. R. Pitman, Fred G. Lee, F. W. Brooks, Jr.. 
J. C. Howard, C. Lee Abell, John F. Clarke, L. P. Cowell, 
Geo. T. Stebbins, Wm. H. Hale, L. P. Coleman, A. G. 
Batchelder. 

Fraternally, 

Walter M. Meserole, 

President. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1910. 



ANNUAL ELECTION. 

In view of the fact that in no case is there more than one 
nomination for the office of Representative, it seems un- 
necessary to go to the expense and trouble of an election 
by mail. 

In pursuance therefore of the authority invested in me, 
I now declare the several members who have been nomi- 
nated, to be duly elected, and I am anxious that as many 
as are able to arrange their plans to that end, will attend 
the National Assembly at Boston, Massachusetts, in Sep- 
tember, 1910. 

Fraternally, 

Walter M. Meserole, 

President. 



THE NEW OBSESSION. 

Oh, it's motoring here and it's motoring there, 

It's motoring, motoring, everywhere. 

The babies in motoring carriages go, 

The kids soon will coast on the silvery snow 

In automobiles up steep automoslides 

In wildly hilarious automorides. 

Our dancers are dancing gay automojigs; 

Our doctors drive round in their automogigs; 

And those who would perch on fame's highest bars 

Now hitch up their wagons to automostars. 



14 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

The farmer is smiling his harvest to gain 

When loading his hay on his automowain, 

Or scarring the earth with his automoplow, 

Or milking his gasoline automocow; 

Or sending the choreman with automolegs 

To gather each morn the fresh automoeggs 

'Neath the automohens in the automocoop, 

To the tune of the rooster's shrill automowhoop, 

While he who plays golf will rejoice at the call 

Of the automocaddy who chases his ball. 

The automocamel will soon, lead the van, 

From Automosheba to Automodan, 

And down in the kitchen, by hook or by crook, 

Some day we'll rejoice in an automocook, 

Who more than a week in the household will stop 

To joy in the jests of the automocop. 

Yes, it's motors by day and it's motors by night; 

Wherever we look there's a motor in sight. 

All over the land they are quite the fromage 

And every old barn has become a garage! 

— H. D. Gastitt. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 J2. 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan ". 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1. 00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1-75 

Century 4.00 3.S5 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have heen termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 







IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTEE FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



B«SSett'SSC»pBooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OP THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
m l?V °2 r ra o eS :_ f ^ an inch ' Re Peat, if unchanged, gl.00 aninch 
*r? U tered ^ S ^ ec °A nd , C1 ^ s Ma "er, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ««owu 

Vol. 8. No. 2 APRIL, 1910 5 Cents 



LOYALTY. 

How dear to our heart is the loyal League member 

Who pays his dues promptly when starts a new year, 
Who lays down his money and offers it gladly 

And casts round the office a halo of cheer. 
Who never says, "What do I get for my dollar?" 

But tells us he'll stay with us clear to the end. 
Who reads every word that he finds in the Scrap Book, 

And says, "Keep it up and continue to send." 
How welcome is he when he comes to the sanctum, 

And brings us a message of love and good cheer. 
We outwardly thank him — we inwardly bless him — 

The loyal League member who pays every year. 



THOUGHTS TURN LIGHTLY. 

Tennyson puts it: "In the spring a livelier iris 
changes on the burnished dove; In the spring a 
young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love." 



The early days of spring are here, when roads are 
worst of all the year, and mud now fills us with dis- 
gust where later we'll be filled with dust. 



Society is taking to the bicycle again, but very 
quietly. At Palm Beach there is a cycle livery that 
is well patronized and at all the winter resorts in 



18 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

Florida aristocracy rides where it can be "Far from 
the madding crowd." 



In the spring the wheelman's fancy lightly turns 
to wheeling joys; In the spring he wants the open, 
wants to get out with the boys. 



Making good roads with sawdust is being prac- 
ticed in a number of localities in the South. Two 
ridges of earth are thrown up (a road machine being 
required to do the work) at a certain width from 
each other, the space between being filled with a 
six-inch bed of sawdust. Dirt is then mixed in the 
sawdust, and it is claimed that heavily loaded 
vehicles in passing over this kind of a road make no 
impression upon it. It is estimated that the cost of 
building is about $200 per mile. Some of these 
roads have lasted 25 years in Georgia and are still 
in good condition. 



"I never argue against a success," said Josh Bill- 
ings. "When I see a snaik stickin' his head out of 
a hole I bear off to one side and say that there hole 
belongs to that there snaik." 



The NYLAW met at Albany, N. Y., on Satur- 
day, March 19, and dined at Hotel Kenmore. There 
were present W. H. Hale, Chairman; L. P. Cowell, 
Secretary; W. M. Meserole, C. J. Obermayer, Milo 
M. Belding, Jr., Lucius H. Washburn, W. M. 
Thomas, Henry J. Wynn, J. C. Howard, Frank P. 
Share. Thomas T. Eckert, Jr., was elected a mem- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 19 

ber. It was a very jolly time. An automobile excur- 
sion was arranged for June. 



In the spring the Nylaw gathers while the birds 
are all in tune; In the spring we find them voting 
for an auto run in June. 



April laughed and threw a kiss, 
Then, afraid, it seemed amiss, 
Quick she dropped a shining tear 
And it straightway blossomed here; 
Seeing this she then threw more, 
Crying harder than before — 
A tear for every kiss she threw: 
For every tear a blossom grew, 
Till she, laughing, ran away 
And left her flowers all to May. 

— A. J. Grannis. 



Dr. T. M. C, of Garrison, N. Y., writes: "It may 
be of interest to some of the readers of the Scrap 
Book to learn that Richard Haklugh in 1580, in 
giving written instructions to Merchants of the 
Muscovic Company for the discovery of the North 
East Strait, recommended them to take certain Eng- 
lish manufactures as samples for the purposes of 
trade and among them are glazen eyes to ride with 
against dust. Thus is proved again the old saying 
that there's nothing new under the sun. I read your 
monthly Scrap Book with much pleasure and send 
this as a contribution." 



In the spring the wheelman's fancy turns towards 
his idle wheel; In the spring he cleans and brightens 
every bit of rusted steel. 



20 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

HULLO! 

When you see a man in woe, 
Walk right up and say "Hullo!" 
Say "Hullo!" and "How d' ye do? 
How's the world a-usin' you?" 
Slap the fellow on the back; 
Bring your hand down with a whack. 
Walk right up, and don't go slow; 
Grin an' shake, an' say "Hullo!" 

Is he clothed in rags? Oh, sho; 
Walk right up and say "Hullo!" 
Rags is but a cotton roll, 
Jest fer wrappin' up a soul; 
An' a soul is worth a true, 
Hale and hearty "How d' ye do?" 
Don't wait for the crowd to go, 
Walk right up and say "Hullo!" 

When big vessels meet, they say, 
They saloot an' sail away. 
Jest the same are you an' me, 
Lonesome ships upon a sea; 
Each one sailin' his own log, 
For a port behind the fog. 
Let your speakin' trumpet blow; 
Lift your horn and cry "Hullo!" 

Say "Hullo!" and "How d' ye do?" 

Other folks are good as you. 

Wen you leave your house of clay, 

Wanderin' in the far away; 

Wen you travel through the strange 

Country t' other side the range, 

Then the souls you've cheered will know 

Who you be, and say "Hullo!" 

— Sam Walter Foss. 



"No man can foretell the weather correctly," 
writes John Busby, "but I can hit it as well as any 



B^SSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 2i 

man on earth today." Then he adds that spring is 
here. What more could we ask? 



Massachusetts has her own little holiday this 
month and we are all very glad that Paul Revere 
took that ride and that Longfellow glorified it. 



Ten years ago, April, 1900, we bade farewell to 
Elliott's Magazine as the official organ and made a 
new contract with the publishers of the Cycling 
Gazette of Cleveland, O., for a monthly periodical 
to be called "The L. A. W. Magazine," which was 
first issued in June of that year. They say that time 
fiies, but it would seem to have been flying a long 
while to cover the ten years and to have looked 
upon very much that was interesting. 



Gold reflectors for automobile lamps is the latest. 
The chief advantages claimed for the goldrplated 
mirrors are that the light beams reflected from them 
have greater penetrative powers through foggy at- 
mospheres than silvered reflectors, and that the 
objects revealed by the rays of a golden beam retain 
more nearly their original hue, and hence are the 
more readily distinguished. 



Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Elliott sailed for England 
in the Megantic, Tuesday, March 29. A business 
trip, but any fun that comes along will not be pushed 
aside. Elliott tried to find a steamer with a wooden 
wheel, but he gave up in despair. 



The bicycle aeroplane fever has reached Cali- 
fornia. William Bodle and Charles Reamv, described 



22 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

as two well known young business men of San An- 
selmo, claim they have invented the cycle or aero- 
plane which will solve the long sought problem. The 
invention resembles a bicycle, except that it has two 
large wings at the side and a propeller and balanc- 
ing plane in the rear. So far as known the contriv- 
ance has not yet left the ground. 



The Newton Bicycle Club had a run to Newton- 
ville on April 9, where at the hospitable home of 
Herbert A. Fuller they found pleasurable and gas- 
tronomic entertainment, and held the regular spring 
meeting. 



In the spring the member's fancy lightly turns to 
what is due; In the spring he sends his dollar — say 
does this apply to you? 



To H. E. T. — The Cumberland Road, or National 
Highway, as it is sometimes called, connected the 
District of Columbia with the Ohio River. Com- 
menced in 1806, and built at a cost of $1,800,000, it 
was the first internal improvement of any magnitude 
undertaken at public expense. Before the close of 
the year 1831 over $200,000 had been expended upon 
it in repairs. The road ran from a point nearly 
opposite Steubenville, O., and Wheeling, in West 
Virginia, through Ohio and Allegheny counties to 
Cumberland, thence through Cumberland and Wash- 
ington counties and in Frederick county to Freder- 
ickton, all in Maryland. Connecting there was a 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 23 

road that led to Baltimore and one that led to Wash- 
ington, D. C. The national road had a uniform 
width of 80 feet and was afterwards extended west- 
ward from the Ohio River to Indianapolis. 



TO MY BICYCLE. 



Visions of Wonderland rise from the heart of you, 

Love, O my love of the heather and pine; 
Poetry thrills in the tiniest part of you, 
Bicycle mine. 

Springtide already is here at the thought of you, 
First love and true love, my guide and my friend. 
O the romances and wonderings caught of you, 
Worlds without end! 

Oft have we revelled in sudden vicissitude, 
Patching a quarrel or healing a scratch, 
Objects together of rustic solicitude, 
Wanting a match! 

Unguent of rhyme would I willingly rain on you, 

Like as the prophets their chosen anoint, 
Were not adjusting and oiling the- chain on you 
More to the point. 

— A. W., in London Chronicle. 



It is said the average man eats 1,000 pounds of 
food a year. Nobody has figured what the average 
boy eats, but it must be considerably more than 
1,000 pounds. 



Forty surviving members of the old Brooklyn 
Bicycle Club held their second annual reunion and 
dinner at the Hotel Imperial, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sat- 



24 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

urday night, March 5. Before it went out of exist- 
ence about ten years ago the club boasted of a big 
membership and a handsome club house in South 
Elliott Place. The first annual reunion was held last 
year and it was such a success that it was voted to 
repeat it each year. James Thompson, one of the 
club's last presidents, was the toastmaster. This is 
the club that made Potter famous and gave Ray- 
mond to the Racing Board. 



A Chicago minister declares there will be no men 
in heaven. But let no woman be discouraged. He 
may be mistaken. 



The swindler isn't exactly a philanthropist, but he 
is always looking for the good things he can do. 



We have had complaint that the Boston & Maine 
R. R. illegally charges a fee for carrying bicycles. 
The expected has happened. Thus far complaint 
has been made by those who say, "I once belonged 
to the L. A. W." We are waiting to hear from some 
one who has stood by the organization. 



Frederick G. Wiese, No. 53. — Wm. S. Ginglen of 
Bordentown, N. J., writes: — 

"It is with regret that I write to advise you of 
the death of one of the Old Guard. Frederick G. 
Wiese died on March 7th in his 71st year, after a 
very active life. He was stricken on the street with 
paralysis on March the 4th and died on the 7th. He 
joined the L. A. W. June 16, 1882, was one of the 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 25 

organizers of the Owl Bicycle Club on July 10, 1882, 
and was for many years its Captain. He remained 
an active wheelman up to the last. He served as 
Postmaster under both Cleveland administrations 
and at the time of his death was District Superin- 
tendent of the Home Telephone Co." 

We don't recall ever meeting the deceased, but 
we have had from him many pleasant letters. With 
every renewal came from him a message of encour- 
agement and good cheer. Such things make life well 
worth living. 



Frederick Alcott Pratt, son of John Bridge and 
Anna Bronson Alcott Pratt and League Member No. 
70, died at Concord, Mass., March 10, 1910. He 
was in the early days a member of the Massachu- 
setts Bicycle Club, and an enthusiastic wheelman 
always. We like to think of him as "Demi" of "Lit- 
tle Men," for it was he who stood as the prototype 
of John's son in the mind of Louisa M. Alcott when 
she drew John and Meg's son, "Little John." He 
was a whole-souled and altogether delightful man, 
an enthusiast in everything he went into and a friend 
to everybody. He was with Roberts Bros., who 
published Miss xAlcott's books, for many years. An 
unfortunate experience in the automobile business 
overtook him a few years ago and since that time 
he has lived in retirement at Concord. In him we 
lose one of the good fellows who made wheeling 
delightful in the old days. 



In the Spring. — In the spring the good wife's 



26 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

fancy lightly turns to cleaning house; in the spring 
the good man finds it hard to satisfy his spouse. 
Did you ever read Clifton Johnson's "Book of Coun- 
try Clouds and Sunshine"? Perhaps some of the 
things will come home to you: 

"Mrs. Farmer's mind has been running on house- 
cleaning for some time past. ... Mr. Farmer suc- 
cumbs to persuasion and mild invective, and finds 
himself compelled to make up a bucket of white- 
wash. For two or three days he spends his spare 
time flourishing a broad brush, wherewith he gives 
the ceilings of all the rooms of the house a coating 
that is declared to make the apartments look much 
better, besides being healthy. 

"Meanwhile Mrs. Farmer and her daughter are 
attacking the rooms, one by one, turning closets 
inside out and everything else upside down, reveling 
in soapsuds, and leaving no crack or crevice un- 
touched in the energy of their campaign. Carpets 
are torn up and thrown out of the windows, and the 
men-folks are expected to swing them over a rope 
strung high in air between two convenient trees and 
give them a beating. The children enjoy taking a 
hand in this beating, and will ply the long apple-tree 
twigs or the horsewhip with vigor for a time, and 
take great delight in the puffs of dust which every 
blow starts; but they have not the strength to keep 
up the work for such a length of time as is deemed 
necessary, and they tire of the dust as well as of the 
labor. Someone older finishes the job, and is always 
astonished at the amount of dust a carpet can con- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 27 

tain, and is heartily thankful, by the time he has fin- 
ished, that house-cleaning comes but once a year. 
To be sure there is some pretty vigorous skirmish- 
ing with soapsuds and scrubbing brushes in the fall, 
but the upheaval stops short of carpets. After the 
carpet is cleaned the men-folks are invited to help 
put it down. The problem as to whether it is worn 
so it ought to be turned is discussed and decided, 
darning or patching done if necessary, and then 
those engaged crawl around on hands and knees in 
an endeavor to make the carpet fit snugly and tack 
it there. For some days after the affray, evidence of 
it may be found in the stray tacks which one is liable 
to encounter, with more or less pain or pleasure, 
anywhere and at any time. While this spring reno- 
vating is under way one often feels like a stranger 
and intruder in his own home." 



THE VILLAGE PROCRASTINATOR. 

Somewhere along in '93 

Jed Wheeler come an' said to me, 

"Ezekiel, I'm goin' to buy 

A bicycle." "Git out!" says I. 

"It's true," said Jed, with tilted head, 

"A reg'lar bicycle," says Jed. 

Then Jed took on a knowin' air, 
An' raised his hat frum off his hair, 
An' wiped his Dan'l Webster brow, 
An' says: "But I don't buy it now. 
No, sir; not now," says Jed, "I swow, 
They'll be much cheaper year from now. 1 
An' that was long in '93 
That Jed made that remark to me. 



28 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

In '94 I spoke to Jed 
About his bicycle; he said 
That he'd foun' by lookin' roun' 
That wheels was surely comin' down. 
An' that he'd wait a year or so, 
Till they hed dropped down purty low. 
"Oh, yes," said Jed, with tilted head, 
"Great scheme fer savin' cash," he said. 

Waal, '95 an' '96 went by, 

An' bicycles Warn't nigh so high. 

I met Jed down to Jones' store 

An' asked him. as I'd done before, 

Ef he hed got his wheel ez yit, 

Or what kind he was like to git. 

Then Jed took on a wise-like grin, 

An' scratched the stubble on his chin, 

An' hemmed an' hawed, an' shet one eye 

An' says, "I'll git one by and bye." 

Says Jed, "Thye're droppin' three or four 

Dollars per year, an' some years more; 

I'm savin' that much, don't you see, 

Which is good interest fer me. 

I'll walk aroun' this blamed ol' town 

Another year an' salt it down." 

An' so he walked, two years, at least. 

The while the price of wheels decreased. 

In 1900 once again 

I met ol' Jed upon the train. 

"Why don't you ride your wheel?", says I, 

An' Jed he kinder closed one eye 

An' says, quite conferdential-like: 

"The reason I ain't bought no bike 

Is jest becuz I'm waitin' till 

They git a little cheaper still. 

"Why, man," says he — "why, don't you see 

I'm makin' money? Course I be." 

A year or two or more went by. 
An' Jed, still squintin' up one eye. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 29 

Walked back an' forth from home to town 
While bicycles kept comin' down. 
"Oh, no," says Jed, with shake of head, 
"I'll walk an' save my cash instead. 
I'll walk an' use my weather eye; 
They'll git down cheaper by an' by." 

An' that was back in '93 
That Jed talked bicycle to me; 
He's talked about it ever sence, 
An' still kept straddle of the fence. 
"Oh, no," says he, "you can't fool me; 
I know what I'm about," says he. 
An' so he walked, an' by degrees 
Poor Jed got the foot disease. 

Says he, "I vow, it's high time now 

I bought a bicycle, I swow!" 

So t'other day he sent away 

To git his wheel. But, strange to say, 

Afore he got aroun' to ride 

Jed took a turn, an' up and died. 

— Joe Cone, in Century Magazine. 



M. S. T. writes: "I am sending you five dollars. 
Keep my membership alive for five years and send 
me ticket each year. I prefer this way to taking a 
life membership, for I feel that a life member is like 
one laid on the shelf. I want the yearly reminder 
that we still live and I don't want to go way back 
and sit down in the life members' row. Perhaps you 
think I am queer in this. So I am. I always was 
queer and I always will be. I like the life that is in 
a yearly member and I dislike the deadness of a life 
member." 



When Halley, just before his death, foretold his 
comet would appear in 1758, as it did, they said he 



30 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

"prophesied truly." In these knowing days we real- 
ize his "prophecy" was pure calculation, while com- 
ets are recognized as being merely harmless, fuzzy 
things. Scientific discovery knocks the stuffing out 
of man's dearest terrors, and it is a pity, for life was 
more amusing when he did not know so much. 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Charles J. Obermayer, Esq., President Greater New 
York Savings Bank, 498 Fifth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
George L. Cooke, Esq., Providence, R. I. 
Alonzo D. Peck, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Gentlemen: You are hereby notified that, acting under 
the provisions of the Constitution, I have appointed you as 
a Committee to make nominations for national officers to 
be voted for at the next Annual Election, and will ask the 
first named gentleman to act as Chairman and to com- 
municate with the others as to matters of procedure. 
Yours fraternally, 

Walter M. Meserole, 

President. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., March 22, 1910. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 400 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1.00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century 4.00 3.85 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 275 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 



i||i|gHj|p^ 

|H9f ^ 



REGULAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columhia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOR 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



B«SSett*S Scrap BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 81.00 an inch! 

Entered L as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ^ uu 

Vol. 8. No. 3 MAY, 1910 5 Cents 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Oh, here's a rose for every grave 

In which a soldier's sleeping; 
And may our flag forever wave, 

It's sacred vigil keeping. 
And here's a wreath of roses for 

Each nobler man and brother 
Who reasons men away from war 

To peace with one another. 



MAY BE? IT IS! 



Good roads are made — not born. 



Never put off till tomorrow the renewal that's due 
today. 



Oh we don't care so much for the heat and the 
dirt, when we wear a "trash" suit and a "negligent" 
shirt. 



"I see my finish," said the wheel as the man picked 
it up to dip in the enamel. 



The C. T. C. has issued the British and Irish 
Handbook for 1910. It contains the Consul, Hotel 



34 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

and Farmhouse lists and is invaluable to the tourist 
in Great Britain. Our members can procure it for 
a shilling. 



Louis Rubenstein of Montreal has been re-elected 
President of the Canadian Wheelmen's Association. 
Mr. Rubenstein has been a member of the L. A. W. 
since 1883 and holds number 138. 



The Rovers' Cycle Club held its 24th annual 
dinner at the B. A. A., Boston, on the evening of 
April 1 8th. Thomas H. Hall, the President, pre- 
sided. There was a concerted verse production by 
the firm of Kilby and Bassett and the output seemed 
to go very well. Mr. Daniels, the entertainer, pro- 
vided songs and recitations and Mr. Burbeck spoke 
for the departed ones. It was a most notable occa- 
sion. Mr. Hall was re-elected President and plans 
were set on foot for an especially fine celebration of 
the 25th anniversary next year. 



The Boston Bi-Club held its four hundred and 
fifty-third called run on April 19th. First to Wood- 
land Park to see the Marathon run, and then to the 
"Robinson's" at Chestnut Hill, where open-house 
for wheelmen is kept every Patriots' Day. 



We think, perhaps, that we, or some one else said, 
recently: "Don't Give Up the Ship," and this may 
account for the many times this brief piece of advice 
has been sent to us the past month. All right, we 
sha'n't give up the ship till it gives us up and throws 
us overboard. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 400 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge . 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1. 00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century 4i00 3.S5 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3^50 

Lif e 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 



Munsey !. o 



95 



Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.7*5 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 







REGULAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Bassett'S SC»P BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-|L50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, §1.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. -dusmmi 

Vol. 8. No. 4 JUNE, 1910 5 Cents 



GLAD TO SEE YOU. 

Laws a mussy, walk right in, 

Glad ter see ye, June. 
Take yer bunnit off an' set; 

Hain't come none too soon. 

Haven't seen ye fer a year, 
Knowed ye on the spot, 

Hope ye fetched yer roses 'long- 
May, she most fergot. 

Sakes alive, yer lookin' fine! 

Mighty glad ye come, 
Everything ye see is yourn, 

Make yerself to hum! 



THE LAWN MOWER ORCHESTRA IS NOW 
PLAYING THE FULL SCORE. 



It is better to be hungry all of the time than never 
be hungry any of the time. 



Keeping up with the procession isn't quite 
enough; you want the procession to get into your 
step. 



A St. Louis, Mo., man at ioo years of age smokes. 



50 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

chews, drinks, takes snuff and swears. Only another 
way of putting the truth that "the good die young." 



Easy street, however, is neither the happiest nor 
the healthiest street in the world. — Puck. Yet 
everybody is walking up and down looking for a 
rent. 



If you are not dead sure when you are licked, 
doubtless the other fellow can tell you. 



Proof isn't required that baseball is shortening as 
well as otherwise changing the English language. A 
small boy, when asked by a near-sighted gentleman 
for the score, replied: "Nix nix end of the six." 



The C. T. C. is issuing accident policies on very 
easy terms to its members, is. 6d. paid gives a 
death by accident payment of $500; is. gives $100. 
Too much law for that sort of thing over here. We 
tried it once and our Secretary came very near to 
being jailed. Too much law is a good bait for so- 
cialists to angle with. 



A Perth (Ehg.) bicycle dealer has utilized a dog 
as a "sandwich" to attract attention to his business. 
A white-haired terrier sits all day in front of the 
door, a card from the collar bearing the following: 
"Dear Friend, I am dumb, but our cycles speak for 
themselves. Bow-wow-wow!" 



How will the coming generation get their phys- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

ical exercise in outdoor recreations? The i» 
cycle has played hob with the bicycle, and the> pow 
boat has the sailing boat and the oarsmen on the 
run. A tiny motor now pushes the light Indian 
canoe over the shallow lakes and streams, and for 
some the paddle is too strenuous or too slow. Shall 
we next see the pedestrian tuck a motor in his 
pocket and get over the ground without the labor 

of moving his feet? 

■ 

One difference between a beautiful girl and a cod- 
fish is that the former may become a fall bride and 
the latter a ball fried. 



A former Bostonian returned unexpectedly, on 
account of the comet, thus explains his appearance 
at the Hub: "I came to town this morning, in recol- 
lection of the reply of Wendell Phillips to the Miller- 
ites who called to him when he was riding in from 
Concord, 'Mr. Phillips! Stop! Come join us! We are 
collected in this field because the world is coming to 
an end this afternoon.' 'That. doesn't concern me,' 
answered Phillips, T live in Boston.' " 



First Bicycle Tour — Once more we have before 
us the mooted question of the first American bicycle 
tour. First of all, what is a tour? The dictionaries 
tell us that a perfect tour is one where a person goes 
on a roving journey and comes back to the place of 
starting. A ride to get somewhere and stay there 
is not a tour. One man, can tour as well as many. 
Suppose we look at the records of early days. 



^ASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

xarch, 1878, Will R. Pitman, being in Haver- 
■, Mass., announced his intention of riding on a 
wheel to Boston. It was an extraordinary feat and 
the newspapers made much of it. Crowds greeted 
him along the route, the Boston Bi Club rode out 
to meet him and escorted him to Hotel Brunswick. 
Started at 12.30 p. m.; arrived at 6.10 p. m.; 40 miles. 

The next month, April, 1878, Mr. Pitman rode all 
the way from Fitchburg to Boston, 57 miles. 

May 25, 1878, took place what has been called the 
first overnight run. Charles E. Pratt, editor of the 
Bicycling World, and Edward C. Hodges, financial 
backer of the paper, rode to West Boylston, Mass., 
50 miles, and returned the next day. Their purpose 
was to study roads and routes for future publication 
in the paper. 

July 3, 1879, Wentworth Rollins of New York 
City, a dealer in cycling goods, made a business trip 
to Albany which took 5 days, 190 miles. He re- 
mained at Albany until August 2, when he started 
awheel for Chicago. He made many stops on the 
way and arrived at Chicago September 27. 

July 7, 1879, came what has been called the first 
American bicycle tour. William E. Gilman of 
Chelsea, later editor of the Bicycling World, and 
Darius Hadley, a school master at Everett, . made 
plans for a bicycle tour to and through the White 
Mountains. Two friends, horseback riders, joined 
them and this involved taking along an "ambu- 
lance" for the luggage and tent. This was driven by 
Eli Veazie of Chelsea. The party went by boat to 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 53 

Portland, rode over the road to Gorham, N. H., 
where they went into camp. Frequent trips awheel 
were made to Mt. Washington, to Crawford Notch 
and to other points of interest. They found the val- 
ley roads in good condition for riding and the hills 
not frequent nor steep. The wheelmen rode home 
over the road and the horsemen returned to Port- 
land where they took the boat for Boston. The 
whole trip was of three weeks' duration. 

The claim that this was the first American bicycle 
tour has been challenged because the horsemen 
went along and this made it a "mixed" tour. But 
two men in a buggy went on the first wheel About 
the Hub; men on bicycles went with the famous 
North Shore tricycle tours, etc., etc. The fact re- 
mains that this tour revealed the fact that the White 
Mountain section had roads well adapted for touring 
awheel and corrected the impression that the high 
hills and rough roads forbade wheeling. The two 
wheelmen collected a deal of information regarding 
routes and roads and this proved valuable to future 
tourists and sent many wheelmen into the White 
Hill section. They demonstrated that horsemen and 
wheelmen had better not travel in company and so 
announced. 

The rival claimant to the above is a tour made in 
the following month, Aug. 13, 1879. Charles E. 
Pratt, Edward W. Pope and Winfield S. Slocum 
started from Boston to ride to Portland, Me. They 
made a leisurely journey and arrived at their desti- 
nation on the evening of the 16th, 150 miles. They 



54 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

returned to Boston by boat. Reported cost of trip 
$11.50 each. 

Oct. 2, 1879, Max Hansman and H. M. Sehooley 
of the Capital Club, Washington, D. C, rode to 
Boston from Washington and arrived October 14. 

One of the earliest long tours came in 1886 when 
Charles M. Fairchild, now of Chicago, A. M. Hill 
and Harry W. Fairfax rode from New Orleans to 
attend the Boston Meet, taking a touring speed all 
the way. 

We have submitted a fine collection of early rides, 
runs and tours, and we leave it to our Scrappers to 
select the earliest, the best and the most creditable. 



Miss Marie de Ford Keller of Baltimore, Md., has 
just completed a portrait of the late Conway W. 
Sams, former judge of the Supreme Bench of Balti- 
more. The portrait will be hung in the Superior 
Court room of the Courthouse. The portrait was 
painted entirely from photographs and is a very fine 
likeness of the original. Conway Whittle Sams was 
President of the L. A. W. in 1900 and before that 
was Chief Consul of the Maryland Division and 
Chairman of the National Committee on Rights and 
Privileges. Joined the League in May, 1895, and 
was Life Member No. 46. Born in South Carolina 
in 1862; the family went to Baltimore in 1878; took 
a college course and was admitted to bar in 1886. 
He was a man of strong personality and was held in 
high esteem by those who had dealings with him. 
To many of us this is a loss we feel very deeply. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 55 

The Century Road Club of America have ar- 
ranged for a cycle tour to Bermuda. The tourists 
will leave New York on the steamer Trent July 23. 
Five days on the island. Arrive at New York 
August 1. 



We are asked for the highest number given out 
by the L. A. W. Dec. 31, 1902, the number 155,130 
was given out to a New York man no longer with 
us. That's the topper. New numbers given out 
Jan. 1, 1903. 



Massachusetts says "No!" to the proposed law re- 
quiring all vehicles to carry lights. Whether or not 
a bicycle should carry a light is a disputed question 
among wheelmen, many of whom have opposed car- 
rying lamps while other vehicles travel in the dark; 
but we can well believe that wheelmen will never 
oppose a bill that will require every vehicle to be so 
provided. They don't have to. The farmers will at- 
tend to that. 



If we all go back to* the farm, as some claim we 
must, we will have a great big party to oppose prog- 
ress in road building and travel things. 



The Veteran Wheelmen's Association, which was 
formed in 1908 to foster the spirit and preserve the 
associations formed during the old cycling days in 
Philadelphia, Pa., held its second annual meeting 
and reunion in the Quaker City, Friday night, April 
29. The meeting was well attended, 155 members 



56 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

and invited guests taking part in the festivities. 
After the banquet there were speeches by some of 
the leading figures in Philadelphia's cycling affairs 
many years ago. Nearly all the speakers expressed 
their continued interest in the sport. Among the 
speakers were O. S. Bunnell, Thomas Hare and 
Jerry Diehl. 

In the choosing of officers for the ensuing year 
Thomas Hare was re-elected president and C. A. 
Dimon vice-president. Samuel C. Eaton succeeds 
Joseph Estocelet as secretary and Walter Gilbert is 
the new treasurer. The executive board will con- 
sist of M. J. Costa, A. H. Allen and H. T. Uhler. 
The matter of the annual bicycle run was left to the 
decision of the executive board. 

Of the old clubs that formerly composed the As- 
sociated Cycling Clubs of Philadelphia, the follow- 
ing were represented: Park Avenue, Century, 
Quaker City, Time; South End, Tioga, and Key- 
stone Wheelmen, the Pennsylvania Bicycle Club and 
the Turner Cyclers. The membership of the veteran 
association is restricted to the former members of 
the Associated Cycling Clubs of Philadelphia, to 
members of the L. A. W. who date back to 1898, 
and to anyone notable in Philadelphia cycledom. 



J. C. T., of New York writes: — "I have been won- 
dering what I shall do. Well, first of all put me 
square on the League books. I have become ter- 
ribly bored. I have no books and no internal re- 
sources. I cannot draw, and if I could there's noth- 
ing that I want to sketch. I don't play the flute, and 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 57 

if I did there's nobody that I should like to have 
listen to me. I never wrote a tragedy, but I think I 
am in that state of mind in which tragedies are writ- 
ten. Anything lighter is out of the question. I 
whistle four hours a day, yawn five, smoke six, and 
sleep the rest of the twenty-four, with a running ac- 
companiment of swearing to all these occupations 
except the last, and I'm not quite sure that I don't 
sometimes swear in my dreams. I am getting des- 
perate for something to do. Happy thought! Take 
my wheel and ride it off. Good! I'll do it." 



M. T. S. writes: — "It was not my intention, in a 
former letter, to asperse the life members. Some of 
my dearest friends have taken out life memberships 
and I cannot doubt they did so from the most loyal 
motives, and that they gave the L. A. W. a lift when 
they came forward with their ten spots; but I have- 
never believed in life membership. It is now twenty- 
five years since the first life list was started and ac- 
cording to the Scrap Book for January there are 
thirty-nine of this list now on the roll. They each 
paid $10. I was one of those who in that day re- 
fused to take out a life membership. I have paid 
$25 already and intend to pay"a dollar each year as 
long as I live. The new list of life members has 
been running nine years. The greater portion of 
the money paid went to the divisions and now the 
National body has to carry this tremendous load of 
non-payers and give them a magazine. It's a good 
thing for the member who can put up his ten and 
then go back and sit down, but I cannot believe it a 



58 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

good thing for the L. A. W. I hope ex-President 
Earle will appreciate my standpoint." 



A. T. Jones of Philadelphia writes : — "Enclosed 
please find one dollar for which send me ticket of 
membership in the good old League, God bless it! 
I certainly do love the League and my wheel since 
the car strike in Philadelphia. It looks like old 
times with so many wheels on the street. I would 
like to see the wheelmen of this city get together 
and form one large club. Now can you tell me who 
has the charge of the wheelmens' interest in the 
city. There are enough riders here to make a big 
showing. Can you bring it to bear on their mind?". 



Another club looking forward to the silver anni- 
versary. The 24th annual meeting of the Roxbury 
Bicycle Club was held at the Quincy House April 2, 
only one member being absent. W. H. Proudman 
was elected President. After business meeting din- 
ner was served, which was followed by songs and 
recitations. All are looking forward to the 25th an- 
niversary next year. We are all glad they have been 
and are still to be. They ought to have a good 
silver jubilee. 



Always glad to hear from Owen Lawson who 
lives in Kentucky: — "I had delayed sending this one 
spot under the vain delusion that the comet might 
annihilate this mundane pellet and make the pay- 
ment unnecessary, or impossible, except in asbestos 
currency or interplanetary exchange, neither of 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 59 

which circulates in this community. Now that the 
comet has failed in the performance of this minor 
detail of its duty I suppose I shall have to continue 
to comply with your annual demands until the celes- 
tial hobo appears again, when it may bump us into 
universal bankruptcy and thus afford us an honor- 
able reason for repudiating legitimate obligations. 
By that time the L. A. W. may be strong enough to 
defy Brer Halley's sinuous curves and even swat 
him for a home run." 



The rupture between the Amateur Athletic Asso- 
ciation and the National Cyclists' Union is being 
taken quite seriously by athletes in England. The 
athletic association has sent a circular letter to rac- 
ing cyclists informing them that the association in- 
tends to promote and foster amateur cycling with- 
out over-legislation, and with that view the rules and 
regulations will be as simple as possible. 
• No licenses will be required to cycle under A. A. 
A. laws. The National Cycling Union, in a state- 
ment, says it is willing, as it always has been, to 
work in harmony with the governing body of other 
sports. It calls attention to the fact that it was the 
first body organized in England for the management 
and control of racing. It has nearly 1,200 clubs 
affiliated with it. The rules of the union have been 
framed by cyclists, the majority of whom have raced 
themselves on the track and for years have been in- 
timately connected with the sport. All the promi- 
nent racing men and the rank and file of racing 
cyclists (a few inevitable malcontents excepted) have 



60 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

signified their intention of competing only under the 
rules of their own organization, the National Cy- 
clists' Union. The N. C. U. has no wish or desire to 
control or interfere in the slightest degree with foot 
racing or any sport excepting cycling. 



R. J. Mecredy, editor of the Irish Cyclist, is about 
to issue a book called "Health's Highway." It is 
no scientific treatise on the subject, but a simple, 
plain-spoken description of a manner of life which, 
if followed, can only result in great good. The 
author does not make any claim to have solved an 
issue which has occupied the attention of far more 
learned minds than his; but "Health's Highway," as 
the name implies, lays the foundations upon which 
the weakly may at least walk to improved health 
conditions, and along which the fortunate ones who 
already possess health as an inherited gift may 
march along holding tight to their treasure. 

In "Health's Highway" the author's text for all he 
tries to teach is moderation, and yet he outlines a 
natural mode of living, involving neither difficulty 
nor hardship, which, he claims, if followed generally, 
would banish sickness and weakness, and render the 
generations which follow after us rich in health and 
its twin-sister, happiness. We believe Mr. Mecredy 
sleeps in a tent all the year round, and merely uses 
a very comfortable house as a sort of annex thereto, 
but possibly we are under a misunderstanding in this 
respect. We do know that he is still a marvel of 
juvenility and vigor, and if he can teach others how 
to prolong youth into middle age, he will indeed 
prove himself a benefactor to the race. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 61 

We are told the latest version of that verse of 
wisdom is: "Early to bed, early to rise, but you 
won't meet any prominent people." 



NOMINATIONS. 



In accordance with Article 4, Section 2, of the by-laws of 
the League of American Wheelmen, and by virtue of the 
authority vested in the undersigned, a committee on nom- 
ination appointed by the President, March 22, 1910, to make 
nominations for the ensuing year, the following named gen- 
tlemen are nominated for the respective offices set oppo- 
site their names: Fred. Atwater, Bridgeport, Conn., 
President; Quincy Kilby, Boston, Mass., 1st Vice Presi- 
dent; Jarvis C. Howard. New Rochelle, N. Y., 2d Vice 
President; Abbot Bassett, Boston, Mass., Secretary and 
Treasurer; George W. Nash, Abington, Mass., Auditor. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. J. Obermayer, 
Alonzo D. Peck, 
George L. Cooke. 

May 17, 1910. 

Further steps in the election will take place under the 
following Article of the Constitution: 

Article IV ; Section 1. — The officers of the League shall 
be a President, First and Second Vice Presidents, a Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, and an Auditor, to be elected as herein- 
after provided. 

Section 1. — Not later than April 1 in each year the Presi- 
dent shall appoint a Nominating Committee of three, which 
shall report, not later than June 1, a list of candidates for 
the elective offices. This list shall be published in the 
official organ of June 15. Any five members of the League 
may nominate additional candidates by filing a certificate 
to that effect with the Secretary-Treasurer not later than 
July 1. All names placed in nomination shall be printed on 
a ballot and sent to each member of the Assembly at the 
time of sending the official notification of the meeting. 
Each member shall express his preference by marking the 
ballot as per instructions thereupon, signing the same and 
sending it to the Secretary-Treasurer; provided, however, 



62 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

that any member who attends the meeting may present his 
vote in person. The votes shall be canvassed during the 
meeting of the Assembly by a special committee appointed 
by the President. The candidates having the highest num- 
ber of votes shall be declared elected and shall take office 
at the close of the annual Meeting. 



TOWN AND COUNTRY. 

Oh, the patter of the rain 

On the roof and window pane 
(You have never read a poem just like this'n) 

Is so sweet a slumber song 

That to miss it would be wrong, 
So you have to lie awake all night and listen. 

Which reminds me that in town 

All the noisy noises drown 
Every sound so fully that it doesn't matter, 

While the country is so still 

Sounds all sound so clear and shrill 
That it's hard for one to sleep amid the clatter. 

— Nixon Waterman. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 400 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1.00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century 4.00 3 g 5 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 



3.50 
500 4.50 



Life 

Literary Digest (new) 5-0° 2.60 

95 



Munsey loo 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 







BHGULAR IMPKOVBD 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in an sizes and threads. Send 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc.. Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOR 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



B«SSett*S SC«p Book 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-<*las<* 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anytninj useful to 
men. Our rates :-$l 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 01.00 aninch? 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ' J5U&1 ' 011 

Vol. 8. No. 5 JULY, 1910 5 Cents 

Y IS THE FOURTH OF JULY. 

NOW DO JUST WHAT 

JULYK TO. 



A silver dollar isn't very heavy, but some men find 
it difficult to raise. 



When a woman expresses a wish the charges are 
seldom prepaid. 



The man who would win success hasn't much time 
to stop and pick flowers by the way. 



A critic is a man who isn't satisfied to hit the nail 
on the head. He wants to hit the. fellow who is 
driving the nail. 



"He was driven to drink." 

"Poor fellow!" 

"Yes; his horse could find the saloon every time." 



Now goodbye to the girl who skates, give us the 
girl that swims. 



66 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

We hear a good deal about the extravagant wages 
paid to chauffeurs and we wonder if there will be 
many applicants for the position of chauffeur for the 
chief of the Boston Fire Department. Salary- $1.75 
per day — seven days per week. Applicants must 
hold license as chauffeur, and pass an examination 
in telegraphy, and the care and driving of horses. 



The following resolution was adopted at a recent 
meeting of the St. Louis Cycling Club: "That at ev- 
ery Sunday dinner a tax of five cents be levied to be 
contributed toward any movement for the better- 
ment of the roads in the vicinity of the eating station. 
That the treasurer keep a separate accounting of 
this road fund. That no appropriation be made from 
the fund except upon sanction of the executive com- 
mittee:" 



Waiter — Sorry, sir, but we are entirely out of 
bread. 

O'Brien — Then yez may bring me an order av 
toast. 



Why go without an umbrella or annex the other 
fellow's when you can buy a new one at the five-and- 
ten-cent stores for a dime? Over in New York 
awhile ago a man went into a store and asked the 
proprietor. "Say, are those 50-cent umbrellas you 
are selling really any good?" "Well," said the store 
man candidly, "They're all right to stop a car with." 



"Following the farewells to the senior houses, the 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 67 

merry seniors gathered about a large campfire on 
the campus, and as the toastmaster passed around a 
large loving cup, they cast into the flames their 
books and other school paraphernalia of the closing 
year." Any education that does not inspire in a girl 
such a love and respect for books as would make any 
such thoughtless sacrifice impossible is a wretched 
failure. 



"Delightful reception. Who is that tall gentleman 
talking with our hostess?" 

"That's Grey the famous bridge expert." 
"Indeed — iron, whist, or dental?" 



A young girl should remember that it isn't rings 
that make the belle. 



From the present indications there will be a 
bicycle race in addition to the other athletic features 
that have been arranged for the Century Road Club 
of America's first annual Bermuda cycle tour from 
July 23d to August 1st. The race doubtless will be 
made a 10 miles handicap, open to Bermuda riders 
as well as the tourists. 

The tourists will be distributed among the various 
leading hotels in Bermuda, while a number of those 
who ride bicycles will be quartered at the Frascatti, 
which is less than 10 minutes' ride from Hamilton. 

Secretary Fred E. Mommer states that those per- 
sons who have delayed booking reservations may 
find themselves disappointed if they wait much 



68 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

longer. The rooms are filling fast and from present 
indications all the available staterooms wall be taken. 

Charles E. Pratt, first President of the L. A. W., 
was, in 1882, President of the Boston Common 
Council. It followed, as per the custom in vogue, 
that a portrait of Mr. Pratt was hung in the Council 
Chamber upon his retirement from office in 1883. 
Now that Boston has a new charter with fewer ex- 
ecutive officers, a more restricted place of meeting 
has been chosen, and the many portraits could not 
be found place for. It was voted to send the por- 
traits to the families of the ex^officers. Mrs. Pratt's 
death followed very soon after that of his own, and 
the City Clerk of Boston has deposited the portrait 
with the L. A. W. to be hung at headquarters. It 
is now on the wall looking down upon the home of a 
membership about the same as that over which he 
presided in 1880. 



John S. Briggs of Rochester, N. Y., writes : — 
"I am enclosing, for the twenty-fifth time, my 
dollar for dues — more as a matter of sentiment and 
appreciation for what the L, A. W. has done, than 
for what it is doing, and can do for me now. Those 
golden days of 1885-86 when I was a student at Wil- 
braham, Mass., stealing away to Springfield to 
watch the slim, black-tighted Hendee clean things 
up as an amateur, or Jack Prince, the husky white 
clothed professional, whom I felt in my heart could 
only be beaten by any British pro. by a mischance, 
are still a bright spot in my life, and will long be 
remembered. Prince is making tracks for autos 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 69 

now, and Hendee, long since grown stout, I hear, 
is easing his and other legs by the means of motor- 
bikes. I, too, am allowing gasoline to help me 
along, now, on a motor bicycle, but still call myself 
a wheelman." 



TO MY BICYCLE. 



Sing me a song of the days to come 

When the balmy breeze will blow, 

And firmly set like a thing of life, 

Through the air we shall swiftly go. 

Lonely and covered with dust thou art, 

And thy plating waxeth dim, 

Last season's mud still clings to thy frame, 

There's rust on each polished rim; 

But now that the evenings longer grow, 

With loving and gentle care, 

I shall make thee shine 

Like a thing divine, 

And put thee in good repair. 

Then, when the soft spring breezes blow 

And the road winds long and grey, 

We two shall speed — 

Oh! my matchless steed, 

O'er the hills and far away. 

Then give me my tried and trusty bike, 

A lamp that is burning clear, 

Repairing outfit too, if you like, 

A pump — and we've naught to fear. 

Some love to roam o'er the rolling foam, 

And they sing of the "deep blue sea" — 

Well! as they like, 

But a well-tried bike 

And the smooth grey road for me. 

— James Gauld. 



Leonard D. Hunt of Exeter, N. H., writes: — 
"In sending my renewal to the L. A. W. for the 



70 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

up-keep of an especially fine organization for the 
owner of a bicycle, automobile, team or other means 
of locomotion over our roads, I feel like the man in 
the following that took place in Hartford some 
years ago. 

"A certain liquor proprietor having made quite 
a lot of money, built a fine new block which was 
quite an imposing structure, and many people 
stopped to admire it. 

"One morning Pat, an old and steady customer of 
the proprietor's sauntering along, stopped and be- 
gan counting with his arm outstretched the number 
of bricks in the front of the building. At last the 
proprietor ordered him away, but Pat wouldn't 
budge an inch, but kept on counting, and the pro- 
prietor at last asked him what he was doing. Pat 
after a while replied, 'Sir, I am trying to find out 
how many bricks in your building I paid for, but 
begorrah you've got me beat, for I can't tell how 
thick is the wall." 

"The L. A. W. has accomplished many things in 
the past, is doing them now and will continue to do 
them in the future, although to the thick-headed 
person, may be out of sight, but I have always be- 
lieved that every dollar we have spent for our 'brick' 
has returned good big interest, not only to ourselves 
but to the whole country, in building good roads, 
promoting one of the best things today in our coun- 
try, — that is Bicycling, which will benefit everyone 
who will take it up, whether for business or for 
pleasure." 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 71 

J. D. Chism, Jr., of Albany, one of our best work- 
ers, more then, when we had work to do, than now, 
when much of it is completed, writes: — 

"I don't intend to drop out of the L. A. W. so 
long as I can spare one dollar per annum. I love 
the memories of our conventions, our campaigns, 
our battles for our rights too well to ignore the 
efforts to keep alive the association. 

"The wheel cured me of over a dozen years of 
the most unspeakable indigestion and what the doc- 
tors determined was chronic dyspepsia. But less 
than three months' riding began to give me relief 
and today at 59, I am better than at 30, thanks to 
the wheel alone." 



Mr. Albert S. Parsons, elected Secretary of the 
L. A. W. at the time of its organization, 1880, at 
Newport, is now enjoying life behind the steering 
wheel of an auto. He writes: — 

"I enclose my check for one dollar, with pleasure, 
and be sure that as long as I have a dollar to give I 
shall continue my membership in the dear old 
League of American Wheelmen, not only to keep 
in touch with the present wheelmen, but in loving 
memory of those glorious days of my middle man- 
hood which brought back my youth and prolonged 
my life by the exercise, the exhilaration, the exulta- 
tion, the enthusiasm and the enjoyment which came 
upon the high wheel and in the companionship of its 
noble riders. 

"The only 'out' about the L. A. W. publication is 
that every number brings the death of one or more 



72 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

old friends, made on the wheel in the seventies and 
eighties. Alas, they are getting to be 'in the 70s and 
80s,' as I soon shall be. 

"I thank the Lord every day that I was born in 
time to enjoy the high wheel, and am still enjoying 
the low one,- — as well as my automobile." 



Judge Conway Whittle Sams. — In our last issue 
we made some mention of the death of Conway W. 
Sams, but gave no particulars. The item that we 
published came to us as a great surprise. We had 
not heard of the death and we were unable to get 
particulars before going to press. 

We learn that Judge Sams was taken sick while 
on a fishing trip. He left Baltimore Tuesday, Aug. 
17, 1909, and went to Rehoboth, where he antici- 
pated a few days of recreation. On Friday he be- 
came ill. Unfortunately, there were no physicians 
that could be reached, and he was therefore obliged 
to suffer until the following Sunday^ when he re- 
turned to Baltimore. Later he went to Atlantic 
City, where he died Sept. 5 of last year. 

Death was due to thrombosis, which is the result 
of clots forming in the heart or principal blood ves- 
sels. One of these, it is believed, broke off and 
lodged in one of the arteries, causing almost instant 
death. Up till the last few minutes the physicians 
were hopeful of saving the patient, as no complica- 
tions were expected, and there is no reason ordi- 
narily, it is said, why a complete recovery should not 
be made if the first trouble is passed. 

The Judge was not married. He leaves a father 
and two sisters. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 73 

Judge Sams' whole attitude of life and his feeling 
toward the work on the bench especially can be di- 
vined by the prayer which he recited every night 
before retiring: 

"Almighty God, the Giver of wisdom, without 
whose help resolutions are vain, without Whose 
blessing study is ineffectual, enable me, if it be Thy 
will, to attain such knowledge as may qualify me to 
direct the doubtful and instruct the ignorant, to pre- 
vent wrong and terminate contention and grant that 
I may use that knowledge which I shall obtain to 
Thy glory and my own salvation, for Jesus Christ's 
sake, Amen." 

The Judge had clipped this out of a paper many 
years ago and always treasured the clipping. 

A significant act was performed while he was suf- 
fering and anxious to get away somewhere to find 
relief. He remained in the city until he had ad- 
justed the insurance policy in favor of a little crip- 
pled child, whose grandfather had just died and for 
whose benefit he had paid for years the premium on 
the policy of her grandfather. 

Judge Sams was born in Chester, S. C, Jan. 22,. 
1862. He was the son of Rev. J. Julius Sams and 
Mrs. Mary Whittle Sams. His father was for many 
years pastor of Holy Trinity Protestant Episcopal 
Church, Baltimore, and Judge Sams always repre- 
sented that church at the diocesan conventions, tak- 
ing a great interest in the work of the church. 

He came to Baltimore at the age of 16 and entered 
the Carey School. Later he took a special course 
in the Johns Hopkins University and studied law at 
the University of Maryland, graduating in 1884. 



74 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Mr. Charles F. McKenney of Denver, Colo., 
passed away at his home May 26 last. He has been 
a loyal member of the L. A. W. since Sept. 11, 1884, 
and held number 167. He was a pioneer of Col- 
orado, a prominent mining man and one of the lead- 
ing citizens of Denver. 

Mr. McKenney was a life member of the Denver 
Athletic Club, belonged to the Masons and was a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He 
enlisted as a volunteer in the Fourth Regiment, New 
York Heavy Artillery, Jan. 4, 1864. He was an ex- 
pert accountant and for that reason was detailed to 
service at the national capital, where he remained 
during the entire period of his enlistment. He is 
survived by a wife. We have had a deal of pleasant 
correspondence with him on L. A. W. matters and 
had the pleasure of meeting him personally during 
the Meet at Denver in 1894. 



Dr. Henry Granger Piftard, professor emeritus of 
dermatology in New York University, died June 8, 
1909. He had been a professor in New York Uni- 
versity since 1875, but retired from active teaching 
about ten years ago, when the university gave him 
the degree L.L. D. 

Though Dr. Piffard was most eminent as a spe- 
cialist in diseases of the skin, he had the reputation 
of being one of the most versatile men in the medi- 
cal profession. He was one of the earliest workers 
in this country on the use of high frequency electric 
currents in the treatment of skin diseases. He dis- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 75 

covered the properties of the Piffard ray and in- 
vented the Piffard lamp for the application of ultra- 
violet rays to the treatment of disease. He had re- 
cently given a good deal of attention to the study of 
tuberculosis. Dr. Piffard was a voluminous writer 
on medical subjects and many of his books have been 
translated into foreign languages. 

Dr. Piffard has been a member of the L. A. W. 
since 1893 and he seldom came to Boston without 
visiting headquarters. He was a persistent rider of 
the wheel and always ready to do his part in pro- 
moting its interests. 



H. M. S. writes: "With my twenty-fifth annual 
renewal I send a word of congratulation and encour- 
agement. Keep the thing going. Don't get dis- 
couraged and give up the ship. Every time the 
Scrap Book comes to me my mind goes back to the 
old days and the good times we had. Nothing can 
take away the memory of the past. I wish we might 
get together again, but I can see that is impossible. 
A dollar a year is very little to pay out for a great 
big bunch of sentiment." 



The board of United States general appraisers 
refused on Thursday last to disturb a ruling made 
by the customs authorities in a case affecting the 
classification of imported saddles. The saddles were 
returned for duty at the rate of 45 per cent, under 
the provision for "manufactures of metal not wholly 
provided for." Wells, Fargo & Co., representing 
the importers, alleged that the duty should be at the 



76 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

rate of 35 per cent, as "manufactures in chief value 
of leather/' but the general appraiser overruled the 
claim. 



Travelers on the continent, and especially bicy- 
clists, know to their cost that the customs regula- 
tions on the Franco-Italian frontier are far more 
vexatious by road than railway. An amusing in- 
stance is recited where two cyclists turned the tables 
on the customs officials. They were on the Men- 
tone-Ventimiglia road and had to pass the Italian 
customs post below the pont St. Louis. It appears 
that their modest lunch of sandwiches and fruit was 
considered contraband, all comestibles having to pay 
duty. Naturally they refused to pay the duty, which 
amounted to more than the value of the food, and 
consequently the customs officials refused to let 
them enter Italian territory unless they paid duty on 
the sandwiches. However, the cyclists arose to the 
occasion, and retiring to French soil, they calmly 
disposed of their repast in full sight of the discom- 
fitted collectors. They then laughed at the officials 
and passed the post without further challenge. 



In the old days our Pennsylvania wheelmen used 
to score against the toll-gate keepers who tried to 
collect toll from riders of the wheel on the vehicle 
basis. They took their bicycles on their shoulders 
and paid the toll of a foot passenger. 



It was a master stroke on the part of that 
acknowledged woman hater, Lord Kitchener, to say 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 77 

as he departed on the Oceanic Tuesday, when asked 
his impressions of New York: "There is only one 
thing that I can think of now, and that is, that the 
women of this city are very beautiful. I do not 
wonder that you are proud of them." After that 
the New York reporters were willing to hand over 
the island to that greatest military genius as a part- 
ing gift! Since he didn't see our Boston girls we 
can readily forgive him. 



Once again the conversation had veered round to 
thrilling adventures. 

"That reminds me of an experience I had some 
time ago/' remarked a member. "I was riding a 
brakeless bicycle down a steep hill, when all of a 
sudden the chain snapped and I careened down the 
rest of the hill quicker than greased lightning. 

"The road down the hill took a turn at direct right 
angles, and in the corner of the angle stood a cot- 
tage. I was wondering what the verdict would be 
at the inquest, when I saw a man rest a plank of 
wood against the eaves of the cottage. 

"I went straight for the plank, over the roof, and 
down the other side. Luckily, the cottager's wife 
and daughters were shaking carpets, and, alighting 
on an outstretched carpet, I was gently lowered to 
the ground." 

A dead, dull silence descended on the company, 
which was broken by the hissing of a soda siphon. — 
Tid-Bits. 



'Young man desires position as secretary or 



78 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

bookkeeper. Educated for the ministry; otherwise 
trustworthy." Here is another illustration of the 
fact that you can't afford to skip the small want 
advertisements. 



Somebody asks this question: ''What is a baby 
worth?" To make a rough guess, we should say 
several hundred times what it costs. 



Julia Dean makes her entrance on a bicycle in the 
new play of "The Lily," by David Belasco, now 
playing in New York City. Miss Dean is an ac- 
complished rider and make a graceful appearance 
awheel. 



There are few times in a man's life when he feels 
of less importance than at his own wedding. 



The good die young, especially good resolutions. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known, magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. Thi9 Club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 400 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent * 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook . . . ." 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1. 00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century 4.00 3,85 

Harper's Magazine , 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Lif e 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .05 

Saint Nicholas 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance " 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by on© 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





KBGULAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOR 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



BaSSett'SSC»*apBoo(< 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anythln* useful to 
men Our rates :-$l 50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass.. under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ^uice, *i boston 

Vol. 8. No. 6 AUGUST, 1910 5 Cents 



AUGUST AND GREEIN CORN. 



It may be too hot to read, but hotter 'tis to write. 



Soon we shall be wheeling about the Hub. 



Our annual meeting Sept. 2. 



Wheel About the Hub, Sept. 3. 



Love laughs at locksmiths, but lots of us laugh 
at Love's myths. 



A rolling stone gathers no moss — but it some- 
times accumulates a noticeable polish. 

The Boston Bicycle Club will hold its annual 
Wheel About the Hub on Saturday, Sunday and 
Monday, Sept. 3, 4 and 5. The regular route will be 
covered. First night will be spent at Tudor Farm 
Club and the second night at Pemberton Inn. A 
very large company is expected. 

The annual meeting of the National Assembly, L. 



82 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

A. W., will be held at Hendries Hostelry, Talbot 
Ave., Dorchester district of Boston at 8 p. m. on 
Friday, Sept. 2. The annual election of officers will 
take place. At 6 p. m. there will be a dinner served 
in Hendries' best style. Notices and ballots have 
been sent to delegates. 



j6 cyclists, many of them women, engaged in the 
C. R. C. trip to Bermuda, remaining on the island 
five days. 



Following the arrest in Hartford,Conn., of one 
Harry Careri, who confessed that he and four pals 
made a business of stealing bicycles and selling them, 
the police of that city have recovered from surround- 
ing towns no less than 32 machines. Ten of them 
have been claimed by their owners but 22 are on 
hand awaiting claimants. 



The Newton (Mass). Bicycle Club held its 200th 
regular meeting and dinner at the Point Shirley 
Clubhouse on Saturday evening July 23. The club 
was guest of the new president, Mr. Herbert A. Ful- 
ler. The club sets up one of the finest dinners on 
the coast and that's what a hungry wheelman needs 
and must have and did have. Officers for 1910-11 
were elected: President, Herbert A. Fuller; Vice 
President, F. A. Hoyt; Secretary-Treasurer, Abbot 
Bassett. 



u To Scorch" is to ride at great speed on a bicycle. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 83 

Do we "scorch" in an Auto? If not, why not? The 
French say of a furious rider he burns the pavement, 
and no doubt there was a slang word applied to the 
driving of Jehu, the son of Nimshi, by exasperated 
or admiring Hebrews. This reminds us that the 
Rev. Mr. Chalmers was in an automobile stopped in 
New York state the other day for furious speed. 
He should have remembered the remark of the cler- 
gyman who in John Phoenix's story was driven, at 
the risk of his life, by a Californian. "Do you know 
why you are like the Pharisees? Because you appear 
unto men too fast." 



"That girl has an unfortunate idea of repartee.'' 
"Yes," answered Miss Cayenne. "She has an idea 

that she is saying smart things when she is merely 

saying things that smart." 



The automobile seems to be the universal goat. 
Here are the woolen manufacturers maintaining that 
people who ride in the new vehicles habitually wear 
their second best clothes, not only on account of the 
dust, but because the machine attracts all the atten- 
tion and any sort of raiment will pass unnoticed. If 
business in any line is dull now the explanation is 
easy. All the money of the country is being spent 
for gasoline. 



To his teacher's request that he give the class 
ideas on the subject of "Bravery," little Johnny de- 
livered himself of the following: 

"Some boys is brave because they always plays 



84 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

with little boys, and some boys is brave because their 
legs is too short to run away, but most boys is brave 
because somebody's lookin'." 



A physician announces that it is comparatively 
easy to live to the century mark. All you have to do 
is — don't drink alcoholic or malt liquors, don't 
smoke, go to bed at ten and rise at six, sleep soundly, 
don't worry about making money, nothing in excess, 
the simple life all the time, don't get excited, eat 
only when you feel inclined and precious little then. 
But wouldn't "one crowded hour of glorious life" be 
worth a century of such a pallid existence? 



John Boyd Dunlop, inventor of the pneumatic tire, 
is to have a statue in bronze at Edinburgh, Scotland. 
Not often do we see a statue erected to one still in 
the flesh. 



Did Dunlop give us the pneumatic? R. W. Thom- 
son, who for many years lived in Edinburgh, where 
for years he was president of the Scottish Society of 
Arts and where he died in 1872, actually produced 
rubber tires in one form or another in 1848. His 
son is authority for the statement that the Dunlop 
Pneumatic Tire Company at present has in its pos- 
session a set of brougham wheels fitted with the 
original Thomson tires. Of the existence of a prior 
invention in the same line, it should be added in jus- 
tice to the recipient of premier honors, Dunlop was 
unaware when he conceived and brought out the bi- 
cvcle tire. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 85 

THE RIDING AGE. 

The rich man takes a special train, the king his coach of 

state, 
The picnic fills the farmer's wain, the beggar hugs the 

freight, 
The chariot whirls the bride to church, the taxi speeds 

the groom, 
The lovers make the buggy lurch, the banker owns his 

brougham. 
The ambulance the wounded takes, the doctor autos 

round, 
The prison van removes the fakes, the stretcher lifts the 

drowned. 
The boy a bicycle bestrides, the sport a tandem drives, 
The babe a basket carriage rides, the trolley takes our 

wiv r es. 
The farmer rides most anything, the railroads carry all, 
The sailor board his ship will spring, the police their 

wagon call. 
And some will choose a hack or gig, and some a 

landaulet, 
And some most any kind of rig — dog cart or wagonette. 
But one there is that none will choose, yet 'twill to each 

befall, 
And none of us will it refuse — the hearse will take us all. 



Horace Fogel, a former newspaper reporter and 
nominal president of the Philadelphia baseball club, 
claims that on March 12th, 1909, while on St. Charles 
street, in New Orleans, La., a messenger boy em- 
ployed by the W. U. T. Co., ran over him while he 
was attempting to board a trolley car. For the in- 
juries to his person and his dignity Fogel asks the 
United States circuit court to award him the sum of 
$25,000 as damages. 

Carrying a letter from the mayor of his home 



86 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

town, Guthrie, Okla., to the mayor of New York 
City, in the manner generally adopted by long dis- 
tance travelers, Gerald Latshaw, a 16 year old boy, is 
coming east on his bicycle. He left Guthrie on July 
5th, and will go via St. Louis, Cincinnati, Wheeling, 
Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Jersey City. He hopes 
to reach New York City some time in the latter part 
of August. 



There are still 100 names on the membership roll 
of the Peoria (111). Bicycle club and the organization 
is kept intact, although it is actually but little more 
than a memory, and on July 23d thirty-six of them 
observed one of the old traditions by keeping alive 
the memory of the annual chicken run to Mossville. 
Of the thirty-six members of the club who attended 
the chicken supper only three of them rode thither 
on bicycles in the good old way. These veterans 
who clung close to the traditions of the club 
were Charles F. Vail, H. C. Morse and Stephen 
Tripp. As a diversion Charles F. Vail stated 
that the bicycle was coming in again and that 
last year no less than 300,000 were manufactured in 
the United States and the indications are that the 
output for this year will be still greater. The bicycle 
of today is, however, no longer a social factor, but 
serves a strictly utilitarian purpose and as such has 
come to stay. 

The formality of electing officers of the Peoria Bi- 
cycle club for the ensuing year closed the annual ob- 
servance and resulted in the election of Guy T. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 87 

Mowat, president; Charles P. Watson, secretary, and 
Marion X. Chuse, treasurer. 



The following resolution was adopted at a recent 
meeting of the St. Louis Cycling Club: "That at 
every Sunday dinner a tax of five cents be levied to 
be contributed toward any movement for the better- 
ment of the roads in the vicinity of the eating station. 
That the treasurer keep a separate accounting of this 
road fund. That no appropriation be made from the 
fund except upon sanction of the executive commit- 
tee." 



L. A. W. 

"When falls the Coliseum, 

Rome shall fall." 

When falls the League 

The cycling world will pay 

The tribute of its tears. 

They builded better than they knew, 

Those Newport pioneers, 

For who could then foretell 

What should be done. 

A hundred thousand strong 

We climbed the heights, 

And then came down again. 

We celebrate the past. 

The past top-full of grand achievement, 

Cart paths made roads, 

The road a boulevard, 

Linked them in friendship's bond. 

In making mankind friends, 

We made them happier, nobler men. 

We celebrate the past, 

But still work on, 

Our work is not yet done. 



Toast. — Where sentiment lives, nothing outgrows its use- 
fulness. 



88 feASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

That the bicycle presents a quick means of escape 
in times of need was brought forcibly home to a 
mayor of a Mexican city when nearly all the inhabi- 
tants were massacred. One of the few to escape was 
Hernandez, the mayor, who, disguised as a woman, 
made his escape on a bicycle. 



Scores of residents of Pleasantville, N. J., indig- 
nant at the rise in trolley rates, have taken to riding 
the "bike" across the meadows in going to and from 
Atlantic City and their homes. They claim they can 
make the five miles in a half hour, and prefer it to 
paying the double fare of ten cents, or twenty cents 
for the road trip. "It is healthful," one of the "bi- 
kers" said, "and I am using the cash saved to buy 
building and loan stock. It is fine and we are get- 
ting more recruits every day. We call it the 'Trol- 
ley Trust Busting Mounted Infantry/ " 



While French lawyers are putting their heads to- 
gether to devise a code of laws regulating aerial 
navigation with a view to safeguarding the rights of 
those who remain on earth, British householders are 
writing to the Times and warning trespassers off 
their premises. Mr. Devey, for instance, writes to 
the Jupiter to say that no aeroplanist could precipi- 
tate himself against the chimney-pots or upon the 
flower beds of the Devey cottage at Torquay without 
being immediately called to account for it. Mr. De- 
vey intends to have his chimneys armed with strong 
iron spikes and to paint the word "Danger" in large 
red letters upon his roof. If, despite such precau- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 89 

tions, any flying machine should come down in his 
garden, he intends to send for the police to remove 
the occupants, whom he will afterward sue for any 
damage done to his trees and shrubbs. 



Qualifying his position with the assertion that 
"When people persist in doing a thing and you can't 
stop them, the next best thing is to regulate them," 
Mayor Martin, of Hutchinson, Kan., is having all 
bicycle riders tagged and licensed. The trouble arose 
over the habit of riding on the sidewalks long in- 
dulged in by the city's 1,000 cyclists, and the inabili- 
ty of the police to stop the practice. Hereafter when 
a cyclist desires to ride on the sidewalks he will have 
to secure a license tag at $i per year, and will have 
to get off his wheel every time he meets or overtakes 
a pedestrian. 



Kirk Munroe, our great first cause, and top of the 
list man, writes from Cocoanut Grove, Florida: — 

'The enclosed notice has just come to hand, and 
I hasten to rush forward my dollar, for fear lest you 
should drop me from the Honor Roll, and thus 
cause me a very sincere grief. 

"Of course I want to renew not only now, but every 
year so long as the L. A. W. and I are in existence; 
for NUMBER ONE can't afford to resign at any 
price. Although I have both an automobile and a 
motor boat, I find my wheel as much a necessity, for 
exercise, pleasure, and convenience, as ever, and 
rarely does a day pass that I don't use it. I took a 
twelve mile ride this very morning, the last two miles 



90 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

in a drenching rain, and I hope to continue an active 
wheelman just as long as I continue to abide above 
ground. With sincerest regards and good wishes 
I remain, truly your friend and fellow wheelman." 



Here is a Fourth of July letter from Fred Patee, 
now of Denver, Col. We all remember Fred, and I 
can well believe that some of the members will be 
glad to know about our old friend Potter. 

"My Dear Bassett: — Some one has been kind 
enough to send me a copy of Bassett' s Scrap Book, 
I don't know where it came from, but I appreciate it 
just the same. Just about a year ago I was in Bos- 
ton and Lon Peck and I went up to call upon you but 
were not lucky enough to catch you at home. I 
think you had gone to a ball game or to the 101 
Ranch, Wild West show, I've forgotten which, but 
which ever it was it shows that the Sporting blood 
still runs Red in your veins, and that the L. A. W. 
will live as long as Bassett does, to say the least. 
Well, here's success to you both and I want to say 
right now that as soon as my ship comes in (and 
she's on the way now). I am going to pay up and take 
Life membership so I will die a member, at least 
unless you should die f^rst, which I don't believe you 
will. Well, I learned something that I had often 
wondered about, by glancing through this first num- 
ber of the Scrap Book, and that was where, and how 
old "Happy Days" became famous. Not that I was 
not in game myself, at that early date but as long 
as I've known Will Pitman I never knew how he got 
into the game himself. And you mention another 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 91 

old timer and old friend, Fairchild, he was here the 
other day and he, McGuire and I took lunch togeth- 
er. The next day I met Joe Goodman and his wife 
on 16th street. Joe is making his first Western trip 
and is on his way somewhere between here and the 
Pacific yet, I guess. Charlie Fairchild and I had a 
good talk about the old timers around Boston, and 
among others Stall's name was mentioned. I haven't 
seen or heard of Stall for so long it was like going 
back into another generation, and indeeed isn't it? 

My son will be 26 in November and is married and 
I am informed through a most reliable source that 
I will be a grandfather before long. What does that 
look like? The idea that my mother will be a great 
grandmother is hard to swallow. It seems perfectly 
natural that I should be a grandfather, that's my 
own foolishness perhaps, but it don't seem right that 
my mother should be a great grandmother. But I 
guess she will, it sort of runs in the family. My own 
grandmother did not die until a very few years ago, 
and my son was then about 24, the same age my 
daughter is now. My daughter is also married, and 
both she and her brother live in California, she in 
Los Angeles and he in Pasadena. 

I see that the Century Road Club is still alive and 
going. I remember how that was started, Billy Her- 
rick, F. Ed. Spooner and myself, discussing things in 
general in Chicago one night and one of us proposed 
a Club for Centuries, and we organized it right then 
and there, and by the next day had a big club with a 
good big membership. It was The Century Club of 



92 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Chicago, then, and I've still got one of the first lot 
pins that Herrick and I ordered. 

Our Attorneys here are Potter, West and Potter. 
Isaac Potter is a member of the firm, but I have 
never seen him since we have been doing business 
with them as he is in Goldfield most of the time. 
I suppose that today he is watching Jeff and Jack. 
Well, this is quite a letter but it's a holiday and I 
guess you'll forgive me." 



Old Quidsby liked being rich very well indeed, but 
he wished that his chef would not write the menu in 
his native language — French. 

"I should like to know what I'm eating for once, 
M. Alphonse," he said to that functionary. "Let us 
have the menu in English today." 

"Oui, m'sieu. It ees ver' difficile, but I veel do it 
so, if you veel seize for me ze dictionaire." 

A small but select party came to dinner that even- 
ing, and were somewhat astonished at the following 
menu: 

Soup at the tail of the calf. 

Salmon in curl-papers. 

Chest of mutton to 1 the little peas. 

Potatoes jumped. 

Ducks savage at sharp sauce. 

Charlotte at the apples. 

Turkey at the devil. 

Fruits variegated. 

But Quidsby and Mrs. Quidsby agreed afterwards 
that they had never presided over a more hilarious 
dinner-party. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 93 

In England, in particular, bicycle acts are espe- 
cially popular with the patrons of the "'halls," and 
some of the performances which are given before 
them are well worth seeing, as a couple of typical 
illustrations will show. In the case of one act which 
has been extremely successful as a drawing card, the 
good judgment of the cyclist in riding at a uniform 
rate as well as quickness of eye and agility is 
matched against the dexterity of a billiard player. 
A clever "jump shot" is made just as the rider 
reaches a given point, the ball circling high in the 
air and being caught in a little pocket attached to 
the head of the second performer, who "ducks" just 
in season to land it. 



A LOW-DOWN TRICK. 

"Won't you step into my airship," 

Said the 'ator to the girl; 
"It is the prettiest airship 

That ever went awhirl." 

"Im afraid to try your airship," 

Said the maiden to the chauff'; 
"I'm afraid that, while we'e flying, 

Possibly I might fall off." 

"There's no danger, I assure you," 

Said the flyer to the maid; 
"I will hold you quite securely 

If you really are afraid." 

So they sat them in the airship, 

But it simply wouldn't rise; 
While the maiden's disappointment 

Went a-soaring to the skies. 

— Joe Cone. 



Tis time to dine," the Walrus said. "But not 



94 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

on us," the oysters cried; "that would be a dismal 
tking to do." The Carpenter said not a word, but 
"cut us another slice." Respectfully referred to the 
Commission on Cost of Living. 



"Mere commemoration of the deeds of the past is 
valueless unless the memory of what has been 
nerves us to the achievement of what ought to be," 
said Curtis Guild, doctor of theology, to his audi- 
ence in Cincinnati. "You couldn't deny that even if 
you tried with both hands," said the Red Queen to 
Alice. 



A day off once in a while means more days on by 
and by. 



GIFTS FROM MEMBERS. 

Cortlandt De P. Field, Peekskill, N. Y. $20.00 

J. M. Pickens, Washington, D. C. 1.00 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Every magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the club numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslee $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 6b 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge 5.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 J2 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's . — 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1.00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century ••••••: 4.oo 3.85 

Harper s Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas _ 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 







KBGULAR 



IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTER FOR 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 




GOOD COMPANY 
on GOOD ROADS 



THE PRICE TO PAY. 

DUES. — Applicants pay 75 cents a year. Memberships may be 
renewed for 75 cents a year. Members may subscribe for the official 
organ at the club rate of 25 cents. This is optional and the sum must 
be paid in addition to the dues. Life membership #10. Can be taken 
by none other than one who has been a member for five years prev- 
ious. Life members must pay the additional fee of 25 cents per year 
for the official organ if they desire it. 



APPLICATION BLANK — If applicant is unprovided with 
regular blank from headquarters, he may write his name, address and 
occupation on a slip of paper 6 by 3 inches. Add the names of two 
references and send same with one dollar to Abbot Bassett, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. Regular 
blank supplied on application. 



TOURING ABROAD.— Members touring abroad are entitled 
to call upon the Secretary-Treasurer for a ticket of membership in 
the Cyclist Touring Club of England. This ticket will give the 
holder all the advantages of the hotel and consul system which the 
C. T. C. has in Great Britain and on the Continent, and will save 
much trouble at the custom houses, where the ticket will be a 
passport in lieu of a cash deposit. 



SUPPLIES —Badges : Solid gold, $2 ; plated, $1 ; Enameled 
Rim, 75 cents. Russia leather ticket holders, 25 cents. Veteran 
Bar, price $2.50. Screw Driver for Key Ring, 10 cents. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by on© 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





KBGULAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columhia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTRIBUTER FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During trie winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



B«SSett*S SC«P BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-SLM an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, §1.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ' DU ^ UU 

Vol. 8. No. 8 OCTOBER, 1910 5 Cents 



OCTOBER THE WIZARD OF AUTUMN. 



In one way, October is the most typical month in 
the year. The average temperature of the middle of 
October is the temperature for the whole year. But 
October's weather is a sad fall from the beauties of 
a fine September. September's 115 hours of sunshine 
drop to 75, which is October's average of bright sun. 
The days, too, shorten sadly. 

October is like the last drink at a banquet — the 
last of a good thing. Like going out into the night 
is the passage from Fall to Winter. 

The theory that faint heart ne'er won fair lady 
doesn't interest the fellow who prefers brunettes. 



Fire which started in a barrel of waste on top of 
the ell of Kimball's Hotel at Skipper's Point, Cohas- 
set, last month, almost completely destroyed the 
hotel, which has been one of the well-known shore 
resorts of Greater Boston for many years. This 
hotel formerly was run by Peter Kimball and was 



14 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

one of the famous fish dinner resorts of the South 
Shore. More recently it had been conducted by 
Peter Kimball's son, Henry B. Kimball, who was 
away when the fire started. At one time Thomas W. 
Lawson tried to buy the hotel but failed. Here it 
was that the Wheelmen going About the Hub spent 
the second night. First night at Massapoag; second 
at Kimball's; both burned up and there is little left 
to hang a dormitory halo upon. 



As Boston wheelmen read of the travels about the 
country of ex-president Roosevelt in a car furnished 
by his fellow magazine exploiters, and cared for as to 
the outer and inner man by Mr. William B. Howland, 
they recall the days when Mr. Howland was editing 
the Wheelman Magazine and quite content to asso- 
ciate with bicycle riders on the road and at the race 
track. 



Note quite an increase in the contents of our ad- 
vertising pages. Will you not, forsaking all others, 
patronize them in getting what you want in their 
line? 



Two old-time Boston wheelmen have recently left 
us. James A. R. Underwood started in wheeling as 
a candidate for racing honors and showed good speed 
and great promise till an unfortunate accident 
checked his career and put him out of the running. 
He then took an agency for an English wheel and 
kept it until American wheels pushed the English 
machine out, aided by a high tariff. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 115 

Died suddenly August 31 at Winthrop, Mass., 
Samuel N. Turner, once a popular member of the 
Boston Bi Club. Was one of the good fellows of 
the early days. He was of an inventive turn of mind 
and patents which he took out covered several fea- 
tures of the modern photographic camera. He had 
devised a microscopic lamp for surgical use; an in- 
genious broom for the facilitation of street sweepers' 
work and a number of other things on which his roy- 
alties reached a heavy figure. He left Boston for 
Brooklyn, N. Y., quite a few years ago, and died in 
that city last April. 

Fred Atwater, treasurer of the Columbia Nut and 
Bolt Company, and member of the paving commis- 
sion, was elected president of the League of Ameri- 
can Wheelmen at Boston last Friday. The news of 
Mr. Atwater's election as the head of the L. A. W. 
will recall many stirring memories among the old 
wheelmen of this city, at the time when P. W. West- 
lake was head of the state division and president of 
the old Hartford Wheel Club, which in later years 
was the nucleus in the formation of the present 
Bridgeport Club. President Atwater arrived home 
yesterday from Boston, where he was delayed on 
business. It has been one of the ambitions of his life 
to be the national head of the L. A. W., and he at 
last has reached his ambition. One of his hopes is to 
have a reunion of the old wheelmen in this city and 
to stir up a little interest in the L. A. W., which was 
the pioneer organization in the world whose work 



116 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

was dedicated to the cause of good roads. — Bridge- 
port paper. 



THE WHEEL ABOUT THE HUB. 

One wheel around and about the Hub of the Uni- 
verse is much like all the rest, and so is one dough- 
nut much like all the rest, but how we do enjoy the 
circle of cake and wish the hole was not there. Some 
dozen times we have told the tale of the famous run, 
and every time our pen has not quite come up to a 
perfect picture of this life in the open, on steeds that 
eat not, neither do they tire. The wheel for 1910 
was in very many respects just like the wheel of 
1909, and yet very much different. We started from 
the very same spot — but first let me tell you who 
comprised "we." In this respect we need to be par- 
ticular, for every man who does a thing like this is 
unhappy if his name does not go into print, and some 
of our enthusiastic wheelers would rather go on a 
W. A. T. H. than go to Congress. Here is the party. 
We put the lively bicycle riders ahead and the effemi- 
nate autoists in the rear, and we shall mark with an 
asterisk air those who circled for the first time. 

Bicycles — Capt. W. G. Kendall, John Rush Green, 
John B. Kelley, Chas. C. Ryder, Augustus Nicker- 
son, Joseph W. Swan, Theo. Rothe, all of Boston. 
George L. Cooke, Providence; Will R. Pitman, New 
York; Dr. A. F. Wyman, New Bedford; Marriott C. 
Morris, W. L. Lockhart,* Dr. Clarence Wright,* all 
of Philadelphia, and the indispensable "Lazarus," the 
repair man. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 117 

In Automobiles — Frank W. Weston, Abbot Bas- 
sett, Thomas H. Hall, Fred D. Irish, Fred J. Stark, 
Joseph A. Hendrie, A. A. Greenlaw, all of Boston. 
Chas. J. Obermayer, W. M. Meserole, Geo. T. Steb- 
bins,* M. M. Belding, Jr., Fred G. Lee, George B. 
Woodward, Kenneth Woodward, Robert J. Danby,* 
all of New York. Thomas P. Himes, Arthur VV, 
Martin,* Wm. G. Rankin,* all of Providence. Fred 
Atwater, Bridgeport, Conn.; A. G. Fisher,* New 
Haven, Conn.; Elmer G. Whitney, Dover, N. H. 

It was indeed a goodly company. The Grove of 
Pleasant Memories added one more evergreen, and 
the lunch under the trees was a star-play by the 
caterer. We took a look at the great Avery Oak at 
Dedham for which a large price was offered by those 
who wanted good oak timber to build the Constitu- 
tion, but it was not for sale and today it stands on a 
reservation never to be encroached upon by any 
building. The Fairbanks family gave us a cordial 
welcome to the old homestead, built in 1636. Many 
climbed Blue Hill to get a sight of the air-ships, but 
there was nothing to be seen and we found no rival 
engaged in flying about the Hub. It rained late in 
the day and the wheel riders got damp, but the auto- 
ists under their tops laughed at the rain. A banquet 
at Tudor Farm. Speeches by Weston, Bassett, who 
gave a history of the "wheel" of 1892; Atwater who 
responded for the L. A. W. ; Obermayer who talked 
for New York. Tom Hall sang "Philadelphia in the 
Morning." 

A pleasant day greeted us the next morning. A 



118 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

lunch under the great Oak of Ponkapog, which the 
boys voted larger than the Avery Oak, for it has a 
waist measure of 19 feet, 6 inches. The largest tree 
among the great Waverley Oaks measures 17 feet, 
3 inches, and is said to be 500 years old. 

And then a run to Pemberton over the five-mile 
stretch along the peninsula. A group of Boston 
wheelmen came down by boat to dine with us at 
Pemberton Inn. 

And we rode home, some of us that night, but 
many of the wheelmen the next day. Hendrie, the 
very popular caterer of the club, has purchased a 
large estate of 75 acres at Sharon Heights, on which 
there is a very pretty cottage house. He will make 
additions to the house, build anew near at hand, and 
by another year there will be a place called "Pine 
Cliff" where rest and entertainment may be had. We 
paid a visit to the place and Hendrie received many 
compliments, much encouragement and a deal of ad- 
vice. 

At Tudor Farm a discussion was had regarding 
the date of the tour, which has been changed from 
its original date of Sept. 11 to Saturday before Labor 
Day. Two years' trial of the new date has convinced 
everyone that the change was a mistake and a vote 
taken was unanimous in favor of going back. 

Last spring, at its annual dinner, the Essex 
Bicycle Club of New Jersey sent a complimentary 
telegram to the Boston Bi Club. By vote of the 
meeting at Tudor Farm the following telegram was 
sent. — To the Essex Bicycle Club of Newark, N. J.: 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 119 

— "The Boston Bicycle Club, en route on its annual 
Wheel About the Hub, under the inspiration of life 
in the open air, and the exhilarating effects of riding 
the wheel, sends this expression of its affection and 
esteem to its brothers of the wheel in New Jersey." 
And the twentieth cycle along the periphery under 
the auspices of the Boston Bicycle Club, rolled into 
history, leaving a trace of pleasant memories and 
hearty good fellowship such as we never fail to find 
in the circle of cycledom. 

The Bicycle Editor of "Motor-Bi" has an article 
on "The Wheel About Hub" in September number. 
It has pictures taken at Tudor Farm, at Canton and 
"Under the Oak." The October number will have a 
report of the Good Roads Convention at St. Louis 
by the same writer. See special offer to L. A. W. 
members in our advertising columns. 



GOOD ROADS CONVENTION. 



The Third Annual Good Roads Convention was 
held at St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 28, 29, 30. 

The Convention was made up from Delegates rep- 
resenting the American Automobile Association, the 
National Grange, The National Board of Road In- 
quiry, The League of American Wheelmen and many 
kindred organizations interested in Highway Im- 
provement. 

The meetings were held in the Coliseum, where in 
addition to the exhibition of talk there was an ex- 
hibition of road-making machinery, paving material, 
oils, etc. 



120 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

The papers were not such as to attract a popular 
audience, but they proved a valuable contribution 
from the wisdom and experience of the best experts 
in this line. 

The audience was made up of interested and 
thoughtful men who came both to give out and take 
in. 

Especially valuable were papers from Prof. A. H. 
Blanchard of Brown University on the "Dustless 
Roads of Europe"; by Chas. W. Ross of Newton, 
Mass., on "Surface Treatment for Roads"; by F. E. 
Lott on "Across Missouri Highways," and a Talk 
by Highway Commissioner Harold Parker of Mass- 
achusetts, giving his experience in road building in 
difficult places in Massachusetts. The L. A. W. was 
represented by its Secretary-Treasurer, Abbot Bas- 
sett, who gave a history of the birth of the Good 
Roads movement, for which credit must be given to 
the wheelmen in general and the L. A. W. in partic- 
ular. We shall try to publish this in a later, issue. 
All the addresses will be printed in a pamphlet which 
may be obtained by applying to A. G. Batchelder, 
537 Broadway, New York City. 

It was not all serious work, for there was a boat 
ride on the Mississippi River with lunch accompani- 
ment; a visit to the Anheuser-Busch Brewery, which 
covers 165 acres and is valued at twenty-two million 
dollars, where beer was furnished in quantities 
suited to the capacity of the largest consumer; a ride 
through the residential districts; and a grand ban- 
quet at the Planters' Hotel. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 121 

It was, on the whole, a convention well carried 
out, very fertile in its fund of information given 
freely to the world, and it cannot fail to be prolific 
in results. 

A discussion on Convict Labor on the Roads by 
Joseph Hyde Pratt of Chapel Hill, N. C, went into 
some of the problems which have come up when 
wheelmen dealt with this question and proved of ex- 
ceeding interest. 

Governor H. S. Hadley and Mayor F. H. Kreis- 
man of St. Louis gave the glad hand of welcome and 
we shook the hand^and took what was offered. 

In choosing the place for the Convention a novel 
method was adopted. A guarantee fund of $10,000 
for the entertainment of the delegates was de- 
manded. Thirty days was given to raise the sum. 
Atlanta was given first chance; Denver the second 
and Milwaukee the third. There is little doubt of 
its going to Atlanta. 

President Fred Atwater of the L. A. W. was ap- 
pointed a member of the Committee on the 191 1 
Meet. 



Diversions at St. Louis. — The wheelmen of St. 
Louis made it very pleasant for Esstee while he was 
in that city attendant upon the Good Roads Conven- 
tion. The St. Louis Cycling Club invited him to a 
complimentary banquet at the Mercantile Club on 
Wednesday, 28th, and forty members of the club 
gathered at table to do him honor. President A. A. 
Beckman presided and Captain Robert E. Lee was 
Toastmaster. There were speeches by the President, 



122 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

by Wm. M. Butler, Harry S. Sharpe, George Tidd, 
H. G. Wolzendorf and many others. 

The guest responded to a complimentary toast and 
spoke of the old friends, now gone, who welcomed 
him at St. Louis during the L. A. W. Meet in 1887. 
The St. Louis Cycling Club is a marvel in that it has 
a membership composed of some of the veterans, but 
for the most part of young men below 25 years of 
age. In these days we seldom see the young fellows 
in clubs, for they have no£ yet awakened to the idea 
that in union there is strength and also pleasure. 
The guest also read a poem recalling old cycling 
friends. 

On Friday the President of the club, Mr. Beck- 
man, took Esstee and others on an automobile tour 
through the city and out into the country, where, at 
Clayton, the inner man was refreshed and sustained. 
While in the city we looked up the former Presi- 
dent, James Randall Dunn, and had pleasant calls 
from Percy Stone, an old time racer. 

It is a good thing to revive old memories in the 
meeting with former friends and St. Louis is a 
garden full for us of evergreens. 

One of the papers referred to us as Secretary of 
the League of American Women, but we didn't mind 
that. 



The following items from London papers may 
interest some of your readers. The first item is re- 
spectfully submitted to the American farmer in be- 
half of wheelmen. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 123 

"As we were driving along the Great North road 
a few nights ago we came into sudden and violent 
collision with a cow, and when we took an inventory 
of damages the cow reported the loss of one per- 
fectly good horn, for which, however, she had little 
further use, as she was even then on her way to 
change herself into a more attractive form — the roast 
beef of old England. We had two smashed lights, a 
broken radiator, two bent and twisted wings, and our 
bonnet was a complete wreck." 

Personally I like cows, but they have very little 
idea of the rules of the road. They are set in their 
ways, and they are set in our ways by their careless 
owners. 

It is clearly the duty of the motorists to take up 
this cow question seriously and try to force the 
breeders to produce a strain of luminous cows. I do 
not suggest how this is to be done; possibly glow- 
worm meal would help. But until the strain is per- 
fected we might require the farmers to paint their 
cows with phosphorus or teach them to sound their 
horns, or have a man walk at the head of each cow 
with a white light and another at her heels with a 
red, or they might even be induced to keep their 
cows at home after dark. L. R. Smith. 



The sheriff of Jackson County, Mo., has six motor 
cars in his official keeping because their owners can- 
not raise money enough to pay their grocery and 
dry goods bills. He says he has never had to hold 
one of the machines because of inability to pay bills 



124 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

for repairs, but it is the common practice of motor- 
ists to forget other bills. How it always happens 
that a man can buy what he wants. The man with- 
out money for bread always finds enough for to- 
bacco. 



Nicholas Joseph Cugnot is to have a monument. 
If anyone asks who Cugnot was, it may be said 
briefly he was the first automobilist. Many years 
before Stephenson had introduced his railway loco- 
motive, Cugnot, who was a military engineer, had 
made a locomotive for roads. His own folks scarcely 
knew of him until the recent automobile exhibition, 
but his locomotive has been piously preserved in 
the Conservatoire des Arts et Metiers. The place 
for the memorial is, as it should be, in the commune 
of Void (Meuse), where he was born in 1725. Cug- 
not died in 1804. His lot was not that of many 
geniuses. He did not die in want. Napoleon had 
secured him a pension of 1000 francs — "passing rich 
on 40 pounds a year." In this respect the premier 
consul showed more enlightenment than he did in 
regard to Fulton, of steamboat fame, whom he con- 
sidered — it is distressing to write — an adventurer. 
Cugnot's carriage was built to transport arms, and 
he had designed a service gun. These achievements 
alone would be a< passport to Napoleon's favor. 
Cugnot's steam carriage was crude enough from our 
point of view. It was built in 1769. He used a pair 
of single acting high pressure cylinders to turn a 
driving axle step by step by means of pawls and 
ratchet wheels. — Dundee Advertiser. 



LOCKHART SUSPENDER CO. 

LINCOLN 



Suspenders Garters 

Belts 

1307-09-11 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WM. L. LOCKHART, 
Treasurer 

AUGUSTUS NICKERSON 

Certified 
Public Accountant 

Room 708 Exchange Building 

53 State Street BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Main 3007 



ooeo« 

I Broadway Trust | 



i 



Company 



! 754 BROADWAY 

c. nR mf p "FTnMTiT STREET 



CORNER 
N BW 



EIGHTH 

YORK 



CITY 



I 



Capital, $700,000 
Surplus, $350,000 





OFFICERS : 




FREDERIC G. LEE 


President 


M. M. BELDING, Jr. - 


- Vice-President 


MARKS ANHEIM 


Vice-President 


JOHN W. H. BERGEN - 


- Secretary 


LOUIS S. QUIMBY 


Ass't Secretary 


JOHN D. VAN OLINDA - 


- Ass't Secretary 



tt«* 




GOOD COMPANY 
on GOOD ROADS 



THE PRICE TO PAY. 

DUES. — Applicants pay 75 cents a year. Memberships may be 
renewed for 75 cents a year. Members may subscribe for the official 
organ at the club rate of 25 cents. This is optional and the sum must 
be paid in addition to the dues. Life membership $10. Can be taken 
by none other than one who has been a member for five years prev- 
ious. Life members must pay the additional fee of 25 cents per year 
for the official organ if they desire it. 



APPLICATION BLANK.— If applicant is unprovided with 
regular blank from headquarters, he may write his name, address and 
occupation on a slip of paper 6 by 3 inches. Add the names of two 
references and send same with one dollar to Abbot Bassett, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. Regular 
blank supplied on application. 



TOURING ABROAD.— Members touring abroad are entitled 
to call upon the Secretary-Treasurer for a ticket of membership in 
the Cyclist Touring Club of England. This ticket will give the 
holder all the advantages of the hotel and consul system which the 
C. T. C. has in Great Britain and on the Continent, and will save 
much trouble at the custom houses, where the ticket will be a 
passport in lieu of a cash deposit. 



SUPPLIES —Badges: Solid gold, $2 ; plated, $1 ; Enameled 
Rim, 75 cents. Russia leather ticket holders, 25 cents. "Veteran 
Bar, price $2.50. Screw Driver for Key Ring, 10 cents. 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 



ISTiBIIb^ 



REGULAR IMPROVED 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 




ALONZO D. PECK, 



DISTRIBUTER FOR 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use: 



Batfett'S Scrap Bool< 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefor© a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, 81.00 an inch! 

Entered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 8. No. 9 NOVEMBER, igio 5 Cents 



DON'T PUT ON THE BRAKE TILL IT IS 
TIME TO STOP. 



The impression left upon our mind by the St. 
Louis Convention was, that, although the North 
and East are now provided with good roads, the 
work of improving the highways is not half com- 
pleted. This is a great country and there is a great 
big piece of it where the roads are anything but 
Sfood. 



The L. A. W. is the parent of good roads, and it 
should never fail to lend its assistance and its influ- 
ence to those who are working to give the South and 
West as good roads as the North and East are riding 
over. 



"What happened to Babylon?" asl^ed the Sunday 
school teacher. 

"It fell!" cried the pupil. 
"And what became of Nineveh?" 
"It was destroyed." 
"And what of Tyre?" 
"Punctured !" — Cleveland Leader. 



126 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Our good friend, Geo. D. Gideon of Philadelphia, 
lodges with us an emphatic protest and complaint in 
that we said in our last issue that he was "one of the 
first to wheel on a bicycle from Philadelphia to New 
York, within the day." He claims that he was the 
great and only first. Knowing him as we do, we 
think him capable of it, and we give him the record. 
Here is his description of the ride: 

"But we did not have roads then. I remember dis- 
tinctly that what passed as roads were being 
ploughed as I went through and in some places the 
feeding cattle were a great annoyance. I also re- 
member that I had a cane seat with copper rivets, 
every one of which had its own blister the next day 
and it was quite a week before I could sit down. 
Never since have I been so anxious to get to New 
York that I would have been willing to ride there in 
one day on a high bicycle." 

Now we hope George D. will erase our name from 
his Annanias Club. 



To follow President Taft's automobile when it 
whirls around Washington requires nerve as well as 
a speedy machine. The District of Columbia police, 
who guard President Taft while in that city, possess 
both. 



Chester, Pa., Sept. 25. — Mounted upon bicycles 
John H. Hoffman and his brother, Edward E. Hoff- 
man, of Brooklyn, passed through this city today en 
route for Gettysburg, where they will attend the re- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 127 

union and dedicatory exercises of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. 

The brothers are members of Abel Smith Post 
No. i, of Long Island, and are nearly 70 years old. 
They left Brooklyn last Sunday and rode on bicycles 
to Atlantic City, where they attended the annual en- 
campment of the Grand Army. Friday evening they 
left for Somers Point, N. J., thence to Camden, to 
Philadelphia, and came to this city, whence they de- 
parted today for Baltimore. — Phila. North American, 
Sept. 26. 



Something new in the nature of a track event re- 
cently was tried out at an automobile meet in Dallas, 
Texas, and proved both novel and diverting. It was 
styled a "speed violator's chase." When an auto- 
mobilist came flying down the stretch, he was sig- 
nalled to stoy by a "policeman," and when he failed 
to do so the latter promptly hopped on his motor- 
cycle and gave chase. The make-believe "cop" had 
to ride all out for two miles before he brought the 
"culprit" before the judges. In this case the sen- 
tence took the form of a silver cup — the prize at 
stake — presented to the "policeman." 



Our fellow-member, Acting Secretary of State 
Alvey A. Adee, who has ridden over much of this 
country and Europe on a bicycle without mishap, 
was injured while riding in Washington iast month. 
He tried to avoid running over a street dog and was 
thrown to the pavement and sustained cuts about his 
face and head, and his back was strained. 



128 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

THE, L. A. W. AND GOOD ROADS. 



Sent to St. Louis Good Roads Convention to say 
a word on behalf of the L. A. W., our Secretary- 
Treasurer told the convention what the L. A. W. had 
done in giving birth to the movement for improved 
highways. After telling of the good roads of the 
ancients, the Carthagenians, the Romans, and the 
Incas of Peru, the Secretary came down to the pres- 
ent day and told the convention to what extent they 
were indebted to wheelmen. 

The United States celebrated its hundredth birth- 
day at Philadelphia in 1876, and one of the most at- 
tractive features in the exposition was an exhibit of 
bicycles by an English firm. 

America saw the machine and leaped into the sad- 
dle. It was not until men mounted on wheels which 
they had to push that the real condition of the roads 
was discovered. The horse knew all about it but 
never told. His driver knew very little about roads. 
Wheelmen never asked a team driver about the con- 
dition of this or that road. They looked up another 
wheelman when they wanted the best road to a given 
place. Out of the sorrow of wheelmen came the 
birth of good roads. In 1880 they got together and 
started in to secure their rights to ride on such roads 
as were then in existence. To get the right to ride 
at all took many years and it was not until 1888 that 
we went to work in real earnest to mend our trav- 
eled ways. 

As editor of the L. A. W. publications, I had pub- 
lished in our official organ, a very complete article 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 129 

on Macadam and Telford Roads, by Luther H. 
Porter, of Orange, N. J. The demand tor this article 
was so great that our edition was completely ex- 
hausted. This extraordinary demand determined me 
to write a pamphlet myself. I didn't know anything 
about road-building, but you can always trust a 
newspaper man to fill up and give out on any sub- 
ject. I produced a pamphlet including Porter's 
article and a lot of matter borrowed from men who 
knew all about road building. We sent it to every 
member of every legislature in the country, to road 
surveyors, engineers, commissions, to the press and 
to State officers. We sent out 450,000 of these mis- 
sionaries. The little book was read, we have reason 
to believe, by a large majority of those who received 
it. 

The next year we followed with another pamphlet. 
In 1869 the State of Massachusetts offered a prize of 
a thousand dollars for the best essay on Road Build- 
ing. Clemens Herschel, a well known engineer, 
took the prize. This essay and two others, which 
had been given honorable mention, one by Prof. 
Samuel F. Miller, and one by Henry Onion, were 
buried in the Mass. Agricultural Report of 1869-70. 
We took these essays and put them into book form. 
It was an expensive undertaking and we decided to 
invoke the aid of the cycle manufacturers. Our first 
call was on the late Colonel Albert A. Pope. We 
told him that we wanted his name at the head of the 
list, prefixed to a goodly-sized contribution, as an 
incentive to those whom we should ask to follow. 



130 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

His reply was characteristic. "No matter about the 
others, get out your book and send the bill to me." 
And we did. 

We sent half a million of these books to the list 
used before. After this Isaac B. Potter took charge 
of the highway department. In 1891 was published 
his well known "Gospel of Good Roads," which 
struck 12 o'clock for the public. 

In 1892 we started the Good Roads Magazine 
which we ran ten years. At one time with a circula- 
tion of 120,000. 

These are the agencies employed by the L. A. W. 
in starting the movement for the improvement of 
our highways. They were the initial steps that set 
the people to thinking about roads and calling for 
improvement. It gave the cause a start that nothing 
could restrain. Other people have taken . up the 
work, all profiting by the start given to it by the 
wheelmen of the eighties. 

Our first steps were in the line of education and 
agitation. We went into politics and the wheelmen's 
vote was large enough to be seen by the politician 
without the aid of glasses. The States, led by 
Massachusetts, took hold of the work and Highway 
Commissions were formed. The Government at 
Washington annexed the Bureau of Road Inquiry to 
the Agricultural Department. Soon nearly every 
State had a Highway Department. From this point 
the work has gone bravely on and nothing evidences 
its marvelous growth more than this representative 
convention of men of all interests united for a com- 
mon cause. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 1.31 

The problem you have before you is widely differ- 
ent from that we first encountered. We used to say : 
"Give us good roads and our vehicles will improve 
them. The bicycle leaves a road better than it found 
it." Every wheel was a road roller, smoothing the 
surface for that which followed. 

Today the problem is to keep the roads after they 
are built. The inventive genius of the world is at 
work to secure a good surface that will stand the 
wear and tear of the heavy vehicles now passing 
over it. In the old days Conservatism opposed 
the locomotive for fear it would displace the horse; 
the frightened horse tried in vain to drive the bicycle 
from the highway; Conservatism of today would, if 
allowed, forbid the auto that tears up the macadam. 
But the men of today look ahead and we are bound 
to have roadways to match the traffic. 

The bicycle has not gone out. More bicycles are 
being sold every year. We gave good roads, fitted 
to our purposes, to, the country. They are not the 
roads demanded today, but our roads led the way to 
your roads and we are with you, hand and glove, in 
the movement to supply the highways that are de- 
manded. For your roads shall be our roads and 
wheresoever you shall go you will find us close 
behind. 



Poor students of Birmingham, Eng., who use the 
Central Reference Library, have petitioned the mu- 
nicipal authorities to provide free storage for their 
bicycles while the owners are using the library, as 
is done in several other institutions in the citv. 



132 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Many of the students ride bicycles to save car fare, 
and they point out that they cannot afford to pay 
storage on their mounts night after night while they 
are sudying in the building. 



Three young men of San Jose, CaL, caught riding 
their wheels on the sidewalk, were not fined nor 
jailed. Their wheels were sent to jail for thirty days 
and meanwhile they can walk on the sidewalk. That 
judge was certainly original and perhaps wise. 



Don't mind if the other fellow overtakes and 
passes you, take the curves slowly and keep on the 
right side of the road. This is the only way to come 
home again healthy, happy and intact. 



British motorists hope to bring about an interna- 
tional conference to discuss the question of a uni- 
versal rule of the road. The United Kingdom is the 
only country in Europe, with the exception of Bo- 
hemia, where the left hand rule prevails. "Never- 
theless," says the London correspondent of the Chi- 
cago Daily News, "British experts believe that the 
left hand rule has more to commend it than the other 
and that an international conference would decide in 
its favor. Already Marquis de Dion and other influ- 
ential Frenchmen are advocating the. adoption in 
France of the British custom." 



That the popularity of bicycles is accountable for 
a great decrease in railroad travel in Great Britain 
is indicated by figures recently issued in relation to 
third class traffic. It is supposed that a large part 



BASSE-IT'S SCRAP BOOK 133 

of the 8,000,000 decrease in passengers for the year 
is due to many suburbanites using bicycles in prefer- 
ence to trains to reach their work. 



Referring to the new title of the Bicycling World, 
recalls to us how insistant its one-time proprietor 
was upon the preservation of the old name. In 1883- 
4 and 5 the tricycle was pushing out the bicycle. 
Josiah S. Dean and "us" were conducting the paper 
and we tried to persuade Mr. Hodges to join with 
those who were giving up "Bicycling" for "Cycling." 
The Bicycle Touring Club became the Cyclists' 
Touring Club, and the trade journals were cutting 
out the "Bi." Hodges was obdurate and would not 
be persuaded, and "Bi" it has been ever since. The 
Scrap Book seems to be the only exclusive bicycling 
paper left. 



A new type of sign-board is finding many advo- 
cates among English motorists and motorcyclists 
and their allied publications. It consists of the usual 
arm and hand with the name of the town and dis- 
tance mounted respectively above and below in open, 
cut out letters. As the letters and figures stand out 
in relief against the sky, the sign can be read almost 
as well at night as by day. 



The Bicycling World lowers its ancient title to the 
level of a sub-title, and "The Motorcycle Review" 
becomes the prominent designation. One more 
item to mark the course of events. The motor- 
cyclists are active and are organized. The cyclists 



134 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

are riding alone. *' Tis true, 'tis pity; and pity 'tis 
'tis true." The American Bicycling Journal was es- 
tablished by Frank W. Weston, Dec. 22, 1877. It 
was published semi-occasionally and in the two 
years to Nov. 1, 1879, published 18 numbers. The 
Bicycling World was first issued Nov. 15, 1879, witn 
Charles E. Pratt as editor. It was announced that 
they had taken all rights and property of the journal. 
The same year the publishers combined "The Arch- 
ery Field" with the "Bi World" and ran the two to- 
gether for two years, when the archery annex was 
given up. 



Earnings of the Pope Manufacturing Co. for the 
year ending July 31, 1910, were $745,390.87. These 
earnings are on an authorized capital of $6,500,000, 
of which $5,989,000 is outstanding in preferred and 
common stock, the balance remaining in the treas- 
ury. The net earnings, when added to the surplus of 
$482,866.76 carried over from 1909, make a total of 
$1,228,257.63, out of which dividends amounting to 
$368,054 have been paid, leaving a surplus of $860,- 
203.63. 



We never regarded Robert (Bob) D. Garden as 
an Apollo, and never very handsome for homely; but 
here is how Mary treats him and what she thinks 
of him. She was met at the boat by any number of 
friends, including her father, in whose arms she re- 
mained for at least a full minute, while she kissed 
him with great fervor. Afterward she held him at 
arm's length and exclaimed: 

"Isn't he handsome, mv father?" 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 135 

By the time this issue is being read we hope to 
have our Periodical List in the hands of our friends. 
If they don't want to subscribe it may divert them if 
they will find the cost of magazines. The publishers 
are giving the people a sort of mathematical puzzle 
calculated to produce a headache in the effort to get 
the answer. Send us a list and we will help you to 
the lowest price. 



J. M. Linscott, of Boston^ Mass., who for 20 years 
has been one of New England's most prominent job- 
bers in cycles and accessories, has sold the bicycle 
supply business of the Boston Cycle & Sundry Co. 
to the Hub Cycle Co., 40 Portland St., Boston. The 
latter concern started in a modest way in Boston 
some five or six years ago, and has become a strong 
and aggressive figure in the cycle jobbing field, hav- 
ing a five-story building of its own. 



Steady increases in the number of motorcyclists in 
Massachusetts are shown by the registration figures, 
the list of registered machines on Sept. 1, 1910, giv- 
ing a total of 3,042. This is a gain of 827 over the 
figures on Sept. 1, 1909, when 2,2151 -machines were 
on the registered list. 



An automobile does not prove that a man has 
money, but that he did have. — Judge. 



Jim Nixon went to church last Sunday on his 
steam threshing traction engine. Jim said he had 
got good and derned tired of taking to the ditcfi with 



136 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

his horse and wagon every time he met one of those 
dod-blasted automobiles, and thought he would ride 
down the road in a rig they couldn't jar. — Hedge 
Corners Herald. 



The Board of Trade of Hartford, Conn., is at work 
raising money for the memorial to Colonel Pope. It 
will be a fountain 15 feet high to be located in Pope 
Park. 



We wonder how much you know. We will pub- 
lish the names of any and all who send correct an- 
swers to the following questions, all about the presi- 
dents. 

1. Who said, "A little more grape, Captain 
Bragg."? 

2. Which was the first President inaugurated in 
Washington? 

3. Which President was the first to deliver an 
inaugural in the presence of his mother? 

4. What two Presidents served in the field during 
the Revolution? 

5. Which President was elected by one vote? 

6. Which Presidents signed the Declaration of 
Independence? 

7. Which was the first President who wore a 
mustache? 

8. Which was the first President that was not 
born a British subject? 

9. Which was the first President to bring a bride 
wife to the White House? 

10. Which President was called the "Old Man 
Eloquent"? 



LOCKHART SUSPENDER CO. 

LINCOLN 



Suspenders Garters 

Belts 

1307-09-11 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WM. L. LOCKHART, 
Treasurer 

AUGUSTUS NICKERSON 

Certified 
Public Accountant 

Room 708 Exchange Building 

53 State Street BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Main 3007 



8 

| Broadway Trust 
Company 

754 BROADWAY 



CORNER 



EIGHTH 



STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



Capital, $700,000 
Surplus, $350,000 



8 



8 
8 





OFFICERS: 




FREDERIC G. LEE 


President 


M. M. BELDING, Jr. - 


- Vice-President 


MARKS ANHEIM 


Vice-President 


JOHN W. H. BERGEN - 


- Secretary 


LOUIS S. QUIMBY 


Ass't Secretary 


JOHN D. VAN OLINDA - 


- Ass't Secretary 



»*«*K 



COMPANY 
^UD ROADS 




THE PRICE TO PAY. 

DUES.— Applicants pay 75 cents a year. Memberships may be 
renewed for 75 cents a year. Members may subscribe for the official 
organ at the club rate of 25 cents. This is optional and the sum must 
be paid in addition to the dues. Life membership $10. Can be taken 
by none other than one who has been a member for five years prev- 
ious. Life members must pay the additional fee of 25 cents per year 
for the official organ if they desire it. 



APPLICATION BLANK.— If applicant is unprovided with 
regular blank from headquarters, he may write his name, address and 
occupation on a slip of paper 6 by 3 inches. Add the names of two 
references and send same with one dollar to Abbot Bassett, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. Regular 
blank supplied on application. 



TOURING ABROAD.— Members touring abroad are entitled 
to call upon the Secretary-Treasurer for a ticket of membership in 
the Cyclist Touring Club of England. This ticket will give the 
holder all the advantages of the hotel and consul system which the 
C. T. C. has in Great Britain and on the Continent, and will save 
much trouble at the custom houses, where the ticket will be a 
passport in lieu of a cash deposit. 



SUPPLIES— Badges : Solid gold, $2 ; plated, $1 ; Enameled 
Rim, 75 cents. Russia leather ticket holders, 25 cents. Veteran 
Bar, price #2.50. Screw Driver for Key Ring, 10 cents. 



"The Cheape 



is what COLUMBIA LOC K NUTS have been termer . ., 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 





KBGULAR IMPROVKD 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotcer pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



LOCKHART SUSPENDER CO. 

LINCOLN 



Suspenders Garters 

Belts 

1307-09-11 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WM. L. LOCKHART, 
Treasurer 



BtSSett'SSC"«pBooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OP THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, §1.00 an inch! 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Bostoa 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 8. No. io DECEMBER, 1910 5 Cents 



LAST MONTH OF ALL. 



"What are you buying all that stuff for, old man?" 
"Oh, I am just stocking up for the Christmas 
stocking up." 



Switzerland wishes to revise the Gregorian Calen- 
dar so as to give us a year of exactly fifty-two 
weeks, or 364 days. New Year's is to be an extra, 
and Sunday undated — in fact, as it has long been in 
law, a dies non. 



"If I can just keep from making an ass of my- 
self," is the unique prayer of a newly chosen New 
England college president. The student problem is 
how to avoid being reduced to "ponies." 



He — I wish that I was Santa Claus, my heart I'd 
give you, dear. 

She — I wish that you were Christmas, too; you'd 
come but once a year. 



President Lowell might have talked about the 
"lethal certitude" of Yale's defeat, but he came down 



142 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

to undergraduate vernacular and declared it a "dead 
sure thing." But it wasn't. 



The newest thing is a handle-bar covered with 
black celluloid. 



Jo Pennell, who was one of our founders at New- 
port, has been making a visit to America and has 
been talking. Jo is, and always was, positive and 
aggressive. He doesn't like us, Chicago is the "City 
dirtiful," and Philadelphia has much in it that is vul- 
gar. Same old Jo. He didn't get over to Boston 
and it is lucky for us that he didn't see our elevated 
railroad that runs under ground. 



The Nylaw will hold its quarterly dinner in New 
York City Dec. 17. On this occasion the L. A. W. 
Secretary-Treasurer will be the honorary guest of 
the occasion. 



Another old-timer dismounted. Peter Gendron, 
old-time maker of the Gendron wheel, died in 
Toledo, Ohio, last month. 



Rubber having been on the bounce is coming 
down again. Now more people will be able to 
catch it. 



December's here ! Cold winter reigns ; good cheer 
makes us forget its chills; our hearts are full of 
Christmas loves; our minds are full of Christmas 
bills. 



,-< 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 14 3 

At a meeting of the National Century Road Club 
Association, it was decided to hold the annual New 
Year's eve race from Bedford Rest, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., to Valley Stream, Long Island, making a dis- 
tance of 15 miles. The race is for a silver loving 
cup, known as the Jones Trophy, and must be won 
three times for permanent possession. 



The fourth Saturday in January has been decided 
on by the Century Road Club Association as the day 
on which the annual dinner will be held each year. 
In line with this decision the members will assemble 
at the Broadway Central Hotel, Broadway and 
Third Street, New York City, for the dinner which 
will be served there on Jan. 28, 191 1. Arrangements 
have been made for an excellent meal at $1.50 a 
plate. 



Elmer E. Brown, for many years a cycle dealer 
on Columbus Ave., Boston, died on Sunday, Oct. 
30. He was a familiar presence in the trade an«i 
among club men. And now "Lon" Peck is the only 
dealer left of all that company that fringed cycle row 
of Boston. 



Two people riding tandem on a single bicycle or 
motor is dangerous, according to a jury in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and a request has been made that a 
police ordinance be passed prohibiting it in the 
future. The proverb commends him who makes two 
blades of grass grow where one grew before, but it 
has nothing to say of the additional fellow placed 



144 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

where only one should be. There are wheels enough 
for all. 



No longer will it be necessary for motorcyclists in 
Indianapolis, Ind., to take out a license in order to 
operate their machines on the streets of that city, 
as the ordinance compelling such licenses has been 
declared invalid by Judge Remster, in the circuit 
court. The offensive tag may now be taken off. 



A. D. Meiselbach, one of the first cycle manufac- 
turers to make department-store bicycles on a large 
scale, is planning to re-enter the field, after having 
retired from it in 1899, when his plant was taken 
over by the American Bicycle Co. He is organizing 
a company in North Milwaukee, Wis., where his 
former plant was located, and is to incorporate it 
shortly under the name of the A. D. Meiselbach Co., 
with a capitalization of $250,000. The North Mil- 
waukee Citizens' Advancement Association is assist- 
ing the new company to secure a factory site. 



Buffalo election returns were hastened by the 
bicycle in Buffalo, N. Y., where each year the Ram- 
bler Bicycle Club, of that city, makes arrangements, 
through its captains, to carry the returns on their 
machines. Club members take such an interest in 
the matter that a full turnout was at hand. 



One of the most unusual accidents that can fall to 
the lot of a bicycle rider occurred in Birmingham, 
Eng\, last week when a cyclist was the victim of a 
particularly strong gust of wind. The wind literally 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 145 

lifted his machine out of its course and put it in the 
way of a hay wagon, by which the cyclist was 
knocked down. His machine was smashed, and the 
wagon passed over him. He sustained a fractured 
thigh. 



Earl Norton, a young cyclist, recently was at- 
tacked by a young wildcat while riding across the 
Field ranch at Laguna Seca, Cal., and it took con- 
siderable work with a providentially handy fence rail 
to dispatch it. Upon the animal being examined in 
town later, it measured three feet from tip to tip and 
appeared to be about a year old. 



F. H. Elliott, the secretary of the American Auto- 
mobile Association, at a dinner in New York, 
laughed over some of the absurd claims made against 
automobilists. 

"If an automobile runs over a pig," he said, "it is 
sure to be a blooded Berkshire. Every chicken 
slaughtered is a pedigreed bird worth $40 or $50. A 
yellow barnyard cur is a wire-haired fox terrier. A 
calf is always of Alderney or Guernsey blood." 

Mr. Elliott smiled. 

"To tell the truth," he said, "nothing seems to im- 
prove live stock like crossing it with an automobile." 



Our good friend and L. A. W. member, Henry 
Glentworth Wynn of New York, will have the sym- 
pathy of us all in his bereavement by the death of 
his wife, Marie Elizabeth Stewart Wynn, Nov. 18, 
19 10. 



146 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Such is his interest in bicycles, an ingenious 
Frenchman has used cycle parts for building a gigan- 
tic clock. Standing twelve feet high, the frame work 
is a huge bicycle wheel surrounded by twelve ordi- 
nary sized wheels with pneumatic tires. The figures, 
which are formed crank rods, are supported by a 
rim within the large wheel. The minute points are of 
small nickel plated parts, while the hands are of 
frame tubing. An arrangement of handlebars forms 
the top of the clock, while the pendulum is made of 
bicycle parts. Bicycle bells strike the hours and 
quarter hours. 



American motorists will read with satisfaction of 
the more liberal regulations toward their clan in 
Great Britain. The special license fee which has 
been imposed will now be adandoned. Automobiles 
brought into the kingdom for the use of foreigners 
will not have to pay excise duty unless they are to 
remain longer than four months. 

"Europe, to give its best," said Mr. Higgins, 
"must be taken slowly. Once, in an Italian picture 
gallery, I heard one broad-shouldered woman ask 
another: 

" Ts this Florence or Venice?' 

" 'What day's today?' the other asked in turn. 

" 'Wednesdav.' 

" Then it's Florence/ " 



Wolzendorf of St. Louis:— On Friday evening, 
November 18, some thirtv members of the St. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 147 

Louis Cycling Club sat down to a fine dinner at Van 
Horn's cafe to celebrate the silver anniversary oi 
the marriage of H. G. Wolzendorf to the bicycle. 
Van Horn being one of the most enthusiastic mem- 
bers of the club, it is quite needless to remark that 
to all intents and purposes his restaurant was for the 
time being part and parcel of the club. 

"Dorfe," as he has been known ever since he 
made his "debut" a quarter of a century ago, did not 
know the purpose of the function until he noticed 
one of the artistic invitations that had been mailed 
to the members lying beside his plate. In opening 
the ceremonies, President Beckmann paid him a 
glowing tribute for the long, faithful and valuable 
services that he had rendered St. Louis wheelmen. 
As Wolzendorf has always avoided holding office 
when he could help it, he never was as prominent 
in the hey-dey of the sport as he might have been. 
But in St. Louis he has always been the real Nestor 
among cyclists. His wise counsel has always been 
sought on all things that had a vital bearing on 
things cycling, and his advice has usually been fol- 
lowed. During the periods that the sport dwindled 
to almost insignificance, it was always good old 
"Dorfe" that managed to hold together at least a 
few of the faithful and thus preserve the St. Louis 
Cycling Club. "Dorfe's" droll humor has a charac- 
teristic all its own and it has always been a treat to 
listen to his accounts of runs and tours. In club 
meeting he has a fashion of sitting in a back seat 
peacefully smoking away at his pipe. Sometimes 
there is the most animated discussion but "Dorfe" 



148 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

is in a semi-comatose condition until the chairman 
puts the motion. Then he will ask that the motion 
please be repeated and then either assents his ap- 
proval, or explains his disapproval. The vote nearly 
always is in accord with his views. 

Wolzendorf got his cycling inspiration shortly 
after the civil war, when as a boy he saw some 
velocipedes ridden around on the flagstone pave- 
ment surrounding the court house. His first ambi- 
tions to ride came to naught after a few rather dis- 
astrous experiences in trying to master the unruly 
ordinary, whereupon he resolved that rough 
macadam streets and a bicycle were a poor com- 
bination at least for a near sighted individual. When 
he first beheld the star, he regarded that as a much 
safer contrivance and soon thereafter was a most 
enthusiastic rider and a most familiar character. 

One of his characteristic traits is his old fashioned- 
ness. It is said he did not come down from the 
high machine to the safety until he had to. As long 
as can be remembered he has been using the same 
style handle bar and saddle. He buys a new wheel 
every two years and the dealer is always instructed 
to duplicate the old one as nearly as possible. He 
has never used toe clips or the coaster brake and in 
all probability never will. 

Every one of the twenty-five years that he has 
ridden, he has been a consistent road rider, and every 
Sunday he can be found out on the road with the 
"£ an &" viewing much of the scenery that he first 
saw a quarter of a century ago. Almost all of his 
vacations have been spent by cycling in various parts 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 149 

of the country, and it can almost be said that he can 
relate cycling experiences from Maine to Mexico, 
and from Oregon to Florida. 

On the road he is always the "boss." Once a 
party of St. Louis riders were being led through the 
White Mountains by some Easterners. Finally the 
tourmaster bade all dismount, and recommended 
that the party walk down a very steep hill. "Dorfe" 
merely mumbled, "I've seen many a hill that I've 
had to walk up, but I'll be damned if I've ever seen 
one that I've had to walk down," whereupon he 
stuck his feet in the frame and coasted on with the 
St. Louis "gang" closely following. 

At the close of the banquet "Dorfe" was once 
more surprised when he was handed a package con- 
taining a gold watch charm bearing the familiar 
club emblem, a white maltese cross on a navy blue 
background. 



We received a few answers to our "President" 
queries, but none were complete. One answer from 
Owen Lawson, of Louisville, would seem to put us 
in the wrong ourselves regarding one answer. 

"A conscientious regard for historical fact makes 
it necessary to point out that the first of your ques- 
tions concerning presidents, appearing on page 136 
of the Scrap Book for November, is founded on a 
fabrication, so declared by no less authority than 
General Bragg himself. It is related that at a 
dinner party in New York, several years after the 
Mexican war, General Bragg was asked as to the 
truth of the story in which General Taylor is said 



150 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

to have used the expression, 'A little more grape, 
Captain Bragg/ According to his story, General 
Taylor rode up to Bragg's battery during the fight 
and, after noting the results of two or three well 
placed shots, turned to Bragg and, with a grim 
smile, said 'G-G-Give 'em Hell, B-B-Braxton.' Thus 
does Truth, crushed by the weight of Historical 
Error, rise to defy the entire Ananias Club. That 
grape story never did sound natural, anyway." 



Zachary Taylor. 



Jefferson. 
Garfield. 

Washington and Monroe. 
Monroe. 

J. Adams and Jefferson. 
Grant. 
Van Bur en. 
Tyler. 
10. J. Q. Adams. 



The automobile has other victims than those it 
runs down, or catapults over stone walls and against 
trees. There are victims of rides insisted upon by 
hospitable owners wishing -to entertain guests from 
town who have arrived in their best bibs and tuckers 
to spend the day and be company, whereat they are 
bundled into a car, expensive hats protected by a 
veil and new gowns covered by borrowed automobile 
coats, to be swished through miles of dust and 
obliged to call it pleasure! *Tis a selfish world. 
Given a 191 1 car, with all the latest frills, why 
shouldn't Miss Glad Rags "love" to take a spin 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 151 

through the scenery she can't see? Of course, the 
damage done to her attire shouldn't be the least 
matter. She is Miss Sad Rags at the end of that 
"perfect ride," the worst of it being a walk of half 
a mile when something went bad with one wheel! 
But one must suffer to be beautiful, and likewise to 
ride in automobiles. 



NATIONAL ASSEMBLY DELEGATES. 



Under the Constitution, L. A. W. f the basis of repre- 
sentation in the National Assembly must be made from 
the membership Dec. i, in each year. 

The membership Dec. I, 1910, gives to the States the 
number of representatives as below set forth: 

Calif., 1; Colo., 1; Conn., 2; D. C, 1; 111., 2; Ind., 1; 
la., 1; Ky., 1; Me., 1; Md., 1; Mass., 10; Mich., 1; Minn., 1; 
Mo., 1; N. H., 1; N. J., 4; N. Y, 13; O., 2; Pa., 10; R. I., 
2; Tex., 1; Wis., 1; Total, 59. 

Article V of the Constitution provides for the nomina- 
tion of candidates. 

Sec. 2. Nominations for the office of representative may 
be made by not less than five members, who shall file the 
same with the Secretary-Treasurer during the month of 
January. 

The election takes place in March. 

ABBOT BASSETT, Sec.-Treas. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 



We are sending out a 45-page catalogue which gives a 
complete list of periodicals with club prices and discounts 
on single subscriptions. A postal-card request will bring 
it to anyone who would like to consult it. In addition to 
a price list there are brief descriptions of what the maga- 
zines stand for, and the whole list is grouped under desig- 
nations which indicate their purpose. The club idea pre- 
dominates and while discounts are liberal on two or more 



152 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

magazines, a large majority of the publishers insist on no : 
discount on single subscriptions. 

There are many combinations to be made beyond those 
which the casual reader can discover. If patrons will send 
us a list of magazines desired we will give the best prices 
to be obtained. 

Below is a list of some of the more popular magazines 
where we can discount on a single subscription 

List. Our Price J 

American Magazine $1.50 $1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Century Magazine 4.00 3.85 

Century and St. Nicholas (new) 7.00 5.60 

Current Events 40 .35 

Good Roads Magazine 1.00 .90 

Green Bag 3.00 2.65 

Horseless Age 2.00 1.75 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 1.75 

Out-Door Life 1.50 1.35 

Philistine 1.00 .85 

Puck 5.00 4.50 

St. Nicholas (renewal; 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American (renewal) 3.00 2.75 

Scientific & Supplement 7.00 ^ 6.00 

The list below gives the more popular magazines which 
are not sold for less than list prices unless two or more 
are taken. These can be sent to one address or to a differ- 
ent address for each magazine. 

List. In Clubs. 

Ainslee's Magazine $1.80 $1.10 

American Boy 1.00 .85 

American Magazine 1.50 1.00 

Atlantic Monthly . . . . 4.00 3.85 

Automobile 300 2.35 

Base Ball Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Blue Book 1.50 1.35 

Bookman 2.50 2.40 

Book News Monthly 1.00 .85 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 .85 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 153 

List. In Clubs. 

Camera Craft (new) i.oo .85 

Children's Magazine 1.00 .85 

Columbian 1.50 1.00 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 .85 

Country Life 4.00 3.25 

Current Literature 3.00 1.75 

Cycle & Auto Trade Journal 2.00 1.60 

Delineator 1.00 .80 • 

Etude for Music Lovers 1.50 1.10 

Everybody's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Garden Magazine 1.50 1,10 

Good Housekeeping 1.25 1.00 

Hampton's Magazine 1.50 1.10 - 

Harper's Bazar 1.25 1.00 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Human Life 1.00 .85 

Independent 3.00 1.75 

Judge *. 5.00 4.50 

Kindergarten Review 1.00 .75 

Kindergarten Primary Magazine 1.00 .95 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 4.00 

Lippinco.tt's 2.50 1.75 

Little Folks 1.00 .85 

McCall's Magazine 50 .45 

McClure's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Metropolitan 1.50 1.00 

Modern Priscilla 75 .60 

Motor Age 3.00 2.35 

Motor Boating 1.00 .85 

Musician 1.50 1.10 

National Magazine 1.50 1.10 

New England Magazine 1.50 1.40 

N. A. Review 4.00 3.50 

Outing Magazine 3.00 2.35 

Pearson's Magazine 1.50 1.00 

Photo Era 1.50 1.10 

Photographic Times 1.50 1.35 

Physical Culture 1.50 1.25 



154 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

List. In Clubs. 

Primary Education 1.25 no 

Recreation 3.00 1.75 

Red Book 1.50 1.35 

Review of Reviews 3.00 1.75 

St. Nicholas (new) 3.00 1.75 

Scientific American (new) 3.00 2.00 

Smart Set 3.00 2.00 

Smith's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Suburban Life 3.00 2.25 

Table Talk 1.00 .85 

Technical World 1.50 1.10 

Vogue 4.00 3.50 

Woman's Home Companion 1.50 1.10 

World Today 1.50 1.10 

World's Work 300 1.85 

Many magazines, notably Scribner's, Ladies' Home 
Journal, Saturday Evening Post, Youth's Companion, the 
Munsey list do not allow a discount. We can supply these 
at publishers' prices. 

AUGUSTUS NICKERSON 

Certified 
Public Accountant 

Room 708 Exchange Building 

53 State Street BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Main 3007 




< A GOOD COMPANY 
on GOOD ROADS 



THE PRICE TO PAY. 

DUES. — Applicants pay 75 cents a year. Memberships may be 
renewed for 75 cents a year. Members may subscribe for the official 
organ at the club rate of 25 cents. This is optional and the sum must 
be paid in addition to the dues. Life membership $10. Can be taken 
by none other than one who has been a member for five years prev- 
ious. Life members must pay the additional fee of 25 cents per year 
for the official organ if they desire it. 



APPLICATION BLANK.— If applicant is unprovided with 
regular blank from headquarters, he may write his name, address and 
occupation on a slip of paper 6 by 3 inches. Add the names of two 
references and send same with one dollar to Abbot Bassett, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. Regular 
blank supplied on application. 



TOURING ABROAD.— Members touring abroad are entitled 
to call upon the Secretary-Treasurer for a ticket of membership in 
the Cyclist Touring Club of England. This ticket will give the 
holder all the advantages of the hotel and consul system which the 
C. T. C. has in Great Britain and on the Continent, and will save 
much trouble at the custom houses, where the ticket will be a 
passport in lieu of a cash deposit. — 



SUPPLIES— Badges : Solid gold, $2 ; plated, $1 ; Enameled 
Rim, 75 cents. Russia leather ticket holders, 25 cents. Veteran 
Bar, price $2.50. Screw* Driver for Key Ring, 10 cents. 




44 The Cheapest Life Insurance" 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
■who knows their- value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 



ipiifl 



RBGULA.R IMPKOVKD 

NoUike other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



LOCKHART SUSPENDER CO. 

LINCOLN 



Suspenders Garters 

Belts 

1307-09-11 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WM. L. LOCKHART, 
Treasurer 



Bassett'S Scrap Boof* 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OP THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-claas 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :— #1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch. 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Vol. 8. No. ii JANUARY, 191 1 5 Cents 



WE TURN UP THREE OF A KIND. 



We haven't had a three of a kind year, till now, 
since ii 



The game of poker will be in vogue this year. 



It doesn't disturb the average poet any to be put 
in the same class with a lvre. 



Hope holds up more than suspenders. 



However, don't call a spade a spade when it's a 
shovel. 



In standing up for your rights don't sit down too 
heavily on others. 



Thomas Humber, a pioneer of the English cycle 
industry, died on November 24, at the age of 60 
years. He was a pioneer in the building of both high 
and safety bicycles, and it was largely through his 
experiments, efforts and persistence that they were 
so far improved as to become practical road ma- 
chines. He led the way in many of the new forms of 



156 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

bicycle and tricycle that were put out in the first 
days of the industry. The word "Humber" came to 
mean "the best." 



Over 80,000 people attended the recent Olympia 
bicycle and motorcycle show in London, according 
to figures just made public. So well pleased are the 
promoters with the success of the exhibition that 
they have decided to make it an annual function for 
the next two or three years at least. 



Returning from abroad, Benjamin Briscoe, presi- 
dent of the United States Motor Co., a merger of 
large automobile manufacturing companies, reports 
that the bicycle industry in Great Britain is in a 
thriving condition. From authoritative figures he 
learned that there will be no less than 600,000 bicy- 
cles built in England during the coming year. 

He — They say that the face is an index of the 
mind. 

She — I don't know. It doesn't follow because a 
woman's face is made up that her mind is. 



After all, the naked truth is preferable to truth 
clothed in improper language. 



"Have you seen Frank?" 

"Frank who?" 

"Frankfurter." 

"Yes, he was talking with Sauce." 

''Sauce who?" 

"Sausage!" 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 157 

BREAKLESS. 

Oh, for a breakless resolution, 

For a high resolve that's strong, 

That won't let go 

Under any old blow 

And send us to the wrong. 

We want a resolution as strong 

As any strong drink that ever flowed, 

That won't even bend 

To a thirsty friend 

Or weaken at the heaviest load. 

We want a resolution as strong 

As the strongest cigar that's made, 

That won't give way 

To the human clay 

In whatever guise arrayed. 

We want a resolution so strong, 

So strong — so strong — well, say, 

We want it so strong 

And to last so long 

They never can build it that way. 



"Why do you always put a pitcher of water and 
a glass on the table before an orator?" 

"That," said the chairman of many reception com- 
mittees, "is to give him something to do in case he 
forgets his piece and has to stop and think." 



How very few days a man wprks, after all. There 
are 365 days in a year. Of these 52 are Sundays, 9 
are holidays, 14 days are vacation and the 52 half- 
holidays amount to 26 whole days. Now if we add 
we find we have 101 days to be taken from 365, leav- 
ing 264 days in all. Under the 8-hour law we multi- 
ply the 264 days by 8, the number of hours, and we 
find that in a year we work 2,112 hours in a year. 



158 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Now a day is 24 hours long, and dividing our total 
of hours by 24 we find that we work but 88 days in 
a whole year. The school teacher who works 25 
hours a week during but 40 weeks really works but 
41 days in every year. Did you ever think of that? 



January is the month for new resolves, and there 
are plenty to be found in the "Prayers and Medita- 
tions" of the famous dictionary-maker, Johnson. 

It is a very human book, showing a man who fails 
as often as he makes new resolutions. 

"I -have," says Johnson, "resolved till I am afraid 
to resolve again. . . . Every man naturally per- 
suades himself that he can keep his resolutions, nor 
is he convinced of his imbecility but by length of 
time and frequency of experiment." 

Writing in 1761, Dr. Johnson says: "My purpose 
is: 

'To avoid idleness. 

"To regulate my sleep as to length and choice of 
hours. 

"To set down every day what shall be done the day 
following. 

"To keep a journal. 

"To worship God more diligently. 

"To go to church every Sunday. 

"To study the Scriptures. 

"To read a certain portion every week." 

Eight years later Johnson was still forming reso- 
lutions, and on New Year's Day, 1769, he writes: 

"I am now about to begin another year. I am not 
yet in a state to form many resolutions. I purpose 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 159 

and hope to rise early in the morning — at eight, and 
by degrees at six, eight being the latest hour to 
which bedtime can be properly extended, and six the 
earliest hour that the present system of life re- 
quires." 

Johnson was then sixty. 



Taking a method unusual in politics, Attorney 
John V. O'Brien, of New Haven, Conn., made a tour 
of the state on a bicycle in the interest of his candi- 
dacy for the assistant clerkship of the house of rep- 
resentatives. Regardless of the success of his un- 
dertaking he had a good ride. 



The Nylaw held its December meeting at the New 
York Athletic Club, Manhattan, on Saturday even- 
ing, Dec. 17. The special guest of the occasion was 
Mr. Bassett, who completes his twenty-fourth year 
as Secretary-Treasurer of League on Jan. 17, 191 1. 
There was gathered the largest attendance of mem- 
bers that he club has known at its quarterly meet- 
ings. Charles F. Cossum came down from Pough- 
keepsie; R. D. Webster took the long journey from 
Elmira; C. Lee Abell, of BuffalOj crossed the State, 
and all the boroughs of Greater New York were rep- 
resented. President Wm. H. Hale presided at the 
banquet and at the annual meeting which followed. 
It was a most social and a very jolly occasion. These 
men had all of them been under the influences of the 
wheel, than which no inanimate object has been 
known to promote a greater degree of good fellow- 
ship. One gets a liberal education in kindliness and 



160 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

good cheer when he has been associated for any 
length of time with riders of the wheel, and no one 
knows this any better than the special guest of this 
occasion. 

There were speeches after dinner and the guest of 
the evening was introduced by President Hale with 
the following bit of verse: — 

THE ABBOT OF BOSTON TOWN. 

There lives an Abbot in Boston Town, 

A wise old Abbot of great renown, 

Whose eyes are keen though his hair is gray, 

Whose soul is young and whose heart is gay. 

This good gray Abbot of Boston Town, 
Whose bearded face never wears a frown, 
His vows ne'er gave to a Pope, they say, 
Save the wheelmen's Pope, Colonel Albert A. 

Our fair round Abbot he wears no gown, 
Upon his head is no shaven crown, 
No churchman he, but one of the boys, 
And always ready to share their joys. 

So our good Abbot has journeyed down, 
And brought from his home in Boston Town, 
A firm hand-clasp and a word of cheer 
To the NYLAW clan assembled here. 

Welcome the Abbot of Boston Town! 
Welcome our Abbot of great renown! 
And here's a toast, boys, drink it down; 
Long life to the Abbot of Boston Town! 

The Abbot didn't try to make a speech but he 
talked for a while giving reminiscences which in- 
cluded a few facts regarding his first election as Sec- 
retary in 1887, at which but one other than himself 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 161 

of those present participated. Wm. M. Frisbie, then 
of New Haven, was the other. The speaker gave 
some account of his trip to St. Louis and his ex- 
periences at the Good Roads Convention. 

Wm. M. Frisbie spoke a few pleasant words. The 
reference to the election of Secretary brought out a 
show of cards. Frisbie scored lowest with number 7 
and the Secretary came next with 49. 

After the meeting came the annual election of of- 
ficers. The following were elected: — - 

President, Jarvis C. Howard, New Rochelle. 

Vice-President, EL F. Hill, Peekskill. 

Secretary, L. P. Cowell, Manhattan. 

It was voted to have but three meetings a year in 
future and it was practically decided that the spring 
meeting would be at Albany and the fall meeting at 
Poughkeepsie. 

The meeting passed into an informal social occa- 
sion which was highly enjoyed. 

Thus passed into history a most delightful occa- 
sion. It is one of many such that the Nylaw has 
promoted and enjoyed. If New York can do it why 
not other cities who have within their borders a lot 
of "has been wheelmen?" 



President Atwater looked in upon us the other 
day. He didn't come as an Auditor to see if the 
books were kept properly, nor did he come to see 
if the League treasury was intact. He evidently 
came to see if our stomach was as full as it should 
be, and, finding it empty, he took it to a place where 
it was filled and made comfortable. 



162 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Congressman Weeks of Massachusetts declared 
himself absolutely opposed to the national good 
roads movement in~an address before the Massachu- 
setts Highway Association. "Many people in the 
country," he said, "see in the national treasury a 
panacea for all ills. They see the desirability of 
good roads and immediately rush to the National 
Government and ask it to furnish them. Highways 
are local facilities even in these days of the auto- 
mobile and should be confined to the States. We 
will take care of our highways in Massachusetts, but 
we should not be asked to help build roads in Ne- 
vada or California." 

Mr. Weeks declared that the expense of national 
road control would exceed that of the Civil War, 
and announced that if such a bill were presented in 
Congress he would seek to have it amended so that 
Massachusetts should be reimbursed for what has 
been spent here for good roads. Massachusetts, he 
said, is as far ahead of the rest of the country in 
roads as she is in every other public facility. He 
asked the association to express itself distinctly on 
the proposition and add its weight against the move- 
ment to nationalize roads. 

But why not make the towns and cities of Massa- 
chusetts build the roads? Simply they can't afford 
to do it and the State steps in to help them. Massa- 
chusetts is a wealthy community. It has material 
easily at hand for road building. The States of large 
area in the South and West cannot afford to build 
such roads as Massachusetts has unless they have 
help. As well may Mr. Weeks call upon the towns 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 163 

and cities of Massachusetts to reimburse the State. 
The Congressman should take another look at the 
situation. 



Most of our readers will have already learned with 
pride, through the columns of the general press, the 
pleasing intelligence that His Majesty King George 
has been graciously pleased to become the Patron of 
our Glub. He is the first and only patron the Club 
has had since its creation thirty-two years ago, and 
the announcement is rendered all the more pleasing 
by the fact that His Majesty is a thoroughly practical 
cyclist himself, and the father of a family of cyclists," 
as well as the most traveled occupant of a throne, 
for our Club has ever been of a typically British 
practical turn of mind. Incidentally this mark of 
Royal favor may be taken as evidence that the old 
Club continues to maintain its vitality and prestige. — 
C. T. C. Gazette. 



Harmony among States in the development of a 
great national system of highways is the aim of the 
American Association for Highways Improvement 
formed at a meeting of men of national reputation. 
The association responds to the movement for bet- 
ter roads, to take the roads problem out of politics, 
to install expert supervision and to broaden the 
purely local aspect of good roads into the develop- 
ment of a countrywide system. Membership in the 
new organization is based upon acceptance of the 
application forwarded to its secretary and the pay- 
ment of $100 dues by sustaining members and $5 by 



164 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

regular members. Annual meetings are to be held. 
There is a board of directors with wide powers. 

James S. Harlan, member of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, was temporary chairman of the 
meeting; W. W. Finley, president of the Southern 
Railway; B. F. Yoakum," Alfred Noble and Lafayette 
Young are the members of the executive committee. 
Logan W. Page, director of the burau of public 
roads, was elected president and headquarters will 
be established in Washington. 

Other officers and the board of directors are: Vice- 
president, W. C. Brown; treasurer, Lee McClung; 
secretary, J. R. Pennypacker, Jr.; organizer, W. D. 
Brown; board of directors, Louis Hill (chairman), 
James McCrea, H. W. Finney, B. F. Yoakum, L. 
W. Page, Dr. E. J. James, E. D. Chapin, Bryan 
Lathrop, John Goodefi. Melville E, Stone, Walter 
Page, Alfred Noble, Leonard Tufts, Lafayette 
Young, W. C. Brown, Joseph W. Jones, John A. 
Stewart, Lee McClung, James S. Harlan, Robert P. 
Hooper, George C. Diehl, A. G. Spalding, C. S. Bar- 
rett, Clarence Wilson, J. E. Pennypacker, Jr. 

The object of the association as shown by its con- 
stitution is "to harmonize and correlate all efforts 
for the improvement of the public roads to the end 
that adequate and sufficient systems of road con- 
struction, administration and maintenance may be 
adopted in all the States." 



Like the American cities where the count has 
been taken, bicycles enormously outnumber auto- 
mobiles in Paris, France, despite the fact that the 
casual sidewalk observer would venture to say that 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 165 

the horse drawn and motor vehicles in the French 
capital are so numerous that it would appear impos- 
sible that bicycles should overtop them. As against 
the 50,000 lorries and delivery vans and the 14,540 
cabs of all classes, the official registration figures 
show 261,723 bicycles and 5,256 motorcycles. 



Senator Crane of Massachusetts, at a luncheon in 
Dalton, praised compromise. 

"Compromise is a good thing," he said. "Take 
the case of a young Dalton builder. He got mar- 
ried about a year ago, and after* the marriage he and 
his wife had an interminable dispute as to whether 
they should buy two motorcycles or a five-horse- 
power runabout suitable to their means. He said 
the other day: 

" 'My wife and I wrangled for months and months, 
but, thank goodness, we've compromised at last/ 

" What have you compromised on?' I asked. 

" 'A baby carriage/ he answered, with a proud, 
glad smile/' 



It will please the little ones to know that a Chicago 
judge has decided that children are a necessity. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 



We are sending out a 45-page catalogue which gives a 
complete list of periodicals with club prices and discounts 
on single subscriptions. A postal-card request will bring 
it to anyone who would like to consult it. In addition to 
a price list there are brief descriptions of what the maga- 
zines stand for, and the whole list is grouped under desig- 
nations which indicate their purpose. The club idea pre- 



166 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

dominates and while discounts are liberal on two or more 
magazines, a large majority of the publishers insist on no 
discount on single subscriptions. 

There are many combinations to be made beyond those 
which the casual reader can discover. If patrons will send 
us a list of magazines desired we will give the best prices 
to be obtained. 

Below is a list of some of the more popular magazines 
where we can discount on a single subscription 

List. Our Price. 

American Magazine $1.50 $1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Century Magazine 4.00 3.85 

Century and St. Nicholas (new) 7.00 5.60 

Current Events 40 .35 

Good Roads Magazine 1.00 .90 

Green Bag 3.00 2.65 

Horseless Age 2.00 1.75 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 1.75 

Out-Door Life 1.50 1.35 

Philistine 1.00 .85 

Puck 5.00 4.50 

St. Nicholas (renewal) 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American (renewal) 3.00 2.75 

Scientific & Supplement 7.00 6.00 

The list below gives the more popular magazines which 
are not sold for less than list prices unless two or more 
are taken. These can be sent to one address or to a differ- 
ent address for each magazine. 

List. In Clubs. 

Ainslee's Magazine $1.80 $1.10 

American Boy 1.00 .85 

American Magazine 1.50 1.00 

Atlantic Monthly 4.00 3.85 

Automobile 3.00 2.35 

Base Ball Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Blue Book 1.50 1.35 

Bookman i 2.50 2.40 

Book News Monthly 1.00 .85 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 .85 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 167 

List. In Clubs. 

Camera Craft (new) i.oo .85 

Children's Magazine 1.00 .85 

Columbian 1.50 1.00 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 .85 

Country Life 4.00 3.25 

Current Literature 3.00 1.75 

Cycle & Auto Trade Journal 2.00 1.60 

Delineator 1.00 .80 

Etude for Music Lovers 1.50 1.10 

Everybody's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Garden Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Good Housekeeping 1.25 1.00 

Hampton's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Harper's Bazar 1.25 1.00 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3.50 

Human Life 1.00 .85 

Independent 3.00 1.75 

Judge 5.00 4.50 

Kindergarten Review 1.00 .75 

Kindergarten Primary Magazine 1.00 .95 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 4.00 

Lippincott's 2.50 1.75 

Little Folks 1.00 .85 

McCall's Magazine 50 .45 

McClure's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Metropolitan 1.50 1.00 

Modern Priscilla 75 .60 

Motor Age 3.00 2.35 

Motor Boating 1.00 .85 

Musician 1.50 1.10 

National Magazine 1.50 1.10 

New England Magazine 1.50 1.40 

N. A. Review 4.00 3.50 

Outing Magazine 3.00 2.35 

Pearson's Magazine 1.50 1.00 

Photo Era 1.50 1.10 

Photographic Times 1.50 1.35 

Physical Culture 1.50 1.25 



168 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

List. In Clubs. 

Primary Education 1.25 1.10 

Recreation 3.00 1.75 

Red Book 1.50 1.35 

Review of Reviews 3.00 1.75 

St. Nicholas (new) 3.00 1.75 

Scientific American (new) 3.00 2.00 

Smart Set 3.00 2.00 

Smith's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Suburban Life 3.00 2.25 

Table Talk 1.00 .85 

Technical World 1.50 1.10 

Vogue 4.00 3.50 

Woman's Home Companion 1.50 1.10 

World Today 1.50 1.10 

World's Work 300 1.85 

Many magazines, notably Scribner's, Ladies' Home 
Journal, Saturday Evening Post, Youth's Companion, the 
Munsey list do not allow a discount. We can supply these 
at publishers' prices. 

AUGUSTUS NICKERSON 

Certified 
Public Accountant 

Room 708 Exchange Building 

53 State Street BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Main 3007 



Bassett'S Scrap BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OP THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

.A. magazine that Is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, #1.00 an inch: 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. n 

Vol. 8. No. 7 SEPTEMBER, 1910 5 Cents 



THE BELLS OF SEPTEMBER ARE RINGING 
"COME HOME/' 



The ninth month of the year, reckoned from Jan- 
uary, and the seventh from March, whence its name, 
from septimus, seventh. It became the ninth month 
when January and February were added to the year 
by Numa, 713 B. C. The Roman senate would have 
given this month the name of Tiberius, but that em- 
peror opposed it; the emperor Domitian gave it his 
own name, Germanicus; the senate under Antoninus 
Pius gave it that of Antoninus; Commodus gave it 
his surname, Herculeus; and the emperor Tacitus 
his own name, Tacitus. But these appellations are 
all gone into disuse. 



Our new President, Fred Atwater, hails from 
Bridgeport, Conn. If you have an idea that Bridge- 
porfis a small place just take a look at the popula- 
tion as per the last census: — Bridgeport, 102,000; 
Hartford, 99,000. 



Connecticut has given us three presidents: — 



98 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Col. Chas. L. Burdett, 1892 and 1893; Wm. A, 
Howell, 1902; Fred Atwater, 1910. 



Jack Prince, the veteran board track constructor, 
has announced that he will soon begin work on the 
construction of another speed bowl at Portland, 
Ore., to add another link to the chain of courses 
which he is forging in the West. Prince says that 
it will be ready before the close of the Salt Lake 
season about the middle of September and that im- 
mediately following its opening he will start work on 
still another saucer at Oakland, Cal. These, with 
Los Angeles and Salt Lake, will form the nucleus of 
a four track circuit which Prince is planning and 
which he hopes to keep in operation the year round. 



Postmaster Smith, of Middleboro, Mass., had, 
last month, a trying experience with a big black 
snake while he was riding his bicycle on the country 
roads to Rocky Meadow. 

Smith felt his wheel bump over something, but he 
did not have time to look to see what it was before 
he felt a grip about his foot. The snake had coiled 
through the frame of the bicycle and had caught 
the rider by the ankle. 

Smith jumped from, the wheel and managed to 
shake the snake off, but the reptile came at him 
again, and it was only after he had procured a large 
club that he managed to kill the snake. It measured 
5 feet 8 inches in length. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 99 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY, L. A. W. 



The annual meeting of the National Assembly 
was held at Hendrie's Hostelry, Boston, Mass., on 
Friday evening, Sept. 2. The members discussed 
one of Hendrie's dinners before discussing the 
affairs of the L. A. W., and accepted this by a 
unanimous vote. 

Reports from the officers were first in order. 
The order made the following report of the 
finances: 

Received for dues, 19 applicants, 932 re- 
newals, 4 life members $983.50 
Gifts 113.00 
Subscriptions 2.75 



$1,099.25 
Bal. Sept., 1909 23.73 



$1,122.98 

Paid Rent $99.96 

Postage 52.25 

Secretary-Treasurer 251. 11 

Official Organ 526.00 

Life Subscriptions I 35-5° 

Stationery 24.35 

Collections 2.90 



$1,092.07 
Cash on hand 30.91 

$1,122.98 



100 BASSETT-'S SCRAP BOOK 

The Secretary-Treasurer reported the following 
membership totals: — Calif. 23, Colo. 6, Conn. 42, 
Del. i, D. C. 11, Fla. 2, Ga. 2, Idaho 2, 111. 45, Ind. 
7, Iowa 9, Kan. 4, Ky. 12, La. 2, Me. 7, Md. 16, 
Mass. 204, Mich. 14, Minn. 6, Mo. 17, Mont. 2, N. 
H. 22, N. J. 87, New Mex. 1, N. Y. 327; N. C. 1, 
Ohio 43, Penn. 243, Phil. Is. 1, R. I. 47, Tenn. 3, 
Tex. 4, Utah 1, Vt. 1, Va. 1, Wash. 2, W. Va. 2, Wis. 
10, Wyo. 1, Foreign 9. Total, 1,240. 

Life Members — Calif. 7, Colo. 2, Conn. 15, Ga. 1, 
111. 9, Ind. 2, Iowa 5, Ky. 5, Md. 7, Mass. 23, Mich. 
9, Minn. 1, Mo. 8, N. H. 3, N. J. 17, N. Y. 80, N. 
C. 1, Ohio 12, Pa. 81, R. I. 9, Tex. 2, Va. 1, Wash. 
1, Wis. 4, Idaho 1. Total 306. 

The annual election of officers resulted in the 
choice of the following: — President, Fred Atwater, 
of Bridgeport, (Conn). (Advanced from 1st Vice- 
President), 1 st Vice-President Quincy Kilby, of Bos- 
ton. (Advanced from 2nd Vice-President). 2nd Vice- 
President, Jarvis C. Howard, of New Rochelle, N. 
Y. (New). Secretary-Treasurer, Abbot Bassett, of 
Boston. (Twenty-fourth term). Auditor, George W. 
Nash, Abington, (Mass). (Seventh term). 

The ballot stood Atwater, Kilby, Howard and 
Nash, 48 votes each; Bassett, 49 votes. 

Resolutions of respect to the memory of the late 
Conway W. Sams, ex-president of the L. A. W., 
were passed and ordered sent to the family of the 
deceased. 

Present 15 members. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 101 

The third annual convention of the National 
Good Roads Association is to be held at St. Louis, 
Sept. 26-29. It promises to be one of the greatest 
gatherings ever held in the interest of Road Im- 
provement. Secretary-Treasurer Abbot Bassett will 
represent the L. A. W. at the convention. The ad- 
vance press sheets refer to the L. A. W. in the 
following complimentary paragraph: 

"It will be remembered that the first real work 
in this country in the direction of good roads was 
inaugurated by the League of American Wheelmen, 
in the early 8o's, and credit should be given to Col. 
Albert A. Pope for his marked prominence in the 
work. At one time the membership of the L. A. W. 
exceeded 103,000. Many of these former cyclists 
are now motorists, including Walter M. Meserole, 
the present president of the League of American 
Wheelmen, and his appearance on the Good Roads 
Convention committee is particularly apropos at this 
time. It is not generally known that several thou- 
sand cyclists still continue their allegiance to the 
pioneer body of the country in good roads work, and 
Abbot Bassett still holds forth as secretary at 221 
Columbus Avenue, Boston." 



Akron, where they make rubber tires, is going 
upward with a bounce in population. Gained sixty- 
one per cent, in the last ten years. 



Joseph Noe, of the Century Road Club of Amer- 
ica, established a new club record for the New York 
to Philadelphia and return run, covering the distance 



102 BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 

in 13 hours and 58 seconds. Noe, accompanied by 
a clubmate, Gus Wohlrab, started from City Hall 
at 5 a. m., and arrived in Philadelphia at 11.28 a. m., 
then resumed the homeward trip, arriving at the 
City Hall at 6.58 p. m. The former record for the 
same event was 14.27, made last year by Jesse R. 
Pike, of the Century Road Club of America. Noe 
also holds the bicycle record of 10.45 fro m New 
York to Albany. Motor-B. 

Way back in the eighties this was a stunt which 
was looked upon as a big thing if done one way in 
a day. We used to- reckon it at 108 miles, and Geo. 
D. Gideon of Phila. was one of the first to make it. 



South Attleboro's (Mass), wonderful old man, Wil- 
liam P. Shaw, who at 80, can ride 90 miles in one day 
on a bicycle and perform other equally remarkable 
physical feats, began his physical exercises at 65 to 
cure shrunken heart valves. Now he so enjoys his 
tasks that he declares that he shall be able to> per- 
form even more astonishing feats at 100 than he 
now does at 80. 

"Look at the firmness of my flesh and the ruddi- 
ness of my skin," said Mr. Shaw, as he bared his 
arm and chest. While showing unmistabable signs 
of being well advanced in years, there was a general 
spryness about the movements. Mr. Shaw claimed 
he was turning the hands of the clock back, and 
that, according to his theory on dieting and exer = 
cising, it would be far easier for him to ride the 
bicycle 100 miles when he reached 90 than to reel 
off 70 or 80 miles at 80 years of age. 



BASSETTS SCRAP BOOK 103 

"I was born Sept. 15, 1830. At the age of 65 the 
doctors said I had shrunken heart valves, working 
like a leaky pump." 

"Having heard of the physical culture tests relat- 
ing to the deep knee bending and holding the out- 
stretched arms in a horizontal position and a steady 
swaying of the body from right to left and vice versa, 
on May 20, 1908, I held my arms in this position for 
95 minutes and after bathing in the briny bath of 
thoroughly aerated water I did 760 deep knee bends 
inside of 45 minutes. 

For the last four years I have eaten, daily 1 qt. of 
sour mlik with 4. ozs. of honey added and beaten 
with an egg beater. I take my bath and exercise 
in place of breakfast in the morning. The long 
breathing is indispensable to longevity, and coupled 
with that give me pure air and I will add strength 
with years." 



The bicycle nurse is the most recent addition to 
the City Hospital corps in Germany . The idea 
originated in Berlin. In that city women nurses 
are given bicycles, and now a corps of these highly 
trained and drilled women is sent to the scene of any 
accident at a moment's notice. With such speed do 
they get ready to go, and so swiftly do they go 
when started that often they arrive on the scene 
before the hospital ambulance. 

Many lives have been saved by this almost in- 
stantaneous response to a hurry call for help. 
There is much that the nurse can do before the am- 



104 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

bulance comes, and not infrequently these few 
moments or few minutes mean the saving of life. 

Each nurse wears a plain, dark costume. There 
is a short skirt, a simple waist, with white turnover 
linen collar and cuffs, and a dark peaked cap with 
a triangle of stiff white linen in front. The nurse 
carries her small outfit strapped under the saddle 
of her bicycle. 



Of cycling it may be more truly said than of any 
other game that there is a natural yearning for it 
in youth, that the love of it grows with the years, 
and that it is a joy and a solace even when the down- 
hill of life is entered upon. There are probably 
fewer backsliders from bicycling than any other 
pastime, for it is a first-rate recreation for all the 
ages of man and woman, and it does not pall. Once 
a cyclist always a cyclist is a general truism, and 
that is why its future is so bright and promising. — 
C. T. C. Gazette. 



We have printed several times that a monthly 
paper cannot well be a news paper. We sent our 
copy, for this issue, to the printer before the Wheel 
About the Hub started to wheel and we can say no 
more than give a guess that the riders went over 
the same old route. In our next issue we shall 
give the details, fhe best history comes from de- 
liberation, and we are aiming for the best. 



We have been asked many times the date of the 
resumption of the Wheel About the Hub. We have 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK t 105 

been unable to satisfy our questioners until within a 
few weeks, and it may not be uninteresting to give 
the facts at this time. Sept. 16 and 17, 1892 was 
the date, just thirteen years after the original run. 
Since there has been no interruption since the re- 
sumption, the run of 1910 makes the twentieth in 
the series. 

In 1892 the Boston Bicycle Club placed adver- 
tisements in the public prints and made an effort to 
find the addresses of the participants of the run of 
1879. Invitations were sent to all those who 
could be located and to many others. Twenty 
riders responded and reported at the rendezvous on 
Sept. 16. The originals were Frank W. Weston 
and Edward C. Hodges, of Boston, and L. H. John- 
son of Orange, N. J. 

Others were:— W. B. Everett, W. W. Stall, W. G. 
Kendall, C. P. Donohbe, D. N. C. Hyams, Augustus 
Nickerson, J. W. Cartwright, Chas. E. Cartwright, 
Joseph E. Hill, Theodore Rothe, Nathaniel Heath, 
all of Boston; Paul Butler, Lowell; J. Kempe 
Brydges, East Weymouth; A^.H. MacOwen, Phila.; 
Dr. A. F. Wyman, New Bedford Will R. Pitman, 
New York; and A. T. Lane, Montreal. 

The route followed was that of the first tour. 

The second day of the tour was that on which 
Zimmerman won the $1000 driving team at the 
Springfield tournament of that year and there was 
much interest felt in the result of a race in which 
Windle, Taylor, Tyler and Zimmerman, the stars of 
the track, were entered. A pool was formed and 



106 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Will R. Pitman was fortunate enough to draw Zim- 
merman's name. 

At the first run all rode the ordinary wheel. On 
the second run, sixteen rode safeties with pneumatic 
tires, then a new thing, and four rode cushion tires. 
Not a puncture reported on the whole trip. 

Now there is something coming that we hope 
you will read carefully and make a note of. 



Our Periodical Department is conducted under 
the rules made and provided by the association of 
Periodical Publishers. We give the lowest rates 
that can honestly be given. The publishers guar- 
antee that they will not accept subscriptions at 
lower figures than is agreed upon. We have al- 
ways advertised to give prices as low as the lowest. 
On Nov. i st we shall issue a complete catalogue of 
magazines and periodicals of all kinds with special 
prices for clubs, libraries, etc. A new scheme of 
clubbing has been adopted. We are asking one and 
all of those who are still with us in the L. A. W. to 
give a thought to this department and throw some 
trade in this direction. The conductor of the 
Periodical Department needs bread and butter, like- 
wise shoes, and a few orders for magazines will fill 
his stomach and protect his feet, and cost no more 
than many of our members are paying to well-fed 
and well-shod agents. Send us an order. 



Have you read the above? If not, go back and 
do so. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 10T 

The bicycle has been described by more than one 
eminent scientist as at once the most delicate and 
the strongest piece of mechanism for its weight 
and size ever invented for the conveyance of man- 
kind, and it doesn't need two minutes' thought to 
corroborate that valuable testimony. In its rapid 
and really splendid evolution there is nothing to 
approach it in popularity, pleasure-production, or 
utility; during the past thirty years it has rolled 
along from triumph to triumph with a certainty that 
has been amazing to those who have watched a 
career that has only been once checquered by finan- 
ciers and their kindred tribes, while public favor has 
never been satiated. — C. T. C. Gazette. 



A man who designated himself as a common, ordi- 
nary citizen, was talking to a reporter about the 
Police Department and more particularly about the 
bicycle officer. "Do you know," he said, "that that 
bicycle business is a good idea? I, for one, am glad 
that Stamford has on its Police Force a mounted 
officer. With the aid of the wheel he can easily 
cover thirty miles of territory every day, and this 
would be very hard on a horse. Besides covering 
this amount of territory he also has the advantage 
of not being confined to a certain beat. Many of 
the big robberies have been committed directly after 
the officer has passed the scene of action on his 
regular beat, which was well known by the crooks 
who planned the deal. It is a good thing to have a 
'roamer,' and more than one." — Motor-Bi. 



108 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Put a nickle in the slot and get a quantity of 
gasolene. This is what an Ohio inventor will pro- 
vide. He will also have a drink-dispensing machine 
on the same principle. What will become of the 
clerks if this goes on? 

We commend to the attention of our members, 
the Motor-Bi, of New York. This is a recently 
established monthly publication which will give its 
columns to the interests of the bicycle in all its 
forms. While there is much more being done in a 
public way by the motor-bicycle there is still not a 
little doing by those who use their legs for driving. 
The Motor-Bi will treat matters in a dignified and 
impartial way and will cover all that is going. Mod- 
esty forbids us to say much about the bicycle editor 
who will go into the chair with notices of the L. A. 
W. National Assembly and the Wheel About the 
Hub with the September number. A special price 
of 75 cents per year will be given League members 
who subscribe through Abbot Bassett, the bicycle 
editor, whose address you all carry in your pockets. 
There will be a lot of pictures and very much in- 
teresting reading. Better take it in. 



A Coventry inventor has just produced a novel 
form of tool bag to be attached to the rear of the 
saddle, which has a red bull's-eye lens mirror mount- 
ed in the center of the cover flap. When an auto- 
mobile or another cycle approaches from behind, the 
reflection from its own headlight is thrown back in 
the form or a red ray which has the effect of a ruby 
tail light. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 109 

In omitting profanity the new language of Es- 
peranto sets a good example. 



Judge not. There will be lots_ of people in heaven 
who will be just as much surprised to see you there 
as you will be to see them. 



Fred G. McKean, Sr., writes from Washington, 
D C: "Beside my dues please find enclosed $5.00., 
which I hope you will accept as a slight token of 
appreciation, and a partial acknowledgement of my 
personal indebtedness,- for your long and faithful 
services in the L. A. W., and in accordance with the 
suggestion of certain old members as noted in the 
bright and instructive Scrap Book. Excuse delay. 
Wishing you good health, long life and happiness 
and favorable turn of fortune, I am, Y,^urs very 
sincerely/' 



Some one has said, "Crime is the only thing con- 
sidered to be news." If this be so, how far removed 
from a news conveyer our little paper must be. We 
are in our eighth volume and have yet to chronicle 
a crime. Racing used to be considered by far the 
most important news, but we don't have anything 
to say about racing because we don't believe our 
readers care for it, in its present form. There are 
those who are still fighting over the amateur ques- 
tion. How that used to trouble us in the old days. 
We used to talk over touring matters, but there are 
no tourists now. Honk! Honk! has scattered the 
tourists, driven them from the roads and we know 



110 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

them no more. Perhaps we are getting too old to 
enjoy the things we used to delight in. Not a bit 
of it! Our tastes are different, that's all. Our mis- 
sion is to keep folks from growing old, and we are 
attending to it. 



The Nebraska convict who has built an aeroplane 
would like to go out and test it, but the prison au- 
thorities fear he might make a successful flight. 



A Persian fable says: "One day 
A wanderer found a lump of clay, 
So redolent of sweet perfume 
Its odors scented all the room. 

'What are thou?* was his quick demand; 

'Are thou some gem from Samarcand, 

Or spikenard in this rude disguise, 

Or some costly merchandise?' 

'Nay, I am but a lump of clay.' 

'Then whence this wondrous perfume — say?' 

'Friend, if the secret I disclose, 

I have been dwelling with the rose.' " 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Practically every well-known magazine in the field has 
advanced! its wholesale price this season, and cutting prices, 
except as magazines are clubbed is absolutely forbidden, 
except in a few instances. Eveiy magazine is classed by a 
number which fixes its basic price. 

We publish a list of the best sellers with their class num- 
bers. To form a club, add up the cluib numbers, multiply 
the result by five and add our profit, which is ten cents for 
each magazine. Thus McClure, 20; Review of Reviews, 30; 
Smart Set, 30; total list, $7.50. Add class numbers, 80, mul- 
tiply by 5, $4; add 30 cents. This club figures at $4.30. 

Many of the magazines have special clubs. Those who 
want periodicals not included in list below will do well to 
send for our prices. There are many combinations to be 
made besides the regular ones. 



List. Class No. 

Ainslce $1.80 20 

American Boy 1.00 14 

American. Magazine 1.00 14 

Atlantic 4.00 70 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 14 

Burr Mcintosh 3.00 45 

Camera Craft 1.00 14 

Cosmopolitan 1.00 14 

Country Life 4.00 60 

Current Literature 3.00 45 

Etude 1.50 20 

Garden 1.00 14 

Good Housekeeping 1.00 14 

Hampton's 1.50 20 

Harper's Bazar 1.00 14 

Independent 2.00 30 

Judge S.00 92 

Leslie's Weekly 5.00 72 

McClure 1.50 20 

Metropolitan 1.50 20 

Musician 1.50 20 

National 1.50 20 

Outing 3.00 45 

Outlook 3.00 55 

Pearson's 1.50 14 

Popular 3.00 45 

Putnam's 3.00 30 

Recreation 3.00 45 

Review of Reviews 3.00 30 

Smart Set 3.00 30 

Suburban Life 3.00 45 

Success 1.00 14 

Woman's Home Companion 1.25 18 

UNCLASSIFIED MAGAZINES. 

Bicycling World $2.00 $1.75 

Century 4.00 3.85 

Harper's Magazine 4.00 3.50 

Harper's Weekly 4.00 3^0 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Literary Digest (new) 3.00 2.60 

Munsey 1.00 .95 

Saint Nicholas ; 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American 3.00 2.75 



"The Cheapest Life Insurance " 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been termed by one 
who knows their value. Use will demonstrate that the de- 
scription was not misapplied. 



(BfiSiP^ 





IMPROVED 



Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake loose. 

No cotcer pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Send 
us size of bolt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



ALONZO D. PECK, 

DISTBIBUTEB FOB 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

178 Columbus Avenue, 

HEADQUARTEBS FOB 

Columbia, Hartford and 

Fay Juvenile Bicycles. 
Reading Standard Motorcycles. 

During the winter months we will make special reduced rates 
for overhauling and cleaning your bicycle, and getting it in 
readiness for next season's use.v 



"The Cheapest Life Insiu* 

is what COLUMBIA LOCK NUTS have been terme 
■who knows their value. Use will demonstrate tha r 
scription was not misapplied. 





KMGULAR IMPmOVKD 

Not like other nuts, they will NOT shake k 

No cotter pins or other devices needed. Made in all sizes and threads. Senu 
us size of holt you had to tighten that nut on yesterday. We will fit a Columbia 
Nut to it— FREE. A booklet with prices mailed on application. 

COLUMBIA NUT & BOLT CO., Inc., Bridgeport, Conn. 



LOCKHART SUSPENDER CO. 

LINCOLN 



Suspenders Garters 

Belts 

1307-09-11 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WM. L. LOCKHART, 
Treasurer 




GOOD COMPANY 
on GOOD ROADS 



THE PRICE TO PAY, 

>.— Applicants pay 75 cents a year. Memberships may be 
for 75 cents a year. Members may subscribe for the official 
the club rate of 25 cents. This is optional and the sum must 
in addition to the dues. Life membership $10. Can be taken 
i other than one who has been a member for five years prev- 
ife members must pay the additional fee of 25 cents per year 
official organ if they desire it. 



APPLICATION BLANK — If applicant is unprovided with 
regular blank from headquarters, he may write his name, address and 
occupation on a slip of paper 6 by 3 inches. Add the names of two 
references and send same with one dollar to Abbot Bassett, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, Mass. Regular 
blank supplied on application - 



TOURING ABROAD.— Members touring abroad are entitled 
to call upon the Secretary-Treasurer for a ticket of membership in 
the Cyclist Touring Club of England. This ticket will give the 
holder all the advantages of the hotel and consul system which the 
C. T. C. has in Great Britain and on the Continent, and will save 
much trouble at the custom houses, where the ticket will be a 
passport in lieu of a cash deposit. 



SUPPLIES — Badges: Solid gold, $2 ; plated, $1 ; Enameled 
Rim, 75 cents. Russia leather ticket holders, 25 cents. Veteran 
Bar, price $2.50. Screw Driver for Key Ring, 10 cents. 



\ 



BaSSStt'S Scrap BooK 

A MAGAZINE FOR RIDERS OF THE WHEEL 
OFFICIAL ORGAN LEAGUE OF AMERICAN WHEELMEN 

A magazine that is read from cover to cover and therefore a first-class 
advertising medium for bicycles and sundries. Also for anything useful to 
men. Our rates :-#1.50 an inch. Repeat, if unchanged, gl.00 an inch! 

Eutered as Second Class Matter, March 10, 1904, at the Post Office, at Boston 
Mass., under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. ««otu» 

Vol. 8. No. 12 FEBRUARY, 1911 5 Cents 



THE IMPECUNIOUS MONTH. 

What's the use of talking about the weather? We 
have been throwing- bouquets at the current month 
for six years, now, and we don't see any results. 

February is the kid month. So little that we can 
afford to slight it. What's the use. 



An overdose of system is just as bad as an over- 
dose of carelessness and more expensive. 



Lawyer (slightly deaf) — You say your husband 
lately left you a widow? 

Matronly caller — No, sir! I said he lately left me 
for a widow! — Chicago Tribune. 



One of our members tells us that, in view of the 
fact that the Broadway Trust Co. advertises in the 
Scrap Book, he has decided to deposit with them in 
future. That's the right kind of talk. It's worth a 
good deal to be able to meet President Lee when 
you go with your daily deposit. Now don't all trans- 
fer the same week. You might paralyze the Com- 
pany. 



170 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

If the devil claims all his own he must have a lot 
of people round that he doesn't know what to do 
with. 



The prospective purchaser paused. (The scene 
was at the motor show, the exhibit was inviting, the 
man in charge competent and strictly truthful.) 

"A car to take six, sir?" He gazed at the firm's 
exhibit, scratched his head and did his best. "We 
don't build this model to carry six passengers, sir," 
he temporized; "but, including the chauffeur, it could 
take five and a cop at a pinch, sir, at a pinch." — 
Sporting Times. 

We were the object of a hold up last month. 
From the Treasurer of the Lockhart Suspender 
Company came a very fine set of suspenders, calcu- 
lated to hold up anything it takes hold of. The 
Treasurer writes us: "Marry your pants to a pair 
of Lincoln suspenders and they will support them 
for life." What a pity that pretty things are worn 
underneath. We are tempted to live in shirt sleeves. 
The Treasurer has our thanks. We can believe that 
now we shall never have a drop 'too much. 



Let us hope that Mr. Carnegie will not brush the 
innocent bloom off the hero of thirteen who, when 
hugged by a woman for saving a girl from drowning, 
merely said: "Pshaw, what else could a feller do?" 



We owe Mr. Fred W. Brooks, Jr., a very humble 
apology. He was honored with the Vice-Chairman- 
ship of the Nylaw at the annual meeting in Decern- 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 171 

ber, and we put another fellow in his place in telling 
about the election. Very much too bad! We have 
heard of murmuring brooks but Fred never mur- 
murs. He shouts! He will be heard from when 
he is in the chair. He has our apologies and our 
assertion that he is and always will be the object of 
our most distinguished consideration. 



Habits are like whiskers, they grow on a man as 
he gets older. 



Three times on the run the beautiful prima 
donna's nearly new car had broken down. Ulti- 
mately coaxing it to get along, the fair lady received 
in the hotel porch the solicitude of a sister artiste 
who had passed her on the road. 

"Much trouble with my car, dear?" she echoed, 
bitterly. "Why, I couldn't have more trouble if T 
was married to the blessed machine!" 



It was on a liner bound for the other side that a 
gay benedict, who was rejoicing in a three months' 
tour without his wife, held forth on matrimony one 
day in the smoking room and announced to. several 
married men his firm conviction that three months' 
separation each year should be obligatory on all 
married couples. 

"Say 365 days!" they exclaimed in chorus. 

And a woebegone, henpecked one in the corn-r 
sobbed out, "You are forgetting leap year!" 



172 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Mr. Geo. L. Cooke writes: "Received Scrap 
Book, Vol. 8, No. II — I = ii = ii. What do you 
say to that ?" Don't know what to say, but it looks 
as though we had won out. 



A New York lawyer who acted as administrator 
of an estate valued at $7,500 has finally turned over 
$750 to the heirs. He probably gave them that 
amount for the purpose of showing them that he 
was no hog. — Chicago Record-Herald. 



Credit one to the motor car — a man was saved 
from drowning by an inflated rubber tire cast to him 
as a life preserver. 



Hoyland Smith, one of the best-known bicycle 
riders in the country twenty years ago, died in New 
Bedford January 20th at the age of forty years. He 
ranked with other famous riders of his day and made 
many world's records. At the time of his victories 
he was six feet tall and weighed only no pounds 
and was known as the "phantom," the "ghost" and 
"riding skeleton." He made his mark in the eighties 
in New Bedford and won the Memorial Day event 
there in 1888 in such remarkable fashion while rid- 
ing an ordinary wheel that he was induced to enter 
the racing field. He entered the principal L. A. W. 
meets under the colors of the New York A. C. and 
made the world's record on the Hartford track for 
six, seven, eight, nine and ten miles, and also the 
American track record for twenty-five miles in 1892. 
The same year he won the national five-mile event 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 173 

at Niagara Falls and he defeated Zimmerman and 
other riders in a two-mile contest at Bergen Point, 
his last big race. He won many tandem races with 
Zimmerman as his mate. He retired from the track 
in 1893 and opened a bicycle store in New Bedford. 



Our old friend Sterling Elliott is building a fac- 
tory over in Cambridge. He wants more room to 
make addressing machines. And this is one of the 
good things the L. A. W. is responsible for. When 
Elliott became publisher of the official organ in 1895 
he made a decided balk over the cost, weight and 
room required by the type for the mailing list. He 
went to work at once to make a change. The result 
of his work is a new form of mailing list, its adapta- 
tion to office uses and very many relative improve- 
ments. And now the increasing business calls for a 
big factory of its own. 



The Old Guard. — The regular meeting of the 
"Old Guard" — men who entered automobiling from 
the old field of cycling — was held in Madison Square 
Garden Tuesday, Jan. 17, and nearly 200 of the vet- 
erans gathered. The "Old Guard" is comprised of 
old-time bicycle men, some of whom still remain in 
the business, while others have oecome shining 
lights in the automobile firmament. 

To the strains of "Auld Lang Syne" the old bicy- 
cle veterans, led by Col. George Pope and Merle L. 
Downs, paraded the upper balcony and then posed 
for a photograph. In the party were William 



174 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Metzger of the Metzger Motor Car Company; 
Harry Lozier, Lozier Bicycle Company in olden 
days and Lozier Motor Company today; A. L. Gar- 
ford of the Garford Manufacturing Company and 
many old-time champions of the cycle track, includ- 
ing Birdie Munger of the Moore & Munger Co., 
body builders, a champion in '92 and a rider in '78; 
Charlie Mile-a-Minute Murphy, now a Chicago 
policeman; Billie Murphy, who held the mile record 
of 2:35; George M. Hendee, the successful motor 
cycle builder, champion away back in the early 8o's ; 
Happy Days Pitman, old-time racing man; "Sen- 
ator" Morgan, who held the six-day championship 
for many years; A. G. Batchelder, ex-chairman of 
the N. C. A. racing board; R. F. Kelsey, present 
chairman of the N. C. A. racing board; Walter 
Wardrop, editor Commercial Vehicle; S. W. Merri- 
liew, editor Automobile Topics; Fred Castle, the 
lamp manufacturer; Ezra Kirk of the Badger Brass 
Company; Fred Titus, known in the old days as 
handicap king and now a prominent motor car sales- 
man, and many others,- including manufacturers from 
all over the country who have changed from cycles 
to motors and motor cars. 

The gathering of the "Old Guard" was so note- 
worthy that a meeting is to be held in Chicago to 
form a national organization, secure a pin and make 
the first meeting a national issue. Only those who 
formerly held sway in the cycle field as manufactur- 
ers, agents, racing men, or prominent figures in the 
old sport will be admitted. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 17& 

Run over by a dirt wagon. So perished Aloysius 
J. Ochs. We knew him as Al Ochs and we all loved 
him. He was a familiar figure in cycling circles in 
the latter part of the last century. Was the Presi- 
dent and leading spirit in the Press Bicycle Club, 
one of the foremost clubs in promoting runs, tours 
and race meets. We used to buy books of him at 
the Archway and he was a prominent helper to the 
book collectors of Boston. A thoroughly good 
fellow and himself his only enemy. To think that 
one so good and grand should have so ignoble an 
end as to be run over by a dirt wagon. 



Horrible to think of. That we must wear corsets. 
The corset-coat is the fashionable spring and sum- 
mier garment for men this year. Trousers will fit 
the legs so snug it will be necessary to remove one's 
shoes in order to change clothes. Already there is 
an end to what the International Custom Cutters in 
convention call the "foolish, over-exaggerated man." 
In his stead will come the "under-exaggerated man." 
Men of football physique will not be recognized by 
their sweethearts and wives when they don the new 
"slim styles." The styles resemble a caricature of a 
dandy French count. It won't go, gentlemen! Men 
like to be comfortable. Watch for the new idea to 
fall down before it gets here. The idea of corset- 
wearing wheelmen! 



It is quite time to be fixing up that wheel. We 
are thinking of introducing a rule laying a fine of 
$20 on every member of the L. A. W. that fails to 



176 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

ride 500 miles in 191 1. Talking about full treasuries, 
how is that for an idea? 



Smoking just before meals is to be deprecated 
because the pungency of the pyroligneous products 
contained in tobacco smoke renders the buccal mu- 
cosa insensitive to alimentary stimulation — in fact, 
their effect is to dull or abolish the olfactogustatory 
reflex, thus depriving us of what Pawlow calls "appe- 
tite juice."— -London Lancet. 



The old Cumberland Road may be restored. A 
movement to reconstruct it is now attracting much 
attention, and it seems likely the celebrated thor- 
ougfare of a century ago will be restored, affording 
a model highway from St. Louis to the Atlantic sea- 
board. This road was one of George Washington's 
pet ideas. He believed Washington should be put 
in direct touch with the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys 
by this thoroughfare^ but his calculations were upset 
by the steam railway and the steamboat, and the 
Appian Way of his dreams ceased to attract atten- 
tion after the invasion of America by the railway. 



Just as a court of New York decides that a "wild" 
horse must not be driven in the streets of that city, 
and statistics show that 8,000,000 acres of farm land, 
in the United States and Canada have recently been 
ploughed by steam instead of the horse, an enthusi- 
astic motorist prophesies that within the near future 
not the auto but the horse will be subject to tax and 
special registration when his owner is licensed to 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 177 

drive him upon public highways. No doubt we are 
nearer the "passing of the horse" than we were 
twenty years ago, and possibly he will sooner or 
later become the luxury of the rich, while the ordi- 
nary citizen will use the auto for business as well 
as for pleasure. Already, indeed, it is possible to 
fix approximately the date of photographs showing 
urban thoroughfares by the relative number of 
horse-drawn to motor-driven vehicles. 



The actual disappearance of the horse from public 
highways is not a probability of any but an ex- 
tremely remote future. Nor will the need of restric- 
tive laws touching motor vehicles disappear even 
when they vastly outnumber horses upon public 
highways or when, as may well happen, they shall 
be recognized as less dangerous to public safety than 
the horse. There will always be slow-moving motor- 
vehicles, and the necessity for suppressing the 
"scorcher" in the interests of such vehicles and of 
pedestrians. Perhaps it is not an extravagant guess 
that the highways of the future will provide "slow" 
and "fast" divisions side by side, and secure the 
safety of pedestrians by means of underground or 
overhead crossings. Nothing of the kind, however, 
can be attempted in the crowded streets of cities, 
unless, indeed, main thoroughfares shall have sub- 
ways for swift motor vehicles and special speed 
regulations for surface streets. Unregulated traffic 
will be intolerable in any event, and when the motor- 



178 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

vehicle takes the place of the horse, it must submit 
to just such regulations as the horse has been sub- 
ject to ever since he was used in civilized communi- 
ties. No doubt Jehu was fined many a time for vio- 
lating the speed laws of ancient Israel. 



Lincoln Road. — In 1901 Congress created a Lin- 
coln Memorial Commission consisting of the Secre- 
tary of State, Secretary of War, Senator Wetmore 
of Rhode Island, Congressman McCleary of Minne- 
sota (president of the Road Association) and two 
other gentlemen for the purpose of securing plans 
for a national memorial to Abraham Lincoln. . In 
1905 the Commission sent Mr. McCleary to Europe 
as a special commissioner to make a study of the 
great memorials there, and to report as to the most 
suitable form for a Lincoln memorial. 

He reported that the most impressive. memorial is 
the Appian Way. Three hundred years before 
Christ, the Roman consul, Appius Claudius, built 
a great road from Rome to Capua, which was after- 
ward extended to Brindisi. This road, named after 
its builder the Via Appia, or Appian Way, was 
called the Queen of Roads. Temples have fallen, 
monuments have been destroyed, villas are in ruins, 
but today twenty-two centuries after Appius Clau- 
dius built it, the road is still in use, bearing the 
burdens of commerce and the name of its founder. 

From the White House to Gettysburg Abraham 
Lincoln journeyed to deliver his speech, which will 
be recited by schoolboys a thousand years from now. 



BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 179 

and which will stand as a classic as long as the Eng- 
lish language is spoken. A broad and splendid high- 
way, the best in the world, from the grounds of the 
White House to the battlefield of Gettysburg, to be 
called the Lincoln road or the Lincoln way will In 
the judgment of its advocates stand the test as the 
most appropriate memorial that could be con- 
structed to show respect and affection for Abraham 
Lincoln. A Bill is now before Congress which pro- 
vides for the construction of the road. How much 
better than a battleship as a thing to pour money 
into. 



Shadower, the Wiltshire police bloodhound, which 
is being trained by Police Constable Nilson at his 
station at Ogbourn St. George, Marlborough, has 
successfully passed a very difficult test. A police- 
man was instructed to lay a trail partly on foot and 
partly on bicycle. At the end of the trail he placed 
the bicycle against a bush and hid himself in other 
bushes some distance away. As soon as Shadower 
was put on the scent he went away at a great pace 
— it is always necessary to be mounted to keep up 
with the hound when he is tracking — and without 
a single check ran past the bicycle, of which he took 
not the slightest notice, straight to the spot where 
the policeman was hidden. The performance was 
the more remarkable as a high wind was blowing at 
the time. — London Graphic. 



NOMINATIONS FOR NATIONAL ASSEMBLY. 

The following delegates have been regularly nominated 
for the National Assembly, L. A. W.: 



180 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

Massachusetts, 10 — A. D. Peck, J. Fred Adams, A. P. 
Benson, E. H. Norris, Joseph W. Swan, H. A. Fuller, 
Edward Burbeck, J. Rush Green, Frank O. Baker, Thomas 
S. Webb. 

Pennsylvania, 10 — George T. Bush, J. E. Harder, Eckley 

B. Coxe, Jr., Warren H. Poley, George D. Gideon, Cart 
Hering, Henry W. Scattergood, William R. Tucker, Frank 
A. Deans, Wm. L. Lockhart. 

New York, 13— T. T. Eckert, Jr., Henry G. Wynn, N. S. 
Cobleigh, W. R. Pitman, Fred G. Lee, F. W. Brooks, Jr., 

C. Lee Abell, John F. Clarke, L. P. Cowell, Geo. T. Steb- 
bins, Wm. H. Hale, L. P. Coleman, Frank P. Share. 

Connecticut, 2 — A. G. Fisher, L. P. Case. 
Illinois, 2— C. M. Fairchild, M. X. Chuse. 
New Jersey, 4 — Robert Gentle, L. H. Porter, H. E. 
Deats, A. G. Batchelder. 
Ohio, 2— H. C. G. Ellard, F. T. Sholes. 
New Hampshire, 1 — Elmer G. Whitney. 
California, 1 — Charles K. Alley. 
District of Columbia, 1 — J. M. Pickens. 
Kentucky, 1 — O. W. Lawson 
Missouri, 1 — W. H. Cameron. 
Colorado, 1— W. I. Doty. 
Indiana, 1 — W. G. Heberhart. 
Iowa, 1 — W. F. Reinecke. 
Maine, 1 — R. A. Fairfield. 
Maryland, 1 — H. V. Casey. 
Michigan, 1 — W. M. Perrett. 
Minnesota, 1 — M. R. Brock. 
Texas, 1— E. W. Hope. 
Wisconsin, 1 — W. H. Field. 
Rhode Island — Robert A. Kendall, John H. Barrett. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT. 



We are sending out a 45-page catalogue which gives a 
complete list of periodicals with club prices and discounts 
on single subscriptions. A postal-card request will bring 
it to anyone who would like to consult it. In addition to 
a price list there are brief descriptions of what the maga- 
zines stand for, and the whole list is grouped under desig- 
nations which indicate their purpose. The club idea pre- 






BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 181 

dominates and while discounts are liberal on two or more 
magazines, a large majority of the publishers insist on no 
discount on single subscriptions. 

There are many combinations to be made beyond those 
which the casual reader can discover. If patrons will send 
us a list of magazines desired we will give the best prices 
to be obtained. 

Below is a list of some of the more popular magazines 
where we can discount on a single subscription 

List. Our Price. 

American Magazine $1.50 $1.25 

Bicycling World 2.00 1.75 

Century Magazine 4.00 3.85 

Century and St. Nicholas (new) 7.00 5.60 

Current Events 40 .35 

Good -Roads Magazine 1.00 .90 

Green Bag 3.00 2.65 

Horseless Age 2.00 1.75 

Life 5.00 4.50 

Motor Boat 2.00 1.75 

Out-Door Life 1.50 1.35 

Philistine 1.00 .85 

Puck 5.00 4.50 

St. Nicholas (renewal) 3.00 2.85 

Scientific American (renewal) 3.00 2.75 

Scientific & Supplement 7.00 6.00 

The list below gives the more popular magazines which 
are not sold for less than list prices unless two or more 
are taken. These can be sent to one address or to a differ- 
ent address for each magazine. 

List. In Clubs. 

Ainslee's Magazine $1.80 $1.10 

American Boy 1.00 .85 

American 'Magazine 1.50 1.00 

Atlantic Monthly 4.00 3.85 

Automobile 3.00 2.35 

Base Ball Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Blue Book 1.50 1.35 

Bookman 2.50 2.40 

Book News Monthly 1.00 .85 

Boston Cooking School 1.00 .85 



182 BASSETT'S SCRAP BOOK 

List. In Clubs. 

Primary Education 1.25 1.10 

Recreation 3.00 1.75 

Red Book 1.50 1.35 

Review of Reviews 3.00 1.75 

St. Nicholas (new) 3.00 1.75 

Scientific American (new) 3.00 2.00 

Smart Set 3.00 2.00 

Smith's Magazine 1.50 1.10 

Suburban Life 3.00 2.25 

Table Talk 1.00 .85 

Technical World 1.50 1.10 

Vogue 4.00 3.50 

Woman's Home Companion 1.50 1.10 

World Today 1.50 1.10 

World's Work 300 1.85 

Many magazines, notably Scribner's, Ladies' Home 
Journal, Saturday Evening Post, Youth's Companion, the f 
Munsey list do not allow a discount. We can supply these 
at publishers' prices. 

AUGUSTUS NICKERSON 

Certified 
Public Accountant 



Room 708 Exchange Building 

53 State Street BOSTON, MASS. 



Telephone Main 3007 



Sep 25 191* 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

3 9999 05495 764